Nutritional Update Service

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A to Z on Illness

ACNE

 

Acne is a common disorder of the skin, particularly in males. Often triggered by puberty, acne is characterised by the recurrence of blackheads, whiteheads and cysts, primarily on the face, back and shoulders. Sometimes acne can lead to long term scarring.

The skin is often reflective of dysbiosis in the gut, so a holistic approach would address any issues there too. There may also be a link with overloaded kidneys, so choose selectively from the Useful Supplements below, rather than trying all of them together. Stress may have a negative impact on both gut dysbiosis and overloaded kidneys.

Orthodox treatment for acne often involves long-term treatment with antibiotics; this can result in chronic yeast overgrowth, which can in turn underpin other chronic illness (also see Candida).

Diet and lifestyle

The diet should be high in vegetables, with a good amount of water. Fermented foods may also be helpful. Refined carbohydrates (white bread, sugar), dairy foods and fried foods should be avoided. For some, gluten may also be useful to avoid, and for many, the quantity of carbohydrates in general reduced. The skin needs to be kept scrupulously clean. Lifestyle is also important, including plenty of rest and regular exercise. Due to the skin's cycle, it is necessary to allow three months following any change in acne care before expecting any improvement.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

High quality multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

As per label

To boost the immune system, aid healing and give general underlying support. The low dose B complex found in some multivitamin/minerals is important if also taking one of the B vitamins below on top.

Krill oil or fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil, take with protein

The EPA omega 3 oil in krill and fish oil has been shown to reduce sebum production and so help reduce acne

Evening primrose oil

500mg, take with protein

EPO is important for skin health, and needs to be taken in conjunction with an omega 3 oil such as krill or fish oil

Zinc

30-50mg taken before bed

Has been shown to reduce acne. Anti-inflammatory and helps collagen production.

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

Deficiency has been linked to acne; some topical medications are derivatives of vitamin A.

Vitamin E

400 IU daily

To help reduce scarring

Selenium

200mcg daily

For pustules

Vitamin C

1-3 g daily

For skin health, to boost the immune system

Vitamin B2
(Riboflavin)

40 mg daily

B2 deficiency can be a cause of acne

Vitamin B5 (Calcium pantothenate)
(Riboflavin)

200mg daily

Studies are limited, but one study showed a very positive response, and B5 also helps to support the adrenals and therefore response to stress factors

Probiotic

As per label

To help rebalance bacterial dysbiosis


Useful Articles


  1. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/vitamin_b2_riboflavin

  2. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/vitamin_a_retinoic_acid

  3. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/skin_news.pdf

  4. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

  5. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9
     
  6. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Detoxification.pdf
     
  7. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

     

Useful Webinars

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.
 

ADHD – ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

A person diagnosed with ADHD:

•      is unusually over-active

•      gets distracted all the time, cannot stick to doing something for any length of time

•      is impulsive, and does things on the spur of the moment without thinking

•      and has great difficult in concentrating.

Diagnosis is twice as common in boys as it is in girls. Behaviours are usually picked up by age 7, and last more than 6 months.

ADHD sometimes continues into adulthood. The over-activity usually gets less, but impulsivity, poor concentration and risk-taking can get worse. These can interfere with work, learning and relationships with other people. Depression, anxiety feelings of low self-esteem and drug misuse are more common in adults with ADHD.

Food allergy, “leaky gut” and bowel flora imbalance have each been implicated as a major contributory factor in some children, along with exposure to chemicals and nutrient deficiencies.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

The most common food allergies include cow's milk, food preservatives and colourings, chocolate, eggs, citrus fruits, wheat/gluten.

Sometimes all grains are problematic, and sometimes all complex carbohydrates can pose a problem due to their effect on bowel flora and general gut health. The gut is known as the enteric nervous system, and has an important relationship with the brain. To address this, it may be useful to look at approaches such as GAPS and the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Broad spectrum gut bacteria supplements and fermented foods (such as sauerkraut and kefir) may be useful here.

Exposure to solvents contained in aerosols, felt tip pens and cleaning fluids should be minimised.

The Feingold diets looks at reducing both food additives that may be implicated in ADHD, and salicylates. Salicylates are a group of compounds found naturally in foods, and are especially high in fruit, tomatoes, avocadoes, broccoli, dried spices and tea, as well as aspirin and a number of other medications.

A number of studies have pointed to the benefits of EPA and DHA (omega 3 PUFAs in marine fish oil and krill oil) in reducing behavioural symptoms in hyperactivity disorders. The omega 6 PUFAs in evening primrose oil may also be useful in combination with fish or krill oil,

ADHD children also typically show a low general mineral status. High levels of copper and , on the other hand, have also been associated with hyperactivity, so zinc supplementation may be useful to help redress the balance. Iron supplementation has also been found to be useful. Phosphatidyl choline and serine, found in lecithin granules or raw egg yolks, have both been studied for their role in improving cognitive function. Vitamin D may also be useful in its role as an anti-inflammatory.

Exercise has also been shown to be helpful for ADHD patients. Exercise, like zinc, helps to raise levels of dopamine, norepinephrine and other brain chemicals.

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500mg krill oil or 1000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

These essential fatty acids are known to be required by the growing brain and a healthy gut; DHA and EPA have been specifically researched for benefits with ADHD symptoms; anti-inflammatory

Zinc citrate

15-50mg daily (take separately from other supplements, except B6)

Zinc deficiency has been associated with hyperactivity

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To help with energy production and calcium balance

B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate

20-40mg daily

To assist magnesium and zinc

Broad spectrum gut bacteria

As indicated

To help digestion

Lecithin granule

1tsp daily

For phosphatidyl choline and serine

Iron (ferrous gluconate) with vits C and A>

15mg daily

Found to be low in children with ADHD

Vitamin D

1-5000IU daily

Anti-inflammatory

Evening primrose oil

500-100mg daily

Anti-inflammatory; important for brain health

Please note that adult doses are given for supplements.

 

Useful articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/NG-Education-Newsletter-Fish-Oils.pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Phosphatidyl-Serine.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/zinc

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/fish_oils_and_the_brain_behaviour_adhd_and_autism

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Education_Newsletter_Digestive_Enzymes_04122013.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_LoRes_SinglePages_(2).pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

 

Usful CPD Webinars

Brain and digestive support for ADHD and ASD CPD Webinar By Kirsten Chick

 Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Managing Allergies the Naturopathic Way Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Webinar by Barbara Wren - Understanding the importance of preserving the correct blood brain barrier

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ADOLESCENT HEALTH - GIRLS/BOYS

GIRLS

Adolescence is the stage between puberty, when children sexually mature, and adulthood. It is usually between around the ages of 12-18, although girls may start to develop breasts and begin their periods earlier than this. During puberty and adolescence, girls develop sexually, physically, mentally and emotionally, and also grow in height and weight. There is therefore an increased demand for energy and nutritional resources, both to make new tissue and to make the many hormones, enzymes and other substances that drive this process.

Frequently linked in with hormonal changes are conditions such as acne, unpleasant body odour, fatigue, shifts in sleep patterns, mood swings and anxiety, and there are also often symptoms of PMS, painful periods and other menstrual problems. The NHS reports that only 60% of teenage girls have enough iron in their diet, and particularly those suffering from heavy periods may want to pay heed to this. The prostaglandins needed alongside hormones to trigger and maintain the menstrual cycle need a range of nutrients including EPA (omega 3), GLA (omega 6), magnesium, zinc and vitamins B3, B5, C and E.

Adolescence can be a time of huge stress. Girls are often under a great deal of pressure to thrive academically, on the sports field and socially. At the same time there are changes going on with their bodies, emotions and mental behaviour that may seem scary.

It is also worth putting in nutritional support to help reduce the incidence of anorexia, bulimia, depression and anxiety.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

Teenage girls are under increasing pressure to conform to unrealistic body shapes, and are therefore often likely to follow fad diets and restrict their nutritional intake. Teens in general are also renowned for favouring high-carbohydrate, nutrient-poor fast food diets, alongside high energy fizzy drinks and a low intake of vegetables and plain water. This may be partly due to peer pressure and advertising, but there may also be biochemical factors. Stress can lead to inflammation and poor absorption in the gut, while both stress and hormonal changes may impact on blood sugar levels and how efficiently energy is handled. In such conditions, there may be a natural inclination towards high-sugar foods and stimulants.

Adolescent girls should be encouraged to eat more fresh vegetables, to help with pH balance and with nutrient intake including calcium for strong bones. Increasing their own cooking or gardening skills and enjoyment may be helpful here. It is often recommended to talk to girls about body image, how magazine images of models and actors are usually digitally altered, and the benefits of a healthy diet that may be of specific value to them e.g. sports performance, clear skin etc.. It may also be useful to introduce a daily smoothie/shake, perhaps with a green powder to boost its nutritional value.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

High quality multi-vitamin/mineral supplement including iron (ferrous gluconate)

As per label

To make up for deficiencies of a generally poor diet and/or malabsorption in the gut; to support menstruation

Krill oil or fish oil

500-mg krill oil or 2000mg fish oil, take with protein

EPA for prostaglandin production and to help reduce acne; DHA for brain activity and development

Evening primrose oil

500mg, take with protein

For prostaglandin production and to help reduce acne

Zinc

25-30mg taken before bed

Zinc is required in production of DNA, RNA and new proteins, enzymes and hormones, is anti-acne and anti-inflammatory, beneficial for mental health, and required for prostaglandin production

Magnesium

200-400mg daily (magnesium citrate)

For energy production, enzyme and prostaglandin production and to relieve tension and anxiety

Antioxidant formula including vitamins C and E and selenium

7500 IU daily

For general health, hormonal support, prostaglandin production and new tissue growth

Vitamin B5 (Calcium pantothenate)

200mg daily

May help regulate cortisol levels during stress, and therefore may help to rebalance sleep patterns where cortisol imbalance is the cause; the adrenals produce precursors to sex hormones

Probiotic

As per label

To help rebalance bacterial dysbiosis to improve absorption as well as skin health; gut health is important for mental health; gut bacteria are involved in oestrogen balance

Vitamin D

1000-2000iu daily

For calcium absorption; anti-inflammatory; for hormonal support; for mental and cognitive health

 

Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Healthy skin

Fish oil for hearts and brains

Adrenal support

Supergreens

An alphabet of antioxidants

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

 

Useful Nutrigold Articles

Female Hormone Balance Part 1 – Premenstrual Migraines

Female Hormone Balance Part 1 – Managing Pain

Report suggests Iron could reduce fatigue in up to 50% of women who have low iron levels!

Simply Magnesium

Omega 3 deficiency leads to anxiety, hyperactivity, poor memory and learning problems

 

Useful Webinars

CPD Webinar - Puberty by Kirsten Chick

Women’s Health Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Pre-empting Premenstrual Syndrome - CPD Webinar By Dr Philipps

Nutrigold’s CPD Accredited Webinar - Addressing Acne: A Naturopathic Approach to Skin Health

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Boys

Adolescence is the stage between puberty, when children sexually mature, and adulthood, and is usually between around 12-18. During that time, boys develop sexually, physically, mentally and emotionally, and also grow in height and weight. There is therefore an increased demand for energy and nutritional resources, both to make new tissue and to make the many hormones, enzymes and other substances that drive this process.

Frequently linked in with hormonal changes are conditions such as acne, unpleasant body odour, fatigue, shifts in sleep patterns, mood swings and anxiety.

Adolescence can be a time of huge stress. Boys are often under a great deal of pressure to thrive academically, on the sports field and socially. At the same time there are changes going on with their bodies, emotions and mental behaviour that may seem scary.

It is also worth putting in nutritional support to help reduce the incidence of ADHD, autistic spectrum disorders and mental health problems ranging from depression to schizophrenia.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

Teenage boys are renowned for favouring high-carbohydrate, nutrient-poor fast food diets, alongside high energy fizzy drinks and a low intake of vegetables and plain water. This may be partly due to peer pressure and advertising, but there may also be biochemical factors. Stress can lead to inflammation and poor absorption in the gut, while both stress and hormonal changes may impact on blood sugar levels and how efficiently energy is handled. In such conditions, there may be a natural inclination towards high-sugar foods and stimulants.

Adolescent boys should be encouraged to eat more fresh vegetables, to help with pH balance and with nutrient intake including calcium for strong bones. Increasing their own cooking or gardening skills and enjoyment may be helpful here alongside education around the benefits of a healthy diet that may be of specific value to them e.g. sports performance, clear skin etc. It may also be useful to introduce a daily smoothie/shake, perhaps with a green powder to boost its nutritional value.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

High quality multi-vitamin/mineral supplement including iron (ferrous gluconate)

As per label

To make up for deficiencies of a generally poor diet and/or malabsorption in the gut; about 5% teenage boys are thought to be iron deficient

Krill oil or fish oil

500-mg krill oil or 2000mg fish oil, take with protein

EPA to support hormonal changes and help reduce acne; DHA for brain activity and development

Evening primrose oil

500mg, take with protein

To support hormonal changes and help reduce acne

Zinc

25-30mg taken before bed

Zinc is required in production of DNA, RNA and new proteins, enzymes and hormones, is anti-acne and anti-inflammatory, beneficial for mental health, and required for healthy sperm production and new tissue growth

Magnesium

200-400mg daily (magnesium citrate)

For energy production, enzyme production and to relieve tension and anxiety

Antioxidant formula including vitamins C and E and selenium

7500 IU daily

For general health, hormonal support, healthy sperm production and new tissue growth

Vitamin B5 (Calcium pantothenate)

200mg daily

May help regulate cortisol levels during stress, and therefore may help to rebalance sleep patterns where cortisol imbalance is the cause; the adrenals produce precursors to sex hormones

Probiotic

As per label

To help rebalance bacterial dysbiosis to improve absorption as well as skin health; gut health is important for mental health

Vitamin D

1000-2000iu daily

For calcium absorption; anti-inflammatory; for hormonal support; for mental and cognitive health

 

Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Healthy skin

Fish oil for hearts and brains

Adrenal support

Supergreens

An alphabet of antioxidants

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

 

Useful Nutrigold Articles

Omega 3 deficiency leads to anxiety, hyperactivity, poor memory and learning problems

Your mini guide to omegas 3, 6 and 9

 

Useful Webinars

CPD Webinar - Puberty by Kirsten Chick

Brain and digestive support for ADHD and ASD CPD Webinar By Kirsten Chick

Nutrigold’s CPD Accredited Webinar - Addressing Acne: A Naturopathic Approach to Skin Health

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here


Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ALCOHOL ABUSE

Prolonged heavy drinking is associated with serious health risks, including cirrhosis, alcoholic hepatitis and liver failure, obesity and severe malnutrition. Binge-drinking, where a large proportion of the week's alcohol allowance is consumed in a single session may be equally dangerous. Heavy alcohol use during pregnancy may lead to mental and physical impairments in the child (foetal alcohol syndrome).

Even moderate drinking may impair nutritional status. Alcohol robs the body of important nutrients, particularly vitamins B, C and E and the minerals zinc, selenium, calcium and magnesium. Lowered zinc levels have also been associated with addictive behaviour.

Alcohol blocks the conversion of the essential fatty acid linoleic acid into gamma-linolenic acid, as well as impairing the metabolism of omega 3 fatty acids, while supplementation with DHA, found in krill oil and fish oil, has been shown to reduce alcohol cravings in a laboratory model.

Diet and lifestyle

Alcohol intake should be reduced to well below The Department of Health's guidelines. A healthy diet incorporating plenty of fresh vegetables is recommended. Grains can sometimes be problematic, especially those containing gluten. Blood sugar support is often necessary, with protein and oil-rich foods little and often throughout the day, especially at breakfast time. It may also be necessary to look at hormonal support, starting off with adrenal support and building from there. Links have also been made between zinc deficiency and addictive behaviour.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?
Build up gradually

Why?

High quality multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

As per label

To boost the immune system, aid healing and give general underlying support.

Evening primrose oil

500-1000 mg daily

Provides a direct source of gamma-linolenic acid and my reduce the withdrawal symptoms experienced by people giving up alcohol

Krill oil or fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil, take with protein

Provides a direct source of DHA, may help reduce alcohol cravings, crucial for brain function and helps repair damaged tissue

Zinc

30-50mg taken before bed

May help protect liver, intestines and unborn babies from alcohol damage. Needed to break down alcohol; crucial for brain function; often depleted where there is alcohol abuse

Vitamin C

1-3 g daily, preferably with bioflavonoids

Speeds up the liver’s ability to process toxins from alcohol abuse; adrenal support

Amino acids (L-glutamic acid, L-cysteine, glycine and glutathione)

 

To support the detoxification system in the liver

B complex vitamins

 

Depleted by alcohol

Vitamin B5 (Calcium pantothenate)

200mg daily

Studies are limited, but one study showed a very positive response, and B5 also helps to support the adrenals and therefore response to stress factors

Useful Articles

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../the_truth_behind_the_need_to_detoxify 

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf

 

Useful Webinars

 

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Alopecia

Alopecia is the loss of hair and affects up to 2 in 100 people at some point during their life.  It commonly first occurs in childhood or teenage years. Alopecia areata is the loss of patches of scalp hair.  It may go on to develop into alopecia totalis which is the total loss of scalp hair or alopecia universalis, the loss of all body hair including eyebrows, eyelashes and pubic hair.
 
The progression of alopecia is unpredictable; hair can regrow within a few months or new bald patches may appear whilst others are regrowing.
 
Alopecia is considered to be an auto-immune disease, with the body’s immune system mistakenly attacking hair follicles and causing hair loss.  Stress can exacerbate the condition.
 
 

Diet & Lifestyle

Regular exercise is known to improve circulation, general well-being and reduce stress. Scalp massage can be an effective way to boost blood flow to the hair follicles, enhancing the delivery of nutrients.  The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for immune support, adrenal support and hair formation and growth.  Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  Regular relaxation is essential as stress affects the condition; nutrients such as B-vitamins, zinc and vitamin C used for hair formation and immune support are diverted to maintain adrenal function and the manufacture of stress hormones.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. B-vitamins nourish the nervous system and demand increases in times of stress.

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

Immune function

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Immune support, adrenal function

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, immune function, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Krill oil

500mg per day

Omega-3 oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Flax oil

1000mg per day

Omega-3, 6 and 9 essential oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Sprouted barley grass

As directed

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients and antioxidant nutrients

Spirulina

5-10g per day

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Vitamin D

At least 1000iu per day

Immune function and anti-inflammatory

Multi-strain probiotic formula

As directed

Immune function and nutrient absorption

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful Webinars

Supporting Immunity by Sally Duffin

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

Alzheimer's disease is a type of dementia that occurs most commonly in those aged over 50 years. It is characterised by deterioration of mental function, memory loss and depression. A number of causes have been suggested including aluminium toxicity, genetic factors, slow virus infection, low serum vitamin B12 levels and insufficient blood-oxygen flow to the brain. Alzheimer’s has also been referred to as type 3 diabetes, and it can certainly be useful to support blood sugar.
 

Diet & Lifestyle

A healthy diet, incorporating plenty of unrefined foods, and vegetables alongside regular protein and oils to help stabilise blood sugar. Regular use of turmeric in cooking may also be helpful.

Avoid exposure to aluminium (e.g. aluminium saucepans) and other heavy metals. Be aware that bromide, fluoride and chlorine negatively impact iodine levels, which may already be deficient, and which is important for the blood brain barrier, IQ and also for the function of insulin receptors in the cell membrane.. Magnesium may also help detoxify the brain of heavy metal toxicity.

EPA and DHA oils from krill oil and fish oil may also be useful. Dementia has been associated with lower levels of omega 3 fatty acids in the brain, in particular DHA, as well as low levels of vitamin D.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Phosphatidyl choline
- note that lecithin granules contain this

420 mg daily

To improve the transmission of nerve impulses between brain and nervous system

B12, B6, folate (found together in most homocysteine support supplements)

 

Deficiency associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

B complex

Perhaps as part of a multivitamin/mineral complex

Where adding in higher levels of B12, B6 and folate, a B complex is needed in the background; in addition, a B complex will provide general support for the brain and nervous system

Krill oil or fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil, take with protein

Provides a direct source of DHA, crucial for brain function

Zinc

30-50mg taken before bed

Crucial for brain function; needed for specific detoxification enzymes

Magnesium

400-600mg daily

Helps detoxify heavy metals

Vitamin D

10,000IU daily

Deficiency associated with Alzheimer’s disease; required for gene expression at DNA level

Iodine

500mcg daily long term will provide an optimum amount for thyroid; higher doses may be required for therapeutic use,

Important for brain function and protection

Probiotic

As indicated

The gut is part of the nervous system and has the same neurotransmitters as the brain, so it is important to consider gut health and bowel flora balance here.

High potency antioxidants (beta carotene, vitamins E and C, and Selenium)

 

To protect tissue from damage


Useful articles


  1. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/can_natural_b_vitamins_help_prevent_age_onset_diseases_like_alzheimers


  2. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/choline_halts_the_memory_loss


  3. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_3_research_demonstrates_it_can_help_combat_depression_dementia


  4. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium


  5. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf
     
  6. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../NG-Educational-Newsletter-Phosphatidyl-Choline. pdf 
     

 

Useful webinars

Webinar by Barbara Wren - Understanding the importance of preserving the correct blood brain barrier
Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

ANAEMIA

Anaemia is characterised by a reduction in the number of red blood cells or haemoglobin (the iron-rich element of red blood cells). Symptoms include general weakness, fatigue, brittle nails, paleness and loss of appetite. Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anaemia. It is often associated with blood loss (caused by excessive menstrual bleeding, peptic ulcers, haemorrhoids etc).

Haem iron found in animal sources has a much higher bioavailability than non-haem iron in vegetarian sources. The common supplemental form often given on prescription, ferrous sulphate, is poorly absorbed, and so high doses are often prescribed, which then may lead to constipation or gastrointestinal upset.

Iron’s absorption is improved by taking with vitamins C and A, as well as the amino acid lysine.

Poor thyroid function may also affect iron absorption.

Low levels of B12 may also cause anaemia due to B12’s role in red blood cell formation. If this is due to low levels of B12 in the diet, which can be especially problematic for vegetarians, then B12 can be supplemented orally. If pernicious anaemia is diagnosed due to poor absorption of B12, then B12 injections may be more effective, although some argue that high doses of oral methylcobalmin may also correct pernicious anaemia. Other B vitamins are also implicated, and a B complex should be taken alongside any B12 supplementation.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

Good sources of iron include green leafy vegetables, blackstrap molasses, lean meats and dried fruits. Foods which inhibit iron absorption, including coffee, tea and wheat bran, should be avoided. Note that haem iron, found in meat sources but not vegetarian sources, seems to have a higher bioavailability.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Iron

Up to 20 mg elemental iron daily, in gluconate or bis-glycinate form

 

Vitamin C

500-1000 mg daily

Vitamin C has been shown to enhance the absorption of iron

Vitamin A

75mcg daily

To increase iron absorption

L-lysine

500-1000 mg daily

To increase iron absorption. This may also be lacking in vegetarian diets and in those who avoid red meat

Vitamin B12

1000mcg methylcobalamin for high dose oral supplementation where absorption may be a problem

Where absorption is an issue. Also take additional B complex alongside.


Useful articles


  1. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-healthy-joints.pdf
  2. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/a_to_z_illness/mouth_ulcers
  3. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../NG-Educational-Newsletter-Surviving-The-British -Diet.pdf
  4. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../NG-Newsletter-Preconceptual-Care-Natural- Fertility.pdf
  5. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical- Antioxidants.pdf
  6. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/.../Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf
  7. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical- Phosphatidyl-Serine.pdf
  8. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../NG-Educational-Newsletter-Wherewithal-To- Detoxify.pdf
  9. http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/.../national_diet_and_nutrition_surveyupdates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf 

 

Useful webinars

Pregnancy Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ANGINA

Angina is caused by an insufficient supply of blood to the heart muscle, usually due to a narrowing or spasming of the arteries, and results in chest pain than may radiate out to the arms (especially left) throat, jaw and stomach.

Diet and Lifestyle

Diet is an important factor in the development and management of this condition. A heart-healthy lifestyle includes a diet rich in vegetables and low in sugar, stimulants and damaged fats.

Smoking, stress, and a sedentary lifestyle are major risk factors. Aerobic exercise should be increased under medical supervision.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

L-carnitine

500-2000 mg daily

Studies have shown L-carnitine to reduce symptoms of exercise induce angina

Magnesium citrate

400-600 mg daily

Helps prevent spasming of arterial muscles; helps prevent calcification

Co Enzyme Q10

60-100 mg daily

Improves heart and vascular health in a number of ways

Krill oil

500-1000mg daily

Has been shown to reduce fat content in heart by 42%, and reduce angina pectoris

Vitamin E

400 IU increasing gradually to 2000 IU daily

Studies of high dose vitamin E therapy have shown promise in reducing angina


Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium/
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/krill_oil_more_than_just_another_omega_3_oil/
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf

 

Useful webinars

 

Supporting Heart Health - A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ARTHRITIS

The two most common forms of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is usually a result of age-related wear and tear‚ in the joints. It can be associated with pain, inflammation and reduced mobility, for which doctors generally prescribe painkillers and anti-inflammatory tablets. These can bring relief to sufferers but are not without unpleasant and unwanted side effects in many people.

Rheumatoid arthritis has a similar, often more severe, effect on joints but is caused by a different disease process. Calcium is dumped into the joints - usually due to an overloaded liver, overacidity and thyroid/parathyroid depletion – accompanied by high levels of sodium. The overall effect is one of inflammation, pain and lack of integrity.


Diet & Lifestyle

A balanced diet is of benefit for both types of arthritis. Emphasis should be placed on vegetarian foods, oily fish (e.g. herring, mackerel) and eggs as sources of protein. Red meat may promote inflammation, and should be avoided along with dairy products (which are high in lactic acid), salty or pickled foods, acidic fruits (e.g. berries, citrus fruit), fried foods, tea, coffee, sugar-based drinks and alcoholic spirits. Nightshade family (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) may also exacerbate inflammation due to their solanin content, and wheat due to its high gluten content.

Gentle exercise such as swimming or stretching can help to ease aching joints and muscles.


Useful Supplements

Nutritional supplements that possess anti-inflammatory and pain relief properties may be useful for people with arthritis.
 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill or fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg fish oil

Anti-inflammatory; helps with correct calcium/sodium placement; helps with tissue integrity

Magnesium citrate

200-600mg

Important for correct calcium placement; each cell needs magnesium to make energy for vital processes to happen

Zinc citrate

50mg

Anti-inflammatory

Glucosamine sulphate

1500mg

Glucosamine needed for healthy cartilage; sulphate needed to keep cartilage well hydrated and to help the body detoxify (Epsom salt baths can also be useful for this reason)

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)

250 mg, two to four times daily

To help alleviate painful symptoms; adrenal support to pre-empt specific thyroid support

Vitamin C

l–3 g daily

Vitamin C is a major part of the substance collagen, a tough fibrous protein which is an integral part of tendons and bones; adrenal support to pre-empt specific thyroid support

Vitamin E

400–500 IU daily

Vitamin E has anti-inflammatory properties, and works well together with vitamin C

Green lipped mussel extract

 

This has anti-inflammatory properties and many sufferers find it compares favourably with results obtained from conventional drugs. It also has a gastro-protective effect against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

Hop alpha acids

 

Pain management

 

Useful articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-healthy-joints.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_truth_behind_the_need_to_detoxify

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf 


Useful Webinars

Rheumatoid Arthritis Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

  

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ASTHMA

Asthma is a chronic respiratory condition which causes shortness of breath, wheezing and a feeling of suffocation. The main cause of asthma is a release of inflammatory chemicals, including histamine, which results in bronchial constriction. Attacks may be triggered by reactions to food, animal fur, dust mites or chemicals, or due to stress, respiratory infections or pollution.

Diet and lifestyle

Hydration and adrenal support are usually key areas here, together with additional anti-inflammatory support, for example with zinc and fish or krill oil. Vitamins B5, B6 and C can all ne useful for adrenal support, in addition to krill or fish oil. B6 also works well in conjunction with both zinc and magnesium.

Magnesium is well known as a treatment for asthma. It relaxes muscles and helps to open up the airways, and so makes breathing easier. Its crucial role in cellular energy production and calcium placement makes magnesium one of the more fundamentally important nutrients for most bodily functions, from metabolism to detoxification, and not least here.

Studies have also linked asthma with vitamin D deficiency – the worse the deficiency, the worse the asthma.

The diet should be low in salt to reduce sensitivity to histamine. Food allergies seem to play an important role in asthma, including reactions to cow's milk, wheat and artificial additives. A vegetarian/vegan diet has been proven to be beneficial in the treatment of asthma. Many sufferers find that keeping dust levels in the home low, and using synthetic pillows and duvets, or ionizers help. Progressive exercise and relaxation techniques can be helpful in some individuals, following medical advice.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

High dose multi supplement

Including magnesium, zinc and selenium and a range of B vitamins

Immune support; adrenal support

Magnesium citrate

Build up to 400-600mg daily

Helps open airways and relax muscles to make breathing easier

Zinc citrate

Build up to 50-60mg daily; take away from other foods and supplements, apart from B6

Anti-inflammatory

B5 (calcium pantothenate / pantothenic acid)

 

Adrenal support

B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate)

20 mg daily (short term dosage)

Adrenal support

Vitamin C

1000 mg daily (slow release), preferably with bioflavonoids

Inhibits inflammatory chemicals; adrenal support

Krill or marine fish oils (containing EPA and DHA). (This is not the same as cod liver oil.)

1g krill oil daily or 3-4g fish oil (take with protein)

Inhibits inflammatory chemicals; adrenal support

Ginkgo biloba Extract, high potency

120 mg daily

To dilate (expand) the small blood vessels and inhibit inflammatory chemicals

Vitamin D

2000iu daily

Shown to reduce allergic response

Spirulina

1 - 5g daily

Anti-inflammatory

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grapeseed, bilberry extract)

 

Inhibits inflammatory chemicals


Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/vitamin_d_may_help_asthma_allergies/
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/vitamin_d_deficiency_confirmed_in_severe_asthmatics/
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/
managing_allergies_the_naturopathic_way_webinar_by_dr_elisabeth_philipps
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/adrenal_support_webinar_by_kirsten_chick
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium   
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

Useful webinars

Breathing Freely: A guide to lung and bronchial problems By Kirsten Chick
Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Managing Allergies the Naturopathic Way Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here


Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ATHEROSCLEROSIS

Atherosclerosis is caused by an accumulation of calcification and fats (largely cholesterol) on artery wails. This results in high blood pressure, weak pulse, narrowing of the arteries, leg cramps and mental deterioration, and is a major risk factor for heart attack. Diet and lifestyle changes are the only effective treatment, and should aim to reduce calcification, improve the integrity of the blood vessel walls and improve platelet aggregation (the tendency for blood to become sticky resulting in insufficient blood flow and blood clots).
 

Diet & Lifestyle

Omega 3 essential fatty acids such as those found in krill oil and fish oil are important to both the health of the blood vessel walls and to calcium placement, and magnesium is of utmost important to calcium placement, alongside an alkalising and hydrating diet. Antioxidants such as zinc, selenium and vitamin C may also be of use here in helping to protect and renew the blood vessel walls.

 

The diet should be high in fresh vegetables, and low in damaged fats and very acidic foods. Studies have shown that vegetarians have a much lower risk of developing heart disease. Other risk factors should be avoided including smoking, alcohol, obesity, coffee and stress. Aerobic exercise (e.g. walking or swimming) should be introduced under medical supervision.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Nutritional supplements that reduce cholesterol levels may be useful for people with atherosclerosis:

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

Calcium placement

Krill or fiish oil (containing EPA and DHA). (This is not the same as cod liver oil).

1000mg daily krill oil, or 3-4000mf daily fish oil

Studies have shown this to reduce total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and to decrease platelet aggregation. Also important for the integrity of the blood vessel wall.

Vitamin C

Up to 3g daily

Antioxidant; important for healthy blood vessel walls

Garlic capsule, high potency

3500 mg daily

Garlic prevents platelet aggregation (stickiness) and has cholesterol lowering activity


Useful Articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/antioxidants_update1/
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/supporting_heart_health_a_naturopathic_approach_webinar_by_dr_elisabeth_phi
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/webinar_by_kirsten_kick_how_and_why_we_need_to_support_the_bodys_ph_balance
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium 
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/calcium_heart_attacks
 

Useful webinars

Supporting Heart Health - A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Useful Supplements

Nutritional supplements that reduce cholesterol levels may be useful for people with atherosclerosis:

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

Calcium placement

Krill or fiish oil (containing EPA and DHA). (This is not the same as cod liver oil).

1000mg daily krill oil, or 3-4000mf daily fish oil

Studies have shown this to reduce total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and to decrease platelet aggregation. Also important for the integrity of the blood vessel wall.

Vitamin C

Up to 3g daily

Antioxidant; important for healthy blood vessel walls

Garlic capsule, high potency

3500 mg daily

Garlic prevents platelet aggregation (stickiness) and has cholesterol lowering activity


Useful Articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/antioxidants_update1/
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/supporting_heart_health_a_naturopathic_approach_webinar_by_dr_elisabeth_phi
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/webinar_by_kirsten_kick_how_and_why_we_need_to_support_the_bodys_ph_balance



Note on Supplements



If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

BACK PAIN

The spine is essentially the housing unit for our nervous system and the skeletal structure that gives us movement and posture.  It is divided into regions:  the cervical in the neck, the thoracic through the ribcage, the lumbar in the lower back, the sacral in the hip area and the coccygeal where our tailbone would normally be.  Back pain, or dorsalgia, can be from any part of the spine, but most common complaints are from neck problems, upper back and particularly the lumbar region (often known as lumbago).  Back pain can be acute – a duration of less than four weeks, or chronic – greater than 12 weeks in duration.   The pain can be due to any of the muscles supporting the spine, the bones or vertebrae, the joints and sometimes the nerves emanating from the spine.  It should be noted that chronic dehydration can reduce the space between vertebrae, causing spinal stiffness.  Just drinking water on a daily basis may still not be adequate to reverse this dehydration, as it critically depends on electrolytes such as potassium and magnesium.  Where magnesium is lacking, potassium follows, which alters the balance of extracellular sodium and intracellular potassium.  The imbalance of these electrolytes can increase in intracellular calcium, which then exacerbates the high contractability of the spinal muscles, without sufficient magnesium to counteract it.   Potassium deficit, or hypokalaemia, is associated with muscle weakness, cramping and pain.  Unless sufficient magnesium is there to allow the sodium/potassium pump to work, these symptoms will persist.  Normality can only be restored by reversing any dehydration and by alkalising the body, perhaps by using Supergreens,which is a rapid method to increase body alkalinity.

With the nerves, structural problems within the spine can start to compress the nerve.  Often this happens with spinal disc herniation, or ‘slipped disc’.  The disc has not actually slipped, but has bulged outwards, reducing the distance between the two vertebrae and affecting the area around the vertebrae.  This can cause nerve compression, often in the form of sciatica, a relentless neuropathic pain.   Compression and chronic dehydration will cause undefined pains in the legs, even to the feet, and in severe cases, a weakening of the leg muscles, tingling sensations and numbness.  A tear in the disc can release of inflammatory chemicals in the local area, which can cause acute, severe pain, which will probably need short term anti-inflammatory medication.  Any real slippage of the vertebral column can be due to spondylolisthesis, a more rare condition where there is a stiffening of the back and hamstrings.   Osteoarthritisand lumbar spinal stenosis can also be a degenerative source of back pain

Medical help should be sought if there is any progressive leg weakness and/or numbness, unexplained weight loss, bladder or bowel incontinence, pain brought on after trauma, previous cancers, or pain sufficient to prohibit sleep.  That being said, the picture of dehydration and lack of magnesium will give a picture of muscle weakness, particularly as it is thought to be linked to muscle loss

Of course, trauma or injury such as whiplash can also be a cause, which could be resolved with physiotherapy, osteopathy or chiropractic therapy in the convalescent stage.  However, 98% of back pain is often non-specific and no underlying disease process is found.  There may be inflammation involved but often there are psychosocial reasons behind the onset of back pain.  In the naturopathic point of view, stress can bring on dehydration, impeding proper blood and lymph flow in the spinal area, as well as a loss of magnesium, which will increase the levels of contracting calcium, leading to further stiffness.  If stress is the factor behind the onset of back pain, then ensuring that magnesium is taken with a Vitamin B complex and a source of Omega 3, to enhance absorption of the magnesium.  The B vitamins are also used up rapidly in stress situations.

The degenerative aspects of back pain, such as osteoarthritis and lumbar spinal stenosis can also be down to misplacement of calcium.  In general, calcium is laid down in the joints in osteoarthritis, causing stiffness and pain.  With stenosis, there is calcium laid down within the spinal cord space, causing progressive compression of the spinal cord. This can be in the cervical, thoracic or lumbar regions.  It is mostly due to the ageing process but can also be congenital.  As a rule of thumb, if there is stiffening involved, then acidification and calcium dumping is occurring and there is a greater need to alkalise the body and increase magnesium levels as soon as possible.   Using Omega 3 oils such as Krill Oil, Marine Fish Oil or Flaxseed Oil, will help reduce the inflammation that is occurring and an antioxidant to dampen the destructive actions of free radicals in inflamed tissues.   It is worth noting that it takes time for calcification to occur, so it may take a while for magnesium to reduce the damage.  Supergreens are a good way to effectively alkalise the body and increase our intake of our ‘five a day’.

Pain is a signal that something is wrong, but we are used to suppressing that pain with painkillers.  The downside to this is that these will progressively reduce the body’s magnesium and potassium reserves, as drugs are acidic in nature.  Calcium will be used to reduce that acidity, ironically increasing the pain and stiffness because of its contracting quality.  Since the average British diet is lacking in magnesium (an average of 267mg per day), according to the Government guidelines, which states we require an average of 375mg per day, it is easy to see how a progressive shortfall becomes a more serious deficiency over time.  Another way that magnesium works as a pain reliever is that it also reduces the level of a particular pain neurotransmitter, Substance P.  As alkalinity is key in helping with pain issues, it makes sense to work towards keeping the body alkaline.  Increasing green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds can be a good way of increasing magnesium levels through the diet.  Fresh vegetable juices are a good way of alkalising the body, but if this is not palatable, using Supergreens powders are also beneficial.  Caffeine from coffee, tea and cola drinks are not only acidic but also dehydrating, which will exacerbate pain.  So, ensuring that the body is hydrated with plenty of water, sipped throughout the day will also help.  Finally, supplementing with magnesium citrate is a good way to increase the body’s levels of magnesium and help towards relieving intractable back pain.

See also - Magnesium Could be the Missing Link To Reducing Nation's Back Problems

Diet & Lifestyle

Increasing green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds can be a good way of increasing magnesium levels through the diet. Fresh vegetable juices are a good way of alkalising the body, but if this is not possible, using Supergreens powders are also beneficial. Caffeine from coffee, tea and cola drinks are not only acidic but also dehydrating, which will exacerbate pain. So, ensuring that the body is hydrated with plenty of water, perhaps 1.5-2 litres (but no more than a litre in the space of an hour). Finally, supplementing with magnesium citrate is a good way to increase the body’s levels of magnesium and help towards relieving intractable back pain.

It can often be helpful to engage in regular gentle exercise such as walking, swimming, t’ai chi and qi gong. A course of regular deep tissue massage can be extremely effective at calming pain and inflammation and easing out the muscles and tissue. Osteopathy and McTimoney Chiropractic can also be useful alongside regular massage.

Useful Supplements


Supplement

How much?
Build up gradually

Why?

Magnesium citrate

600mg

To relax tight muscles and tissue, address calcium misplacement, provide pain relief

Krill oil or fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil, take with protein

Anti-inflammatory, and helps with rehydration and electrolyte balance through keeping cell membranes fluid

B complex (low-dose)

As part of formula - take as per label

To help reduce stress – note that high dose B vitamins cans sometimes have a dehydrating effect

Co-enzyme Q10

60-200mg

Together with magnesium, helps provide the energy for muscles to relax

Supergreens

7500 IU daily

To help alkalise and therefore address calcium misplacement, and provide an environment where inflammation and degradation is less likely


Useful articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf


Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

BLOOD SUGAR BALANCE

Blood sugar balance refers to the natural variations in our blood sugar levels over the course of the day and the way in which the foods we eat influence this. 

Hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar levels) occurs primarily in diabetes, when inadequate levels of insulin mean sugar cannot be transported from the bloodstream into cells.  Insulin insensitivity, as seen in Metabolic Syndrome also causes hyperglycaemia as cell membranes become resistant and unresponsive to insulin. 

Hypoglycaemia refers to low blood sugar levels.  Reactive hypoglycaemia is a common manifestation and involves blood sugar levels dropping rapidly 2-4 hours after a meal.  Symptoms include muscle shakes, headaches, irritability, and loss of concentration; sweating, nausea and feeling faint.

Many people find themselves see-sawing between high and low blood sugar levels everyday due to a stressful lifestyle and diet based on sugary snacks, refined carbohydrates and stimulants such as caffeine and alcohol.  At breakfast time a sugary cereal is rapidly digested and absorbed, sending blood sugar levels high; large amounts of insulin are released to deal with this and consequently blood sugar levels drop too low within a couple of hours.  The person experiences symptoms of hypoglycaemia so reaches for a coffee and chocolate bar and the whole cycle begins again.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Blood sugar levels naturally rise and fall; however these should be gentle fluctuations rather than sharp spikes and dips.  To support a slow steady release of sugars into the bloodstream, meals and snacks should include complex carbohydrates, good quality protein and healthy fats.  Examples include poached eggs with spinach and wholegrain toast; fresh fruit and a handful of raw nuts; chicken, quinoa and vegetable salad with flax oil dressing.

Refined carbohydrates (white rice, white pasta, cakes and sweets) and stimulant drinks must be avoided as much as possible.  Fruit juices are best drunk alongside a meal to slow the release of fruit sugars into the bloodstream.  The occasional dessert is fine, so long as a balanced meal has been eaten beforehand!

Meals and snacks must be eaten regularly, ideally every 3-4 hours.  Going for longer periods without eating stimulates the adrenal glands to produce cortisol which mobilises glycogen stores from the liver and muscles.  This is a short term response designed to support us in times of stress.  Prolonged erratic eating patterns exacerbate adrenal strain.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Magnesium citrate

200-400mg per day

Necessary for insulin manufacture and function; supports energy production; adrenal function.

Vitamin C

1-3g per day

Insulin facilitates the uptake of vit C by cells; imbalanced insulin secretions and diabetes can cause low levels of intracellular vit C. Adrenal function.

B- vitamin Complex

Includes at least 50mg of B5 and B6

Metabolism of energy from foods, adrenal support, insulin function.

Chromium picolinate

100mcg per day after food

Forms part of Glucose Tolerance Factor, aids insulin function

Multi strain high strength probiotic formula

As directed

Absorption of nutrients

Plant based digestive enzyme formula

 

As directed, with meals

Provides enzymes necessary for the efficient digestion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates including lactose, gluten and plant fibres.

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day

Omega-3 oils support cell membrane function and insulin receptors

Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

Source of good quality protein and antioxidant nutrients.

Zinc citrate

15-30mg per day

Insulin function, digestion, adrenal support, energy production.

 

Useful Articles 

Can you halve your sugar intake?

The family who quit sugar!

Optimising Energy

Adrenal Support

Digestive Enzymes

Bowel Flora

Health benefits of krill oil

Super spirulina – for the spring in your step

 

Useful webinars

Focus on Diabetes

Adrenal Support

Digestive Enzymes – the key to optimum health   

Magic Magnesium

How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

A Naturopathic Approach to Weight Loss

Busting Diet Myths

Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

 

CPD Accredited Courses

Nutrigold Academy of Naturopathic Nutritional Excellence

 

 Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

BRUISES

Bruising occurs when capillaries (small blood vessels) rupture and blood leaks out causing discolouration of underlying tissue; this is usually as a result of falls or bumping into objects. People who are overweight, anaemic or pre-menstrual can be more susceptible to bruising.

Very easy bruising may also be a sign that the blood is not coagulating properly: the bleeding caused by trauma to the area is not quickly enough plugged and clotted.

This may be due to conditions or illnesses that affect platelet formation or other stages of blood coagulation.

Calcium, vitamin K and phospholipids are required for blood clotting.

There is a possibility that excessive consumption of fish or krill oil may lead to easy bruising too.

Aloe vera applied topically may be useful in the treatment of bruising.
 

Diet & Lifestyle

A well-balanced diet including plenty of fresh vegetables – especially leafy greens - and a healthy balance of fats and oils is recommended.
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grape seed, bilberry, pine bark extract)

 

To assist in the absorption and use of vitamin C and in the maintenance of strong and healthy capillaries

Vitamin C

500 mg daily

This is an important antioxidant and free radical scavenger, and is needed for tissue repair



Useful articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/using_aloe_vera_for_sports_injuries
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf


Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

CANCER, PREVENTION

Cancer is one of the major causes of death in the western world. It is a term used to describe an abnormal growth of cells which is considered to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors (e.g. stress, chemicals). Normally, the immune system prevents cancers from forming; a healthy diet is necessary to support this surveillance process and may help to prevent cancer.
Cancer has been associated with underlying conditions of inflammation, fungal growths, bacterial growths, toxic overload and trauma. A naturopathic approach to cancer prevention will therefore often seek to maintain hydration and a good pH balance throughout the body while supporting the body's detoxification processes and routes of elimination.



Diet & Lifestyle

It is important to maintain a good intake of vegetables alongside good quality proteins. The intake of animal protein, especially dairy, should be reduced (the proportion of vegetables can be increased to instead, and also pulses, beans, nuts and seeds can be used as vegetable protein sources). It is also important not to overload on cereals, potatoes and other carbohydrates, and to avoid highly processed grains. A high sugar diet should definitely be avoided.

The diet should contain only good quality fats and oils: unsaturated fats should always be cold-pressed, stored in cool, dark places and used raw, and care should be taken to redress the common modern imbalance of too many omega 6 oils and not enough omega 3 oils.

Tea and coffee should be replaced with herbal teas and mineral water. Other risk factors for cancer are smoking, alcohol, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle.

A healthily functioning cell is strongly reliant on essential fatty acids, magnesium and potassium to ensure a continual flow of nutrients, waste and messages in and out as appropriate.Vitamin D's role in cancer prevention is now being increasingly understood, and, a diet high in the antioxidant nutrients beta carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium is now recognised as one of the most important factors in the prevention of cancer.

Certain nutrients and compounds, such as iodine and salvestrols, have also been identified that assist with apoptosis, or normal cellular death, which helps prevent growths from forming as new cells are formed. A regular intake of sea vegetables and seasonal, organic fruit and vegetables is therefore recommended.

As with many chronic illnesses, a cancer diagnosis is often an opportunity to stop and really take stock of one’s life: what needs to change? What needs to be resolved? However, you don't need to wait for a serious diagnosis to address these issues – you can start right now.



Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg fish oil daily (take with protein

For cellular health and to combat inflammation

Magnesium citrate

300-600mg daily

For cellular health and energy production, and to combat the effects of stress

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grape seed, bilberry)

These are powerful antioxidants

Vitamin C

1 g daily

Vitamin C is a free radical scavenger known for its immune enhancing effects

Natural beta carotene

15 mg daily

This is now believed to be one of the most important free radical scavengers

Vitamin E

400–600 IU daily

Works well in conjunction with vitamin C

Selenium

200 mg daily

Powerful antioxidant

Co enzyme Q 10

30 mg daily

Powerful antioxidant, and also necessary for cellular energy production

Vitamin D3

2-10,000 IU daily

For healthy gene expression

Supergreen powder

As indicates

To help alkalise and provide beneficial antioxidants

Pro-biotic

As indicates

To promote a beneficial balance of bacteria within the bowel flora and throughout the body’s mucous membranes


Useful articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/antioxidants_reduce_the_risk_of_pancreatic_cancer
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/can_vitamin_supplements_help_cancer_patients
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/cutting_the_cancer_risk_the_naturopathic_approach
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_nutritional_therapy_of_cancer http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/NG_Newsletter_Cancer.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_supernutrient_in_pre_sprouted_barleygrass
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/vitamin_d_reported_to_be_cost_effective_way_to_reduce_global_mortality_rate


Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

CANDIDIASIS

Candidiasis also known as (thrush) is a term used to describe the overgrowth of Candida, a strain of yeast that resides on the skin and in the mouth, intestinal tract and vagina.  There are over 20 different strains of Candida; the most common one is C.Albicans. When Candida overgrows it changes from its commensal yeast form to become an invasive fungus.

Candida is normally kept in balance by "friendly" bacteria in the intestinal tract, but can overgrow when immunity is compromised and the beneficial bacteria are diminished. This can occur due to antibiotics, chronic infections and auto-immune conditions, the contraceptive pill, pregnancy, a high dietary intake of sugar, poor digestive function and stress.

Symptoms of Candida overgrowth include vaginal and oral thrush, bloating, wind, constipation, diarrhoea, fluid retention, muscle aches, frequent infections, depression, ‘brain fog’ and lack of concentration, chronic aches and allergies. Anti-fungal agents may be appropriate for severe cases, but are only a short-term solution and treatment must also focus on restoring the balance of probiotic bacteria and supporting the body’s eliminatory pathways.

Diet and Lifestyle

The internal environment is of most importance for correct bacterial balance and to avoid fungal growths. Stagnation and poor pH balance need to be addressed with alkalising foods and naturopathic techniques such as dry skin brushing and castor oil packing that encourage detoxification and movement within the body.  Underactive or overactive thyroid function and adrenal stress affect both digestive function and pH balance and may need attention.

The liver plays a key role in detoxifying Candida and supporting bowel flora balance, and naturopathic support should be given where necessary with foods, supplements and castor oil packs.

A balanced healthy diet low in sugars and high in good quality proteins, essential fats and vegetables is recommended.   Include fresh garlic, coconut oil, fresh vegetables – especially dark green leafy vegetables for their B-vitamin and antioxidant compounds; oily fish, eggs, dairy alternatives gluten free grains, organic meat and poultry. Sugar, refined foods, gluten, alcohol, tea, coffee, smoked/pickled meat or fish products, processed foods, artificial additives and wherever possible, milk, should be avoided.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

High strength multi-strain Probiotic

As indicated

To help repopulate the gut with “friendly” bacteria

Biotin

500 mcg twice daily

Biotin can prevent the conversion of the yeast form of Candida to the fungal (overgrowth) form

Aloe vera

2oz 3 times a day

Has been shown to improve bowel flora balance, digestive enzyme levels and the health of the intestinal tract.

Coconut oil

1tsp-1tbsp at before each meal

Contains caprylic acid, a natural anti-fungal and a variety of short chain fatty acids that support enterocytes function

Garlic

 

Anti-fungal and anti-bacterial whilst being supportive to probiotic bacteria 

Vitamin C

1–3 g daily

Immune-boosting - an important antioxidant to strengthen the immune system

Supergreens powder

As indicated

Alkalising and antioxidant

High potency multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing good levels of B vitamins, and zinc 15 mg

Immune-boosting - B vitamins may be destroyed by Candida overgrowth, whilst zinc is important for the immune system

Broad spectrum plant and microbial digestive enzymes

As directed with each meal

To ensure foods are broken down properly as partially digested foods can feed Candida overgrowth and putrefactive bacteria

Useful articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/aloe_vera_great_for_the_whole_digestive_system
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter–Colon.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf 
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Education_Newsletter_Digestive_Enzymes_04122013.pdf 
 

Usful CPD Webinars

 

 
 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

CATARACTS

Cataracts occur when the lens in the eye becomes clouded or opaque, often as a result of free radical damage, resulting in loss of vision and sensitivity to light. The lens normally contains antioxidants (vitamins C and E, and carotenoids) and protective enzymes, which are defences against oxidative damage. Cataracts can occur at any time in life, but they are usually associated with the onset of old age. Surgical intervention can reverse early cataracts but at present there is no treatment for well-developed cataracts.

Diet & Lifestyle

Antioxidants appear to prevent or slow down the damage process. Carotene-rich foods include broccoli and carrots, whilst vitamins C and E are found in fresh fruit and vegetables. Fried and refined foods are a source of free radicals, and should be avoided. Bright sunlight should also be avoided, using sunglasses to protect the eyes.
Riboflavin (B2) deficiency has been associated with cataracts, possibly due to its role in the production of glutathione, a detoxification enzyme that nas been shown to help keep the lens clear. . Eggs, spinach and almonds are all good sources of vitamin B2. Eggs are also rich in cysteine, an amino acid which may have anti-cataract properties.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grape seed, bilberry, pine bark extract)

Antioxidant properties

Natural beta carotene

15 mg daily

Antioxidant properties

Vitamin C

1 g three times daily

Antioxidant properties

Vitamin E

500 IU daily

Antioxidant properties

Selenium

200 mcg daily

Antioxidant properties

Vitamin B2

50mg daily

For glutathione production

Useful articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/vitamin_b2_riboflavin
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/vitamin_e_tocopherols_and_tocotrienols
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Wherewithal-To-Detoxify.pdf


Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

CHOLESTEROL, HIGH (HYPERCHOLESTEROLAEMIA)

Cholesterol plays a vital role in the body. It is involved in the formation of bile, steroid hormone production and vitamin D synthesis. However, cholesterol, alongside calcium, also forms part of deposits in the blood vessels causing restriction of blood flow, and these deposits are a major risk factor for heart attack. The cause of such deposits is still under debate, but many now believe it to be reinforcement for damaged blood vessels,

Whether or not high blood cholesterol is a risk for heart attack is controversial, and many are now looking at homocysteine levels instead as a more reliable marker. However, high LDL levels (low density lipoproteins, which carry cholesterol towards blood vessel walls) are still considered by many to be a cause for concern.

Usually the body has a number of key mechanisms for regulating cholesterol, so that if dietary cholesterol (such as eggs and meat) is too low, the liver can make cholesterol from any foods, and if dietary cholesterol is high then the liver will compensate by making less cholesterol. In rare cases of familial hypercholesterolaemia, this regulation is not so efficient and dietary cholesterol may need to be reduced.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

To avoid calcium/cholesterol deposits on the blood vessels, it may be necessary to address the health of the blood vessel wall, as well as blood pressure, as 2 major factors that may make the blood vessels vulnerable to damage. There should therefore be a focus on hydration, calming inflammation, addressing calcium misplacement, reducing constriction of the arteries and keeping blood pressure levels safe.

The first step here would be to move towards a hydrating, alkalising diet, reducing irritants such as gluten, sugar, caffeine and other stimulants. It is also very important to avoid damaged fats in margarines and cooking oils.Stress plays a key role in inflammation, so it may be useful to introduce or adjust stress management strategies, and include some adrenal support such as vitamins B5, B6 and C.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin K2

1mg daily

Helps with calcium placement

Lycopene

Up to 75mg daiy

Increase artery flexibility and sensitivity to nitric oxide; antioxidant

L-arginine

4-24g daily

Converts to nitric oxide; reduces blood pressure

L-taurine

500mg up to 3 times daily

Stimulates production of nitric oxide; helps convert cholesterol to bile salts

Spirulina

1tsp-1tbsp daily

Anti-inflammatory

Coconut oil

1-3tbsp daily

Balances blood serum cholesterol and triglycerides

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily

Anti-inflammatory; has been shown to improve cardiac function and prevent further damage

CoQ10 in ubiquinol form

100-200mg daily

Anti-inflammatory; provide energy for heart health; remedy depletion from statin use

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grape seed, bilberry, pine bark extract)

As indicated

These have antioxidant properties and inhibit lipid peroxidation

Vitamin D3

2000-10,000IU daily

Anti-inflammatory

Vitamin C

1–2 g daily

To prevent the oxidation of cholesterol, and for the health and integrity of the blood vessel wall; adrenal support

Krill oil or marine fish oils (containing EPA and DHA). This is not the same as cod liver oil.

500-1000mg krill oil or 3-4g fish oil daily (take with protein)

Anti-inflammatory; for the general health and integrity of the blood vessel

Broad spectrum gut bacteria

 

Anti-inflammatory

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

For the health and integrity of the blood vessel and calcium placement

Lecithin

3500 mg daily

Lecithin is involved in fat metabolism and emulsification, and so may prevent fat building up in the liver; bile production helps to regulate cholesterol levels

Tri-methyl glycine (betaine) together with low doses of vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid

As indicated

To support the breakdown of homocysteine.; B6 also provides adrenal support

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Cardiovascular_Health_Newsletter.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/nutrigold_newsletter_adrenal_support.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_LoRes_SinglePages_(2).pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/Nutrigold_Spirulina_LoRes_For_web3.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/one_in_ten_women_feel_much_worse_on_statins

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/calcium_connection_hip_and_knee_replacements_might_increase_heart_attacks

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/study_confirms_krill_oil_fat_metabolism_twice_as_effective_as_fish_oil

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_benefits_of_pre_sprouted_barley_and_barley_grass

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_soya_bean_isoflavones

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/supporting_heart_health_a_naturopathic_approach_webinar_by_dr_elisabeth_phi

 

Useful webinars

Cardiovascular Health Webinar - Getting to the heart of the matter by Kirsten Chick

Healthy Peripheral Circulation CPD Accredited Webinar by Sally Duffin

Getting a Handle on Hypertension - CPD Webinar By Dr Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Supporting Heart Health - A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

CIRCULATORY DISORDERS

Inadequate circulation covers a broad range of conditions, including chilblains, Raynauds, restless legs, leg ulcers, cold hands and feet etc. Many circulatory problems arise either from damage to a blood vessel (which can cause a blood clot) or from the narrowing of a blood vessel (usually caused by fatty deposits). Some medical conditions such as diabetes can also result in circulatory problems.

Each blood vessel wall contains a layer of muscle that needs to be able to contract and dilate according to its needs. In order to relax (dilate) this muscle needs sufficient levels of magnesium and co-enzyme Q10 – preferably in the more active ubiquinol form.



Diet & Lifestyle

A healthy and hydrating diet that includes plenty of fresh vegetables is recommended, as well as moderate levels of gentle exercise.



Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To enable blood vessels to dilate and so increase circulation

Ubiquinol (coQ10)

60-200mg daily

To enable blood vessels to dilate and so increase circulation

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grape seed, bilberry, pine bark extract)

 

For blood vessel health

Vitamin C with bioflavonoids

1–2 g daily

For blood vessel health

Fish oils (containing EPA and DHA). This is not the same as cod liver oil.

For blood vessel health and to counter inflammation

Ginkgo biloba

120 mg daily

This herb can increase circulation and blood flow to the extremities such as the hands and feet as well as the brain


Useful Articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf

Note on Supplements



If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

COELIAC DISEASE

Coeliac disease (also known as coeliac sprue, nontropical sprue and gluten-sensitive enteropathy) is an autoimmune condition characterised by an immune response to gluten in foods which damages the lining of the small intestine.  Left unmanaged this can lead to the development of osteoporosis, lactose intolerance, anaemia and other autoimmune and malabsorption conditions. 

The disease occurs in genetically predisposed children and adults.  The risk of developing coeliac disease is greater if a close relative suffers with the condition or if conditions including Down’s Syndrome, thyroid disorders, diabetes and other autoimmune diseases are present.

There has been a fourfold increase in the number of cases of coeliac disease in the UK in the past 20 years and yet it is estimated there are half a million sufferers still undiagnosed.  The condition is one of several manifestations of gluten reactions; other immunologically mediated conditions include wheat allergy and non-coeliac gluten sensitivity.

Diagnosis is made following blood tests and biopsy of the small intestine.

Symptoms of coeliac disease vary - many sufferers experience a ‘silent’ form of the disease, with no immediate obvious symptoms.  Others experience diarrhoea, pain, anaemia, tiredness, nausea, wind, bloating, unexplained weight loss, headaches and hair loss.  Dermatitis Herpetiformis is a skin manifestation of coeliac disease which occurs as a red rash, often on the elbows, knees, buttocks, face and shoulders.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Complete avoidance of gluten is the only option for coeliac sufferers; wheat, barley and rye must be removed from the diet.  Oats do not naturally contain gluten but can become cross contaminated with it during harvesting, processing and storage.  Certified gluten free oats are now widely available which have been grown, harvested and packaged away from any gluten-containing grains.

Many coeliac sufferers are also lactose intolerant so dairy alternatives may be necessary.

Providing holistic support to the digestive and immune systems is crucial in order to support normal immune function and optimise the digestion of foods and absorption of nutrients.

Avoid caffeinated drinks as caffeine and methylxanthines impair nutrient absorption and can irritate the digestive tract; replace with 1.5l of water, herb teas and redbush tea.  Include a range of gluten free grains; quinoa, buckwheat, rice, corn, gluten-free oats and amaranth are all suitable.

Soaked and cooked grains, cooked vegetables and good quality proteins are easy to digest and provide the nutrient building blocks for intestinal repair, digestive enzymes and immune cells.

Nuts, seeds, oily fish and cold-pressed organic seed oils are rich in essential fats needed for immune function and reducing any inflammation in the intestinal tract. 

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing zinc 15 mg, vitamin C, vitamin B complex and selenium

Immune support, antioxidant protection and energy production.

Multi strain high strength probiotic formula

As directed

Regulate immune system and inflammation, absorption of nutrients, elimination of toxins

Plant based digestive enzyme formula

As directed, with meals

Provides enzymes necessary for the efficient digestion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates including lactose, gluten and plant fibres.

Whole leaf Aloe Vera juice

20ml twice a day before meals

Supports bowel flora balance, digestive enzyme levels and the health of the intestinal tract. Anti-inflammatory.

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day

Provides EPA and DHA for anti-inflammatory prostaglandins

Vitamin D3

1000-3000iu per day

Regulate immune function and inflammation

Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

Immune support, anti-inflammatory, easy to digest proteins.

 

Useful Articles 


Aloe Vera Newsletters

Caring and Cleansing the Colon

Digestive Enzymes

Bowel Flora

 

Useful webinars

Coeliac Disease

Understanding Food Allergy

Digestive Enzymes – the key to optimum health

Understanding Dysbiosis

Supporting Immunity

Nutritional Approaches to managing IBS

  

Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here



Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

COLD SORES

Cold sores are caused by  the herpes simplex virus (type 1), which produces an infection of the mouth, gums and skin characterised by single blisters or clusters of blisters filled with clear fluid. The virus lies dormant in the nerve ganglia and recurs following periods of stress, infection or exposure to the sun.

Cold sores go through different stages of development.  During the first few days there is a tingly itching sensation followed by the appearance of red blisters.  The blisters enlarge before bursting, leaving an open ulcer which eventually scabs over.  The scab can be itchy and painful and may crack.  The final stage is when the scab falls off and the skin heals over.   

A healthy immune system is of paramount importance in the control of infections and in the prevention of cold sores.


Diet and Lifestyle

A healthy diet of unprocessed foods is recommended.  Brightly coloured fruits and vegetables supply antioxidant nutrients to support the immune system and aid skin healing.  Oily fish, krill oil, hemp oil and flax oil provide essential fats necessary for immune function and to reduce inflammation.  Arginine-rich foods (e.g. almonds, pork, beef, , chicken, chocolate, peanuts, hazelnuts, seeds and buckwheat ) should be avoided as soon as the first signs of a cold sore appear, since this amino acid is believed to favour the growth of the herpes simplex virus. In contrast, lysine appears to inhibit the replication of the virus. Quinoa, eggs, beans, lamb and fish are good sources of lysine.

Stress and known allergens (which compromise the immune system) should be avoided, as should direct sunlight.

Aloe vera contains polyphenols called anthraquinones that have been shown break down the virus and speed up wound healing. This can be used both topically and as a food supplement.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Lysine

500 mg four times daily during outbreak

For prevention and relief

Vitamin C

1000 mg twice daily

The antioxidant vitamin C is essential for the maintenance of a healthy immune system and reduces susceptibility to infections

Zinc

30-60mg daily

May reduce duration of cold sore, overall immune support and skin healing

Vitamin D3

1000IU per day

Immune support

Whole leaf aloe vera juice

10-50ml per day either neat or dilute in water.

Supplies anthraquinones to support immunity against cold sore virus and aid skin healing. The juice can also be applied topically to the cold sore.

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day with food

Anti-inflammatory, immune support

Multi strain high strength probiotic bacteria formula

As directed

Underlying support for immune system

Broad spectrum multivitamin & mineral formula

As directed

Cover any dietary nutrient imbalances and provide underlying immune and nervous system support during times of stress

 

Useful Articles 

Aloe Vera Newsletters

Optimum Nutrition and Healthy Skin

Health Benefits of Krill Oil

The Importance of Supergreens

Alpha acids and natural pain relief

Benefits of Vitamin C

 

 

Useful webinars

Supporting Immunity Webinar by Sally Duffin

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Update on Vitamin D – so much more than bone health!

Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

Update on Aloe: 21st Century uses for this naturopathic staple

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

COLDS, FLU AND SORE THROATS

Cold and flu viruses (collectively known as respiratory viruses) cause symptoms including sore throat, blocked and runny nose, fever, headache, lethargy, muscle ache, coughs and sneezes. The duration of symptoms depends on the type of virus and the health of the immune system. A healthy immune system can also reduce the risk and extent of secondary bacterial infections (chest infections and sinusitis). 

There are many different strains of virus, so it is impossible to be vaccinated against them all. These viruses are more prevalent in the winter time; closed rooms and heating systems mean the virus may be more easily spread from person to person.

Vitamin D has been shown to be 8 times more effective at preventing flu symptoms than that the flu vaccinationwhilst . Co enzyme Q10 has also been shown to suppress the effects of the H1N1 flu virus.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

A diet high in fresh vegetables and unrefined foods is recommended, avoiding processed foods, sugar, tobacco and alcohol. Brightly coloured fruits and vegetables provide antioxidant nutrients to aid immune function.  Oily fish, nuts seeds and cold pressed flax oil supply essential fats to regulate inflammation.  Nuts, seeds, good quality meats, lentils, pulses and eggs provide a range of proteins that form the building blocks of the immune system.  Care should be taken that enough fluids are consumed; 1-1.5l of filtered water per day – herb teas may be included too.   Fresh ginger, rosemary, thyme and oregano can be added to meals or drunk as teas; ginger is a warming anti-inflammatory spice whilst rosemary, thyme and oregano contain various anti-microbial compounds to support the immune system. Soups and broths can be not only hydrating but useful where the appetite is lowered.

Techniques such as dry skin brushing, hot and cold showers, Epsom salt baths and water enemas can also be useful where appropriate to help clear the lymph and support the body in dealing with the waste matter produced when immune cells fight viruses and bacteria.
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin D3

3000-5000IU daily (adults)

Shown to prevent flu symptoms & regulate immune response

Ubiquinol (CoQ10)

60-200mg daily Shown to suppress flu virus

Zinc (as a citrate)

30-60 mg daily

 

Anti-inflammatory, immune support and helps with healing

Vitamin C

1–2 g daily

Vitamin C can shorten the duration of a cold

Probiotics

As indicated

To reduce incidence, severity and duration of symptoms

 

Vitamin A

50 mg daily

7500 IU daily

Garlic, high potency

 As indicated

Garlic has anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-catarrhal properties

Fish oil or krill oil

2000-4000mg fish oil or 500-1000mg krill oil daily

Anti-inflammatory

Hop alpha acids

500-1000mg daily

Hop alpha acids reduces the pro-inflammatory cytokine response, which may contribute to symptoms such as inflamed mucous membranes in nasal passages and painful and achy joints. Hop alpha acids do not contribute to side effects associated with Non Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen, including increased risk of gastric bleeding and stroke.

 

Useful Articles 

Flu vaccine versus Vitamin D

Supporting our immune systems

Painkillers cause gastric ulcers

Painkillers increase risk of stroke: think twice before popping a painkiller

UK experiencing worrying rise in painkiller addiction

Painkillers may be causing your headache

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers can cause infertility

Fish and krill oil better than aspirin as anti-inflammatory

Fighting Fit with Gut Flora

 

Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Alpha Acids and Natural Pain Relief

CoEnzyme Q10

Vitamin D

Benefits of Vitamin C

Bowel Flora

Detoxification

The Wherewithal to Detoxify

Importance of Supergreens

Supplement Quality and Nutritional Benefit

 

Useful CPD Accredited Webinars

Supporting Immunity

Natural Approach to Pain Management

Natural Approach to Headache Treatment and Prevention

How and Why We Need To Support The Body’s PH Balance

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach

Managing Allergies the Naturopathic Way

Ear Nose and Throat Health

Probiotics – All You Need to Know!

CPD Webinar - How To Beat The Winter Blues

Breathing Freely: A guide to lung and bronchial problems By Kirsten Chick

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

CHINESE 5 ELEMENTS & NUTRITION CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR
 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

CONSTIPATION

Constipation (retained faeces) can be due a variety of causes including a lack of dietary fibre, drugs, irritable bowel syndrome, dehydration, diverticular disease, stress, depression, periods of immobility and pregnancy. Long term use of laxatives, whilst giving immediate relief, do not deal with the root of the problem and may merely perpetuate the problem.

Diet and lifestyle

It is now well established that a low fibre diet is one of the main causes of constipation. The Department of Health recommends 30 g of fibre per day. Fibre intake can be increased by including plenty of vegetables, fruit, wholegrains, beans, nuts and seeds in the diet. The intake of refined foods, fats, sugars and sometimes milk should be reduced. Increased fluid intake (6-8 glasses of water per day) and regular exercise may also promote good bowel habits.

Increased fluid intake (6-8 glasses of water per day) and regular exercise may also promote good bowel habits. 
 
Soaked whole linseeds, ground linseeds stirred into warm water and linseed tea can all be useful. Linseed tea is made be bringing 2tbsp organic golden linseeds and a litre of water gently to the boil, leaving for 12 hours and then simmering for an hour. Strain and discard the seeds keeping the viscous liquid in a glass jug. Mix half a cup of flaxseed tea with half a cup of warm filtered water and enjoy on a daily basis.
 
Water enemas can help to hydrate the bowel and increase bowel tone; magnesium enemas may be useful in helping to relax the bowel.
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

Anti-inflammatory and beneficial for the health of the intestinal wall

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To ease muscular contraction and beneficial for the health of the intestinal wall

Psyllium seed husks, pectin and guar gum

Small amounts (e.g. 1-2tsp psyllium husks) with plenty of water

These are good sources of insoluble fibre which have a bulking action in the gut, helping to speed the passage of food through the system. Too much can have a detrimental effect, ad it needs to be taken with plenty of water.

Bentonite clay

As indicated, with plenty of water

Shown to be particularly good for constipation-dominant IBS patients

Aloe vera

5–30ml daily.

Helps establish and maintain bowel regularity acting as a prebiotic, faecal hydrater and source of soluble fibre

Probiotics

As indicated

To assist bowel flora balance

Botanical colon support 2-4 capsules daily with food A blend of botanicals including prebiotic FOS, garlic, peppermint and fennel alongside psyllium husks and Bifido bacteria support colon health encourage regular eliminations of toxic waste from the colon and growth of beneficial bacteria.

Broad spectrum plant digestive enzyme

1-2 capsules daily with food

Plant enzymes support digestion of a wider range of foods compared to human pancreatic enzymes and across a wider pH range found throughout the digestive tract. They help to breakdown food and increase nutrient bioavailability. A broad-spectrum plant enzyme formula should contain a mix of proteases, carbohydrases and lipase including gluten digesting proteases and gluten may contribute to constipation symptoms.

 

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_hows_and_whys_of_alkalising

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/supergreen_smoothies_and_juice_recipes

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/aloe_vera_great_for_the_whole_digestive_system

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/detox_fad_diet_or_a_real_benefit_to_our_health

 

Useful CPD webinars

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach

How and Why We Need to Support the Body’s pH Balance

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health

Understanding Dysbiosis

Update on Aloe: A 21st Century Naturopathic Staple

Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

Thyroid Health

 

Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Calming and Cleansing the Colon

Detoxification

The Wherewithal to Detoxify

Importance of Supergreens

Aloe Vera

Benefits of Aloe Vera

Bowel Flora

Digestive Enzymes – The Key to Optimum Health

Tonic Nutrigold Magazine Issue 2

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice. The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

CROHN’S DISEASE

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used to describe chronic inflammatory diseases of the bowel. There are two major types; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Crohn's disease can affect any part of the digestive tract from mouth to anus. It is characterised by abdominal pain, diarrhoea (which may be bloody), vomiting, weight loss and feverand often with adhesions within the bowel. As a result of severe gastrointestinal inflammation other systemic conditions may arise such as anemia, arthritis, inflammation off the eye and fatigue.

This disease can occur at any age but is most frequent between the ages of 15 to 35 years. The exact causes of Crohn’s disease are unknown, but may include genetics, nutritional deficiencies, immune system malfunction or infectious agents. Food allergies have been implicated (especially wheat and dairy). Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used to describe chronic inflammatory diseases of the bowel. There are two major types; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Crohn's disease can affect any part of the digestive tract from mouth to anus. It is characterised by abdominal pain, diarrhoea (which may be bloody), vomiting, weight loss and feverand often with adhesions within the bowel. As a result of severe gastrointestinal inflammation other systemic conditions may arise such as anemia, arthritis, inflammation off the eye and fatigue.

This disease can occur at any age but is most frequent between the ages of 15 to 35 years. The exact causes of Crohn’s disease are unknown, but may include genetics, nutritional deficiencies, immune system malfunction or infectious agents. Food allergies have been implicated (especially wheat and dairy). 

 

Diet and Lifestyle

It is important to ensure the diet is well balanced, soothing and hydrating. Nutritional deficiencies, such as fats, protein, iron, vitamin D, B vitamins, calcium and other micronutrients can result from malabsorption due to systemic and intestinal inflammation, surgery and medication side effects.

Although a high fibre diet may be recommended, too much fibre may sometimes be as aggravating as too little, especially high bran breakfast cereals.

It may be advised to:

·         Eat small healthy meals throughout the day

·         Consider a diet high in lightly cooked, sautéed, or steamed green and bright coloured, low-starchy vegetables

·         Soft, cooked foods (e.g. stewed apples increase intestinal mucosal tolerance)

·         Eat homemade soup broth made from chicken, beef, or fish bones that are slowly cooked

·         Include freshly juiced vegetables and anti-inflammatory botanicals like turmeric to fresh juices, broths and smoothies

Emotional stress can often be a key variable in Crohn’s disease flare-ups, which is nothing to do with the patient’s nutritional intake. Support may be required to help manage the condition.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin D3


Up to 5,000IU daily

Deficiency associated with IBD; anti-inflammatory

High potency multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Providing vitamins such as B vitamins and essential minerals including zinc citrate and magnesium citrate Zinc deficiency is a known complication of Crohn's disease, and magnesium deficiency is prevalent in people with IBD. Both may also contribute to countering inflammation in the gut.

Iron (e.g. gluconate form)

15-45mg daily, if required To counter deficiency caused by poor absorption. Take with vitamin C and A to enhance absorption

Krill oil or marine fish oil


500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg fish oil daily
Anti-inflammatory

Iron (e.g. gluconate form)

 

15-45mg daily, if required To counter deficiency caused by poor absorption. Take with vitamin C and A to enhance absorption

Mixed strain probiotics

25 billion daily
To help restore a balance of beneficial bowel flora

Broad spectrum plant digestive enzymes

 

1 capsule with a main meal. 1-2 capsules daily Plant enzymes support digestion of a wider range of foods compared to human pancreatic enzymes and across a wider pH range found throughout the digestive tract. They are essential to increase nutrient bioavailability from food. A broad-spectrum plant enzyme formula should contain a mix of proteases, carbohydrases and lipase including gluten digesting proteases, amyloglucosidase to digest plant sugars that may cause bloating, and phytase to break down phytic acid in plant material enhancing mineral bioavailability.

Botanical colon support supplement

2-4 capsules daily with food A blend of botanicals including prebiotic FOS, garlic, peppermint and fennel alongside psyllium husks and Bifido bacteria support colon health encourage regular eliminations of toxic waste from the colon and growth of beneficial bacteria.

Broad spectrum antioxidant support

2 capsules daily A mix of water soluble (e.g. Vitamin C), fat soluble (e.g. Vitamin E), antioxidant minerals (e.g. zinc) and phytonutrients (e.g. quercetin) helps support gut tissue healing and repair from inflammatory damage.

Aloe vera juice

10-50mls daily Aloe vera juice has an anti-inflammatory role, supports growth of beneficial gut bacteria and plays a role in digestion, including digestion of protein.


Hop alpha acids

500-1000mg daily, if required Help reduce inflammation and pain in joints and with arthritis. Avoids damage to gastrointestinal lining associated with Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin.

 

Useful Articles 

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health

Adrenal Support

Aloe Vera

Benefits of Aloe Vera

Bowel Flora

Calming and Cleansing the Colon

Digestive Enzymes – The Key to Optimum Health

Vitamin D

Benefits of Vitamin C

Importance of Supergreens

Alpha Acids and Natural Pain Relief

 

Useful webinars

NEW! Caring for Crohn’s Disease: A Naturopathic Approach

Inflammatory Bowel Disorders

Understanding Dysbiosis

Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

How and Why We Need To Support The Body’s PH Balance

Naturally Managing Pain

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution

Update on Vitamin D

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health

Understanding Dysbiosis

Update on Aloe: A 21st Century Naturopathic Staple

Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

CYSTITIS / URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS (UTI)

Cystitis is a urinary tract infection in the bladder, causing burning sensations and pain during urination, and increased urinary frequency. UTIs can also affect the urethra (the tube that urine passes through before it leaves the body) and, in men, the prostate gland.

They are thought to be most commonly caused by the bacteria E. coli which sticks to the bladder wall. Antibiotics are often the first choice in acute cystitis, but do not help with the problem of recurrent attacks. The urinary tract has a delicate bacterial balance just like like the gut, and so stress, poor diet, certain medications (including antibiotics) and other factors may contribute the a bacterial imbalance.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Fluid intake should be high, especially during attacks (e.g. 5 pints per day of mineral water). Sugary foods, refined carbohydrates and alcohol should be avoided, as should perfumed toiletries and soaps. Cranberry and other plant members of the Vuccinium family may help to prevent bacteria from adhering to the bladder, and are especially used for preventing recurrence – however most cranberry juice contains high levels of cane sugar or sweeteners and so should be avoided. Cranberries, blueberries and aloe vera all contain a helpful sugar called D-mannose, which is thought to work by sticking to the E. coli and then carrying it out of the urinary tract during urination.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin C

1–3 g daily

Vitamin C boosts the immune system and helps fight infections

Concentrated cranberry extract

As indicated

Cranberry extract is sugar free and provides a good source of D-mannose.

Broad spectrum gut bacteria

As indicated

Useful to re-establish the gut microflora following antibiotic treatment and prevent Candida overgrowth

Aloe vera

2.5–5 g daily

Good source of D-mannose; anti-inflammatory

Garlic

 

Garlic can help to suppress yeast infection and E. coli

Zinc

 

Immune system boost for recurrent attacks

Hop alpha acids

 

To help reduce pain and inflammation

D-Mannose

indicated

Thought to work by sweeping E. coli bacteria out of the urinary tract during urination

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Issue1.pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Cystitis and Urinary Tract Infections - CPD Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Update on Aloe CPD Accredited Webinar: 21st Century Uses for a Naturopathic Staple

Supporting Immunity Webinar by Sally Duffin

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Dandruff

Dandruff is flaking of the scalp due to seborrhoeic dermatitis (inflamed skin in regions where there are natural oil producing glands).  It can be accompanied by a rash and in babies, is often referred to as ‘cradle cap’.  Stress exacerbates the condition and in some cases a fungal infection may be the cause.
 

Diet & Lifestyle

The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for scalp health.  Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  Garlic, coconut oil and aloe vera juice provide natural anti-fungal actions.
 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

Scalp health

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. Antioxidant nutrients aid scalp healing and repair.

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Hair formation, skin healing

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, immune function, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Krill oil

500mg per day

Omega-3 oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Flax oil

1000mg per day

Omega-3, 6 and 9 essential oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Coconut oil

1 teaspoon- 1 tablespoon per day

Natural anti-fungal and moisturising actions, can be used internally and externally

Aloe vera juice

As directed

Skin healing and natural anti-fungal, can be used internally and externally

Vitamin D

At least 1000iu per day

Immune function and anti-inflammatory

Multi-strain probiotic formula

As directed

Skin healing and natural anti-fungal, can be used internally and externally


Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful Webinars

Supporting Immunity by Sally Duffin

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Update on Aloe: 21st Century uses for this naturopathic staple by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

DEPRESSION

Depression is more than just feeling "fed up." The cause of depression is not always clear but it may be physiological (such as an under-active thyroid gland or food allergy) or emotional (such as stress, marital difficulties, unemployment or bereavement). The symptoms can range from a loss of interest in work, relationships and hobbies to a totally debilitating disease. Depressed individuals may resort to junk food (which is of little nutritional value) and comfort eating, or may skip meals altogether.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

It is important to eat a well-balanced diet; along with regular exercise this can promote feelings of well-being. Over-reliance on stimulants such as caffeine, alcohol, and sugar-rich foods should be avoided, as should smoking. Medical advice can identify any physiological cause, and counselling may be necessary if the problem is an emotional one.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

To help improve brain function, and help reduce depression and anxiety

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

Helps to produce serotonin and reduce anxiety.

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily

Helps to reduce inflammation (e.g. at brain level), and required for key brain enzymes and detoxification enzymes

Vitamin B complex

50 mg

B vitamins are required for healthy nerves and a healthy nervous system

Vitamin D3

2000IU daily

Low vitamin D levels associated with higher incidence of depression in the elderly, especially women

Phosphatidyl serine

1-3tsp lecithin granules daily

To help improve brain function

Vitamin C

1 g three times daily

Vitamin C levels are easily depleted during periods of stress

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_3_research_demonstrates_it_can_help_combat_depression_dementia

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Phosphatidyl-Serine.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/zinc

 

Useful Webinars

Naturopathically Managing Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Webinar by Barbara Wren - Understanding the importance of preserving the correct blood brain barrier
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

DETOX

What is Detox?

Detoxification is a natural physiological process used to rid the body of unwanted chemical. Toxins include those that are produced by the body’s own metabolic processes and chemicals that we are exposed to in the environment such as plastics, metals, pesticides and pollution fumes. Symptoms of toxicity are wide ranging and include tiredness, allergies, indigestion, heartburn, bloating, constipation and/or diarrhoea, bad breath, skin complaints such as eczema and acne, excess mucus and sinus congestion, muscle cramps and joint pain, poor circulation and fluid retention, and premenstrual syndrome.

The body has a sophisticated system of circulating fluids (blood and lymph) to pick up and transport toxins to organs such as the liver, kidneys, colon, lungs and skin where they are neutralised and excreted. Modern lifestyles including stress and poor nutrition can add to the body’s toxin burden and potentially overwhelm natural detoxification processes. Such congestion and detoxification dysfunction may be a key barrier to both short and long-term good health. This means the true nature of detoxification is so much more than fad weight loss diets popularised by newspapers and magazines post-Christmas!

Supporting the detoxification process is a vial part of any naturopathic programme. In fact the process can be viewed as a cleanse and can be carried out at any time of the year. Holistic cleansing programmes aim to encourage the body to self-heal by assisting the natural detoxification pathways through nutrition, supplements and naturopathic detoxification support techniques.

What to Expect From a Detox

Anyone can benefit from supporting the body’s detoxification processes*. In fact detoxification is an essential part of any healing process and should be a natural starting point for naturopathic programmes to support long-term optimal health and vitality.

However, during a detoxification programme you may experience a worsening in symptoms before they improve. This is a natural “healing crisis” and can be explained as the body throwing off that which it has acquired over time and through ill health. Ensure you stay hydrated by drinking plenty of filtered water and herbal teas, regularly eat natural nutrient-rich foods along with fresh juices (see Detox Nutritional Support section). Take time to relax to allow your body to use its energies on successfully detoxifying. Consult a trained Naturopathic Practitioner for more advice about cleansing detox programmes. See the Federation of Nutritional Therapists for more information, http://www.fntp.org.uk

*Do not undergo any detoxification programme if planning a pregnancy, pregnant or breast-feeding.

Detox Nutritional Support

A 7 day detoxification programme can be undertaken several times during a year to help naturally cleanse and support the body. In order to encourage effective detoxification, the body needs to have the right internal acid/alkaline balance, measured as pH. Many foods and lifestyle choices are acid-forming including foods high in sugar, processed foods, cigarette smoking and stress. Enjoy the foods in the alkaline forming column in the table below and avoid acid-forming foods during your detox programme.

 

Alkaline Forming Foods

Acid Forming Foods

Vegetables

All vegetables especially salad greens. Include fresh vegetable juices where possible. Yams, squashes, sweet potatoes and olives are also included.

 

Fruits

All fruits and fresh juices. Limit bananas to alternate days and limit unsulphured dried fruits as high in sugar.

 

Grains

Brown rice (any type), millet, oats, quinoa, Rice and oat milks can replace dairy.

Wheat – especially white breads, pasta, biscuits and cakes. Processed grains and cereals.

Protein

Lentils (any type), chickpeas (including hummus), all types of beans including butter and kidney varieties. Unsalted nuts and seeds of all varieties, including nut and seed butters. Nut milk can replace dairy. Seeds and beans can be sprouted. Eggs, fish and natural soya products like tofu in strict moderation (total of 2 portions weekly).

All meat and meat products.
All dairy and dairy products.

Oils

Cold pressed, organic oils such as flaxseed, pumpkin or olive.

Animal fats, hydrogenated fats found in many processed foods like biscuits and margarines, fried foods.

Condiments and Sweeteners

Apple cider vinegar. Blackstrap molasses, raw honey or maple syrup in strict moderation (no more than ½ tsp daily).

Sugar, bottled salad dressings, artificial sweeteners, distilled vinegar.

Seasoning

Fresh or dried herbs and mild spices like fresh black pepper. Garlic.

Salt, processed foods high in salt.

Drinks

2L filtered or bottled mineral water daily. Herb and fruit teas.

Coffee, tea, decaffeinated drinks and alcohol. Soft drinks like squashes and fizzy drinks

Other

 

All processed and canned foods including processed vegetarian foods like textured vegetable protein (TVP) mince.

Drinks

2L filtered or bottled mineral water daily. Herb and fruit teas.

Coffee, tea, decaffeinated drinks and alcohol. Soft drinks like squashes and fizzy drinks

Other

 

All processed and canned foods including processed vegetarian foods like textured vegetable protein (TVP) mince.

Drinks

2L filtered or bottled mineral water daily. Herb and fruit teas.

Coffee, tea, decaffeinated drinks and alcohol. Soft drinks like squashes and fizzy drinks

Other

 

All processed and canned foods including processed vegetarian foods like textured vegetable protein (TVP) mince.

Juicing is a highly beneficial and easy way of helping the body to detoxify. Raw vegetables are full of enzymes that help the digestion. They contribute a concentrated supply of phytonutrients, including important antioxidants, which could not be obtained by eating normal daily amounts of fruit and vegetables. This is partly due to the presence of fibre in whole plant material that inhibits the absorption of vital phytonutrients through the gut. Raw juices stimulate the function of bowel, liver and kidneys helping to increase the break down and elimination of toxic chemicals and waste products from the body.

Enjoy two daily fresh juices (250-300ml portions) between meals. Drinking fresh juices on an empty stomach encourages maximum absorption of nutrients. Concentrated greens powders, organic spirulina powder and even Aloe Vera juice can be mixed into juices. Do not combine fruit and vegetables in the same juice other than apples and carrots, which may cross over. Enjoy one fruit and one vegetable juice daily.

Popular juice combinations include:

  • Apple, carrot and ginger
  • Kale, spinach, apple and celery
  • Beetroot, ginger, celery and apple

 

Detox Lifestyle Support

Any combination of the following techniques can be used as part of a naturopathic programme to support detoxification.

Detoxification Support Technique

Why?

Epsom salt bath

Epsom salt is magnesium sulphate that is absorbed through the skin. Sulphates help detoxification pathways and help to eliminate toxins through the skin by sweating. Magnesium is a cofactor for many enzymes including detoxification pathways in the liver and sodium/ potassium pump in cells. Not advisable for people with high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetics.

Castor oil packs

External use of castor oil can be highly effective for relieving constipation and encouraging eliminations from lymphatic stimulation helping natural detoxification processes.

Dry skin brushing

Body brush for 2-3 minutes on dry skin (before shower or bath) to encourage lymphatic circulation.

Enemas and Clysmatics

Organic coffee enemas powerfully stimulate liver detoxification pathways through direct absorption via the hepatic portal vein from the colon to liver. Enemas and Clysmatics also support eliminations of toxic waste from the bowel. They have great value during a cleansing detox programme but are not essential.

Detox Supplement Support

Essential Supplement Support

How Much?

Why?

Probiotic

1-2 capsules daily, with food but away from hot drinks

To help replenish beneficial gut bacteria, support digestion and immune system and ensure efficient bowel eliminations.

High quality multi-vitamin/mineral and amino acid detoxification support supplement

4-8 capsules daily, after food spread out across day

Cellular detoxification pathways require many nutrients to support enzyme action. Phase 1 and 2 liver detoxification pathways also require certain amino acids to bind to toxins to enhance their excretion.

Botanical colon support supplement

2-4 capsules daily with food

A blend of botanicals including garlic, peppermint and fennel alongside psyllium husks and Bifido bacteria support colon health encourage regular eliminations of toxic waste from the colon and growth of beneficial bacteria.

Concentrated greens powder

2tbsp (approx 20g) daily mixed into fresh juices

A mix of organic alkalising ingredients including pre-sprouted barley, apples, linseeds and turmeric naturally supports alkalisation in the body.

Additional Supplement Support

Organic Spirulina powder

1-2tsp (approx 5-10g) daily mixed into fresh juice

Spirulina is a blue-green algae rich in many important micronutrients including alkalising chlorophyll.

Whole leaf Aloe Vera juice

10-50ml daily. Can be mixed into fresh juice

Aloe Vera juice contains polysaccharides that support digestive health including beneficial gut bacteria growth, digestion as well as anti-inflammatory and immune supporting roles.

Broad spectrum digestive enzyme

1 capsule with a main meal. 1-2 capsules daily

Plant enzymes support digestion of a wider range of foods compared to human pancreatic enzymes and across a wider pH range found throughout the digestive tract. They are essential to increase nutrient bioavailability from food. A broad-spectrum plant enzyme formula should contain a mix of proteases, carbohydrases and lipase including gluten digesting proteases, amyloglucosidase to digest plant sugars that may cause bloating, and phytase to break down phytic acid in plant material enhancing mineral bioavailability.

Phosphatidyl enriched lecithin and plant sterol powder

1-2tsp (5-10g) daily

Lipotropic substances like phosphatidyl choline support liver cell health and fat metabolism. Plant sterols specifically enhance cholesterol excretion.

Sulphur amino acids

3 capsules daily

Glutathione, a powerful detoxification enzyme concentrated in the liver, is made from sulphur containing amino acids including methionine and cysteine. Sulphur amino acids also bind to heavy metals in the body aiding their excretion.

Magnesium citrate

1-2 capsules daily

Magnesium is a cofactor for many enzymes including detoxification pathways in the liver and sodium/ potassium pump in cells. Magnesium is also vital for production of ATP, the energy unit of all living cells and required to power detoxification processes.

Useful Information for Detoxification Support

Nutrigold Newsletters

Detoxification
The Wherewithal to Detoxify
Importance of Supergreens
Aloe Vera
Benefits of Aloe Vera
Bowel Flora
Calming and Cleansing the Colon
Digestive Enzymes – The Key to Optimum Health
Lecithin and Plant Sterols
 

Nutrigold Webinars

Essential Guide to a Successful Detox
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach
How and Why We Need to Support the Body’s pH Balance
Liver and Gall Bladder Health
Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health
Understanding Dysbiosis
Update on Aloe: A 21st Century Naturopathic Staple
Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

 

Nutrigold Update Articles

THE BENEFITS OF PRE SPROUTED BARLEY AND BARLEY GRASS
DETOXIFYING THE LIVER PHASE 1 AND 2 LIVER ENZYMES
WHAT IS DETOXING ACTUALLY ALL ABOUT?
COULD PRE-SPROUTED BARLEY PUT THE BOUNCE BACK INTO YOUR LIFE?
THE TRUTH BEHIND THE NEED TO DETOXIFY
CHLOROPHYLL – THE ALKALISING MOLECULE OF LIFE
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/Nutrigold-Detox-Guide.pdf

DIABETES

Diabetes is a condition where blood glucose is chronically high (hyperglycaemia). This is because the pancreas does not produce enough, or maybe any, of the hormone insulin, which helps glucose uptake into the cells (Type 1 diabetes). If the pancreas produces insulin this hormone may still not work helping sugar uptake from the blood into the cells causing insulin resistance (Type 2 diabetes). Type 1 diabetes often manifests in childhood and teenage years whereas Type 2 diabetes more commonly develops in adulthood. However, poor dietary and lifestyle choices means the incidence of Type 2 diabetes is rising in the younger population.

A prediabetic state (borderline diabetes) can also be diagnosed. This a metabolic condition and growing global problem closely tied with obesity. Borderline diabetes is characterised by the presence of higher than normal blood glucose levels, changes in blood fat levels (e.g. triglycerides and cholesterol), obesity (especially fat around the middle) and high blood pressure. This state is reversible but if left can progress to Type 2 diabetes.

If left unchecked, hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose) can lead to diabetic complications including damage to blood vessels in the eye (retinopathy), damage to nerves (neuropathy) causing numb feet etc. and kidney damage (nephropathy). This is in part due to the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGE), complexes formed from sugar in the blood that bind to blood vessel walls and accumulate in nerves. AGE cause damage to nerves and blood vessels as well as increasing inflammation and free radical levels.  

 

Diet and Lifestyle

It is important to ensure the diet is rich in vegetables, soluble fibre (e.g. porridge oats), protein (e.g. lean meats such as chicken or turkey, fish and pulses and beans), beneficial fats (e.g. nuts and avocado) and some slow releasing (complex) carbohydrates such as some brown rice or oats. Sugary (simple) carbohydrates such as cakes, biscuits, sweets and also savoury foods such as processed wheat products (bread etc.) and jacket potatoes can also cause rapid changes in blood glucose; something to be avoided when trying to balance blood sugar. Reducing sugar in the diet also helps balance the levels of AGE production in the blood and reduces intake of preformed AGE found processed sugary foods.

Fruits high in sugar (e.g. grapes, mango, bananas, dried fruit) should be limited, as well as starchy vegetables such as beetroot, carrots, parsnips, potatoes and sweet potatoes because of the effect on blood glucose levels. This includes fruit juices as well as some types of vegetable juice, which can be high in sugar, e.g. carrot juice. A green juice based on green vegetables such as cucumber, kale, celery etc. would be more suitable. Some herbs and spices may also be helpful in supporting insulin actions including cinnamon, ginger and fenugreek. Organic plant matter should be consumed where possible as they contain higher levels of antioxidants to support reduction of free radicals.

Alcohol should be avoided as well as eliminating all soft drinks including those containing artificial sweeteners or high in fruit juice concentrates etc. Enjoy herbal teas and at 1.5-2L water daily.

It is also important to increase daily physical exercise. This can be as simple as enjoying a daily walk, as well as other exercise programmes. AGE can also be found in tobacco smoke so it is imperative to stop smoking.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

High potency multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Providing vitamins such as B vitamins including biotin and essential minerals including zinc citrate and magnesium citrate

Biotin works synergistically with insulin increasing the activity of glucokinase enzyme, the first step in glucose utilisation in the cells

B vitamin complex

1 capsule daily

Provides extra B vitamins (including biotin and Vitamin B3 and B6) necessary for supporting carbohydrate metabolism, nerve and blood vessel health

Magnesium citrate

100-200mg elemental magnesium daily

Crucial mineral for energy production and controlling blood sugar levels

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg fish oil daily

Omega 3 EFAs support structure of cell membranes and have an anti-inflammatory action within the body

Chromium

100-200mcg daily

To support action of insulin transporting glucose across the cell membrane

Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol form)

30-60mg

Supports carbohydrate metabolism and may lower blood glucose levels

Vitamin C

1000-2000mg daily

Vitamin C may improve cellular glucose tolerance and reduce blood sorbitol, a harmful sugar when it accumulates, which may lead to increased risk of diabetic complications. Vitamin C also support against free radical damage.

Natural Vitamin E

400IU daily

Improves blood glucose control and protects blood vessels and nerves from free radical damages

Vitamin D3

Up to 5,000IU daily

Boosts insulin sensitivity and supports the immune system

Aloe vera juice

10-50mls daily

Aloe vera juice has an anti-inflammatory role, supports digestion and may help balance blood sugars

 

Lecithin with plant sterols

2-4stsp daily

Lecithin provides phosphatidyl choline, an important nutrient required to support the structure of healthy cell membranes. Plant sterols may help balance blood lipids, in particular reduce the reabsorption of cholesterol in the gut

 

Organic spirulina* or alkalising greens powder

1-2tsp* or 1-2tbsp1 daily

Take in daily green juice to support cell function

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/reducing_your_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_by_up_to_43

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/vitamin_d_a_key_nutrient_for_diabetics

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/organic_crops_have_up_to_60_more_antioxidants

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_3_fatty_acids_reduce_risk_of_type2_diabetes_which_most_effective

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/coenzyme_q10_reduces_vascular_problems_in_diabetes

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/introducing_ubiquinol_the_form_of_coq10_that_every_cell_needs

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/new_evidence_of_links_between_diabetes_and_vitamin_d_deficiency

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

Adrenal Support

Aloe Vera

Benefits of Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera and Diabetes

Vitamin D

Benefits of Vitamin C

Importance of Supergreens

CoEnzyme Q10

 

Useful webinars

How and Why We Need To Support The Body’s PH Balance

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution

Update on Vitamin D

Update on Aloe: A 21st Century Naturopathic Staple

Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

Liver and Gallbladder Health

Getting a Handle on Hypertension

Fatty Liver Disease: A 21st Century Health Epidemic

A Naturopathic Approach to Weight Loss

Antioxidants

What’s So Cute About CoQ10?

Supporting Heart Health

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice. The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Diverticulitis

In the western world, diverticular disease affects 1 in 10 people over the age of forty and 1 in 3 people over the age of sixty. Some evidence suggests that low fibre diets and other causes of constipation are to blame for this disease. A low fibre diet produces stools of small volume, which are difficult for the bowel to move along the colon. Excessive straining to pass these stools results in high pressure which forces pouches of the bowel lining out through the wall of the gut; these pouches become inflamed and infected causing pain, abdominal swelling, nausea, vomiting and fever.

Diet and lifestyle

A diet rich in soluble and insoluble fibres is recommended, including plenty of vegetables, soaked grains, nuts, ground seeds, oily fish, white meat, beans and pulses. Reducing red meat intake can be beneficial as red meat takes a long time to pass through the digestive tract.

Gluten (found in wheat, barley, rye and at low levels in oats) is best avoided as it can compromise intestinal integrity and contribute towards inflammation.

Bran fibre has not been shown to have a beneficial effect, and may instead be too harsh and dehydrating for the colon. Hot spicy foods, salty foods, tea and coffee should be avoided. A high fluid intake and exercise are also important as these improve circulation and aid bowel movement.

See also CONSTIPATION, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE, IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

Flaxseed (linseed) tea can be useful for hydrating the colon and softening stools: bring 2tbsp golden linseeds and a litre of water gently to the boil, leave for 12 hours and then simmer for an hour before straining and storing in the fridge.  Dilute the mixture with plain warm water and drink 2-3 mugs per day.

Water and magnesium enemas can help to hydrate the bowel and increase bowel tone.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

Anti-inflammatory and beneficial for the health of the intestinal wall

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To ease muscular contraction and beneficial for the health of the intestinal wall

Aloe vera juice

10-50ml daily

Aloe vera has anti-inflammatory actions, supports beneficial gut flora, and assists in establishing and maintaining regular bowel movements

Psyllium

 

Available in capsule form this is an easy way to add fibre to the diet

High strength multi-strain probiotics

As indicated

To help repopulate the bowel with friendly, healthy bacteria

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily

Anti-inflammatory and beneficial for the health of the intestinal wall

Vitamin C

1–2 g daily

To help prevent localised infections

Ground flaxseeds

1-2 dessertspoons per day

Ground flaxseeds are rich in mucilage and fibres which soothe inflammation and aid stool formation

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/.../NG-Education-Newsletter–Colon.pdf 
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/.../NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutritional.../krill_oil_background_benefits
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Webinar by Sally Duffin – Nutritional Approaches for Managing IBS

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Dry Scalp

A dry itchy scalp can be caused by seborrhoeic dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis or any kind of skin infection.  The scalp may be red, inflamed, sore and very itchy.  Stress aggravates these conditions so regular relaxation and adrenal support alongside incorporating nutrients for hair health is beneficial


Diet & Lifestyle
Regular exercise is known to improve circulation, general well-being and reduce stress. Scalp massage can be an effective way to boost blood flow to the hair follicles, enhancing the delivery of nutrients.  The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for scalp health.  Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  Regular relaxation is essential as stress affects dry skin conditions; nutrients such as B-vitamins, zinc and vitamin C used for skin health are diverted to support adrenal function and the manufacture of stress hormones.
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

Skin formation and scalp health

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. B-vitamins nourish the nervous system and demand increases in times of stress.

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Hair formation, skin healing

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, immune function, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Krill oil

500mg per day

Omega-3 oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Flax oil

1000mg per day

Omega-3, 6 and 9 essential oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Coconut oil

1 teaspoon- 1 tablespoon per day

Moisturising actions, can be used internally and externally

Aloe vera juice

As directed

Skin healing and natural anti-fungal, can be used internally and externally

Vitamin D

At least 1000iu per day

Immune function and anti-inflammatory

Multi-strain probiotic formula

As directed

Immune function and nutrient absorption

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful Webinars

Update on Aloe: 21st Century uses for this naturopathic staple by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Eczema Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

ECZEMA

Eczema is a common skin condition characterised by dry thickened skin which flakes and forms blisters, and is intensely itchy. Atopic eczema is the most common form of eczema, and is largely confined to childhood although it can recur in later life. Seborrhoeic eczema affects the scalp and face and can develop at any age, whilst irritant contact dermatitis is a skin reaction caused by irritant substances such as acids, disinfectants or reaction to substances such as rubber, glue or preservatives.

 

Diet and lifestyle

The skin is the body’s largest route of elimination. Eczema and other chronic skin complaints may be viewed naturopathically as a struggling liver (and kidneys) keeping the blood and lymph overloaded, which in turn overloads the skin. Inflammation in the skin is also often a reflection of inflammation in the bowel. Therefore a soothing, hydrating diet can be beneficial, alongside naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packs and enemas where appropriate to energise and clear the liver and bowel.

Sufferers are also advised to avoid common sources of irritation (e.g. wool and synthetic fibres, washing powders, nickel, rubber and the house dust mite). Food intolerance is an important factor and many sufferers notice an improvement in their symptoms when they eliminate one or more of the following foods from their diet: milk, wheat, red meat, sugar, tea, coffee and alcohol. Instead, the intake of oily fish (such as herring, mackerel and salmon) and alkalising foods such as green leafy vegetables and spirulina can be increased. Stress promotes eczema and inflammation, so adrenal support and relaxation techniques can be considered.

Aloe vera may be helpful both topically and orally to help calm inflammation and itchiness.Magnesium chloride solutions have also been found to be helpful topically.

 

Useful Supplements
 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Evening primrose oil
OR
Starflower (borage) oil

500-1000mg daily

1 g daily

Oils rich in gamma-linoleic acid which possess anti-inflammatory properties and may be highly effective at reducing the itching associated with eczema. It’s important to balance this with good levels of omega 3 PUFAs  (such as fish or krill oil supplements)

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

EPA and DHA have anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy properties, and are important for the health of the skin and the intestinal wall.

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily

Anti-inflammatory and beneficial for the health of the skin and intestinal wall. Zinc is known to be involved in the conversion of fatty acids to anti-inflammatory prostaglandins (hormone-like chemicals)

Magnesium citrate

200-600mg daily

To help hydrate skin, manufacture detoxification enzymes, adrenal support and counter effects of anxiety

Silicon

10mg

For skin health and structure

Vitamin E

400-800iu

Antioxidant for general skin health. One study linked low tocopherol levels in children with higher incidence of eczema.

Broad spectrum gut bacteria supplement

As indicated

To improve bowel flora balance and help resolve inflammation in the bowel and therefore in the skin

Aloe vera

Topically plus 1-2tbsp orally

Anti-inflammatory; cooling

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Anti-inflammatory

Spirulina or green powder formula

As indicated

Alkalising; anti-inflammatory

Vitamin D3

1000-5000iu

Anti-inflammatory

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/skin_news.pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter%E2%80%93Colon.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/nutrigold_newsletter_adrenal_support.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Spirulina_LoRes_For_web.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/eczema_cases_reported_in_the_uk_is_rising_by_42_per_year

 

Useful webinars

Eczema Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Managing Allergies the Naturopathic Way Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

ENDOMETRIOSIS

Endometriosis is a condition affecting around 1.5 million women in the UK in which the endometrium (womb lining) grows at sites outside the uterus e.g. the ovaries, fallopian tubes, ligaments, bowel or bladder. This endometrial tissue responds to the menstrual hormone cycle, swelling and multiplying in response to hormone levels, but is unable to be shed so instead forms adhesions, scarring and inflammation. Large patches of endometrial tissue can form cysts which may bleed during the cycle.. Women may exhibit a wide range of symptoms including pain on ovulation, pain during or after sexual intercourse, heavy or irregular bleeding, fatigue, depression, back pain, painful bowel and bladder movements, infertility and intestinal upsets.

The cause of endometriosis is not clear;  one theory suggests it is due to malabsorption caused by disruption of the gut flora and intestinal integrity following long-term treatment with antibiotics or steroids.  Genetic predisposition, environmental influences, excess oestrogen and poor oestrogen metabolism are also involved in the development of endometriosis.  Poor lymphatic circulation may play a role in the spread of endometrial tissue to further organs such as the eyes and lungs.  American research points to a higher incidence of allergic symptoms in sufferers, whilst certain nutritional deficiencies  play a part in adversely affecting the body's ability to deal with excess levels of oestrogen.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Sufferers should be encouraged to follow a diet relatively low in arachidonic acid (from red meats and dairy produce) and high in omega-3 essential fats from fish, krill and flax oil.  A wide variety of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables provide antioxidants and fibres to support detoxification and eliminatory pathways particularly in the liver and bowel.  Gluten contributes to the inflammatory process and compromises integrity of the digestive tract so it is advisable to reduce or avoid it as much as possible. Soaked nuts and seeds provide magnesium, zinc and selenium, all crucial for hormone balance and managing inflammation.  Beans, pulses and sprouted seeds are rich in phytoestrogen compounds which have a useful hormone balancing effect.  Hydration is important; reducing tea, coffee, alcohol and stimulant drinks and ensuring 1.5l of water and herb teas are included each day will support lymphatic circulation and liver and bowel health.

 The exposure to and accumulation of environmental toxins such as dioxins and BPA (Bisphenol A, found in plastic containers and bottles) is linked with endometriosis through their disruptive effects on hormone levels and the immune system.  Using natural toiletries, BPA-free containers and minimising household chemicals can reduce exposure to these toxins.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Comprehensive multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing significant levels of all the main nutrients especially the B complex vitamins, vitamin C and zinc, selenium and magnesium.

To provide antioxidant support and manage hormone balance.

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day

Krill provides EPA and DHA for mood balance and anti-inflammatory prostaglandins

Hop Alpha Acids

500mg-1000mg per day

Reduce pain and inflammation

Magnesium citrate

200-400mg per day

Support hormone and blood sugar balance, reduce cramps

Vitamin D3

2000-4000iu per day

Vitamin D3 plays a key role in regulating inflammation

Multi strain probiotic

As directed

Probiotic bacteria support liver detoxification and bowel function

Lecithin powder

3-12g per day

Phospholipids’ in lecithin support liver function

 

 

Useful articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9
 

 

Useful webinars

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/cpd_accredited_webinar_magic_magnesium_the_many_health_benefits_of_this_ess

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/managing_endometriosis_the_natural_way_cpd_webinar_by_sally_duffin

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/womens_health_webinar_by_kirsten_chick1
 

Note on Supplements

 


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

EYE DISORDERS

There are many eye defects or abnormalities which nutritionists believe can be traced to a deficiency of certain nutrients. Some of the common conditions are detailed below, whilst cataracts and glaucoma have separate listings.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

A diet rich in antioxidants/phytonutrients is advised, in particular bright yellow lutein-containing foods such as saffron and beta-carotene rich foods such as carrots – remember that beta-carotene is a pre-cursor to vitamin A, and carrots really do help with night vision.

Dry eyes can often be rectified by addressing hydration. Dry, sore and itchy eyes are viewed in Chinese medicine as a possible indication that the liver needs support. Highly processed foods, pesticides, caffeine, alcohol and high fat diets should be avoided.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin A, or antioxidant formula containing beta-carotene

As indicated

Poor vision at night may be caused by a deficiency of vitamin A resulting from malnutrition, malabsorption or liver disease.

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grapeseed, bilberry)

As indicated

These can significantly improve darkness adaptation

Vitamin C

1-2 g daily

Inflammation of the eye which becomes red and is usually caused by an infection or allergy. Antibiotic drops are usually prescribed but for recurring cases oral vitamin C can be useful.

Vitamin B complex

Daily

Soreness and cracking of the eyelids can be due to a vitamin B2 and B6 deficiency

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grapeseed extract, bilberry)

As indicated

For their anti-inflammatory effects

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf


Useful Webinars

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

FATIGUE

There are many causes for fatigue including stress, over-work, lack of sleep, inadequate diet, long term dieting and illness (e.g. ME, candidiasis, anaemia*). Any one or more of these factors can deplete the body of nutrients at a time when its requirements are higher. Fatigue is as a result of the body not being able to produce enough ATP – the energy currency of the cell. ATP is produced from bulk nutrients such as carbohydrates, protein and fats in the cells. This process requires the right type of fuel from food (see Diet and Lifestyle section) as well as cofactors including B vitamins, magnesium, Vitamin C and coenzyme Q10. The structure of ATP includes a naturally occurring sugar, ribose, and magnesium so these are key nutrients to support production of ATP.

Usually the adrenals benefit from some support, and sometimes also the thyroid and rest of the endocrine system need extra nourishment. Please see Nutrigold Adrenal Health newsletter for more information.

*Note: There are different kinds of anaemia. Iron-deficiency anaemia can often be corrected with the help of iron-rich meats, such as dark turkey, liver and beef, as well as gentle forms of iron supplementation. Black strap molasses is a good vegetarian/vegan source of iron. Thalassaemia, however, should not be treated with iron supplements, as the anaemia is due to the body not being able to make sufficient levels of haemoglobin from iron, so toxic iron levels may build up in the blood. Pernicious anaemia is usually treated with B12 injections.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Adequate rest and relaxation is key to re-energising along with eating the right fuels.

The diet should be hydrating and alkalising, and include plenty of fresh vegetables, together with healthy proteins (preferably low fat meats, fish or vegetarian alternatives such as quinoa, peas and beans) and good quality oils (e.g. organic flaxseed oil) to provide a steady energy supply. Complex carbohydrates (such as brown rice) should replace heavily processed carbohydrates such as white rice, white pasta and sugar.

Eating small regular meals can help to maintain constant blood sugar levels. For more information please see Nutrigold Optimising Energynewsletter.

Including iodine rich seaweeds in the diet may help nourish both the adrenals and the thyroid. Stimulants such as tea, coffee and alcohol (which only give a temporary boost to energy levels), sugar and smoking, should be avoided.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil

To improve cellular function

Ribose

1500-3000mg daily – can be found in part nutrient rich energy powder formulations (alongside B vitamins, CoQ10 and magnesium) that can be mixed with water for a tasty drink

Supports the production of ATP

Co-enzyme Q10 (in ubiquinol form)

60-90 mg daily

Supports the production of ATP - this a vitamin-like substance found in the mitochondria (energy generator) of every cell.

Magnesium (in citrate form)

300-600 mg daily

Energy boost and supports structure of ATP - diets low in this mineral can result in fatigue


B vitamins (B1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 12) and folic acid

As directed

Energy boost - B vitamins are fundamental in the conversion of carbohydrates into glucose which the body "burns" to produce energy

Vitamin C

1–2 g daily

Immune boost - vitamin C enhances immune function. The body\'s requirement for this vitamin increases during periods of stress

Iron (ferrous gluconate)

15mg daily together with vitamin C and A to help absorption

In cases of iron-deficiency anaemia

B5

460mg am and pm

Adrenal support

Organic spirulina powder

1-2tsp daily Mixed into fresh juices and smoothies and provides wide spectrum of trace minerals and alkalising properties

Iodine

Can be found in kelp supplements – as directed

Thyroid support

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/magnesium_could_be_the_missing_link_to_reducing_nations_back_problems

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf

Vitamin C

CoenzymeQ10

Adrenal Health

Super Spirulina

Supergreens

Optimising Energy – NEW!

 

Useful webinars


Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Supporting Immunity Webinar by Sally Duffin

 

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice. The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Female hair loss

Hair loss is common after a pregnancy due to the hormonal shifts taking place which disrupt the hair growth / shedding cycle; large amounts of hair may be shed before new hair is fully grown and this cycle can take a few months to settle back into a regular rhythm.  Low iron levels caused by pregnancy, heavy menstruation or stress, and hypothyroid function also affect hair growth.

Diet & Lifestyle

The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for hair formation and growth, thyroid function and hormone balance.  Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  Gentle forms of fibre from ground flaxseed and psyllium can aid hormone detoxification and elimination.  Foods rich in phytoestrogens such as chickpeas, flaxseeds, lentils, aduki beans, red clover sprouts and traditional soya foods (tempeh, tofu) support hormone balance.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

Immune function

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. B-vitamins nourish the nervous system and demand increases in times of stress. Selenium, zinc and vitamin E support thyroid function.

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Hair formation, iron absorption and collagen in blood vessels supplying hair follicles

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, immune function, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Iron gluconate

15mg per day

Maintain iron levels during pregnancy and menstruation, support thyroid function

Krill oil

500mg per day

Omega-3 oils support thyroid function and maintain scalp hydration

Flax oil

1000mg per day

Omega-3, 6 and 9 essential oils support thyroid function and maintain scalp hydration

Sprouted barley grass

As directed

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Spirulina

5-10g per day

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Multi-strain probiotic formula

As directed

Bowel regularity and nutrient absorption

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Pregnancy-Science.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful Webinars

Thyroid Function by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Women’s Health by Kirsten Chick

Pregnancy webinar by Kirsten Chick

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Fertility

Fertility refers to the ability to make a baby. Infertility (inability to have children) or subfertility (reduced ability) may be due to a problem with the man’s sperm quality, the woman’s ability to conceive and/or carry a successful pregnancy, or both. It can be caused by a variety of factors; some cases have been associated with poor nutrition, others with exposure to endocrine-disrupting toxins, electromagnetic stress and other environmental factors.

It may be necessary to address specific conditions such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. 

 

Diet & Lifestyle

A good fertility programme will usually involve efforts to both nourish and detoxify both partners, as the health and quality of life of the future child – and grandchildren - may be greatly affected by the health of the parents.

The diet needs to be hydrating and well balanced, with a good variety and quantity of vegetables. It may be particularly important to support the endocrine (hormonal) system, starting with adrenal support (including fish or krill oil, magnesium, vitamins C, B5 and B6).

It is advisable to make sure there are the nutrients required to make the prostaglandins necessary to help regulate the reproductive organs, as these are important for fertility, pregnancy and childbirth. These included omega 3 and 6 essential fatty acids such as EPA (from fish and krill oil) and GLA (from evening primrose oil), magnesium, zinc, and vitamins B3, B6, C and E.

There are also specific nutrients you can focus on for optimising sperm production and egg health (see Useful Supplements section below).

In detoxifying, it is important to minimise exposure to pesticides, fungicides, endocrine-disrupting chemicals in many plastics, cosmetics, detergents, air fresheners, perfumes etc., cigarette smoke, alcohol, recreational drugs and some medications. It may also be important to reduce exposure to mobile phones and laptops, especially where sperm counts or quality are poor.

The liver, which Traditional Chinese Medicine refers to as “the planner”, is fundamental to good health and planning a pregnancy, and so needs to be as clear and energised as possible. So a detox programme may benefit from some naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packs and coffee enemas, depending on the individual. Vitamin C, magnesium and zinc are among a number of nutrients important for making detoxification enzymes.

It is important to note that a detox programme or naturopathic cleanse of any kind must not be undertaken whilst actively trying to get pregnant or when pregnant. Taking a break from trying to become pregnant can take a huge amount of stress out of the picture too, and when you go back to trying you will hopefully be calmer, clearer and healthier than before.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil

For prostaglandins and general endocrine support

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing vitamin B complex and high levels of magnesium citrate

For prostaglandins, enzymes and general endocrine support

Vitamin C

1000-3000mg daily (1 with each meal)

For liver health, adrenal support, prostaglandin production, sperm health, general health of reproductive organs

Vitamin E

50 mg daily

Vitamins C and E work together to protect sperm and tissue throughout the body from damage

Selenium

350mg daily

Another important antioxidant

Zinc citrate

15-60 mg daily

Zinc is implicated in fertility

Amino acids (L-arginine, L-carnitine) (men only)

 

These are involved in spermatogenesis

Folic acid (women only)

400mcg

Needed to avoid neural tube defects to baby in first few weeks of pregnancy, often before the woman knows she is pregnant.

Iodine

Discuss with practitioner

For adrenal and thyroid support; iodine deficiency has been linked to higher rates of miscarriage

Vitamin D3

Up to 10,000 IU daily

Hormonal support

Co-enzyme Q10 (in ubiquinol form)

100-200mg daily

For egg health and sperm health

Spirulina or green powder formula

As indicated

To help alkalise the cells and balance pH throughout the body

Broad spectrum gut bacteria formula

As indicated

Bowel flora balance is important for liver health and successful detoxification

 

Relevant CPD Nutrition Courses

 

Fertility and Pregnancy Support course – an in depth guide to pre-conceptual care, fertility, pregnancy and breastfeeding with additional practitioner notes – includes Pre-conceptual Cleanse and Fertility Cleanse.


Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Preconceptual care, natural fertility and pregnancy management

Vitamin C – our shield from misfortune

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

Super Spirulina

Supergreens, oranges and golden yellows

 

Useful Nutrigold Articles

Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Painkillers Can Cause Infertility

Folic Acid Supplements for All Women

Vitamin D Crucial Missing Nutrient in Pregnancy

Simply Magnesium

The ABC of vitamin C

Chlorophyll – the alkalising molecule of life

Supergreen smoothies and juice recipes

Detoxifying the liver - phase 1 and 2 liver enzymes

The truth behind the need to detoxify

Detox: Fad Diet Or A Real Benefit To Our Health?

The Art of Detoxifying

Gut health affects liver health – So include both in your spring cleanse programme

Krill oil prevents fat accumulation in the liver

  

Useful Nutrigold Webinars

Pre-conceptual Care webinar by Kirsten Chick

Fertility Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

FIBROMYALGIA

(See also MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS)

Fibromyalgia literally means pain in the fibrous tissue and muscles, and is usually experienced as stiff and/or achy muscles, knotted muscles and pain all over. It is often accompanied by chronic fatigue, sleep problems and sometimes also digestive problems, headaches and itchy or burning skin.

The causes of fibromyalgia have not yet been discovered, but research has pinpointed issues in the central nervous system as well as in the peripheral tissues themselves, including reduced blood flow and high levels of chemicals that create irritation.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

A naturopathic approach would seek to calm inflammation and irritation, through adrenal support and an anti-inflammatory diet, rebalance electrolytes with a particular emphasis on magnesium (both to help muscles and the nervous system relax, and to create energy for basic functions throughout the body) and assist the body in gently detoxing and eliminating any toxins and acidity that may have built up. The diet would also need to gradually head towards one that was more alkalising and hydrating.

As the person is likely to be sensitive to any changes that happen too quickly, a gentle approach is advised, with an emphasis on naturopathic techniques to help support the body’s processes of elimination. These might include castor oil packs, Epsom salt baths (also magnesium rich) and enemas.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Magnesium citrate

Start with low dose, perhaps 50mg, and very slowly build up to 400-600mg

Muscle function; nerve function; adrenal support

Krill oil

500-1000mg

Contains antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances; adrenal support

Vitamin C

1000-3000mg daily (gradually build up)

Antioxidant; role in healthy tissue formation; adrenal support

Zinc citrate

15mg daily

Antioxidant; role in healthy formation

Vitamin B5 (Calcium pantothenate)

500mg twice daily

Adrenal support

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate)

20mg daily

Adrenal support

Vitamin D

2,000-5,000IU (gradually build up)

Anti-inflammatory

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Anti-inflammatory; natural pain relief

 

 

Useful articles

Joint and connective tissue health

Alpha acids and natural pain relief

The importance of supergreens

Optimum nutrition is the key to healthy, vibrant skin

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

Detoxification newsletter

Health benefits of krill oil

Benefits of vitamin C

 

 

Useful webinars

Focus on Fibromyalgia - CPD Webinar by Dr Philipps

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Antioxidants, Carotenoids, Flavonoids and Polyphenols CPD Accredited Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     
 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

 

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

FOOD ALLERGIES & INTOLERANCES

The word ‘allergy’ was first used in 1906 to describe any unusual reaction by the body to something from its environment; this included food, drink, dust and environmental chemicals.

Food allergies are now classed as either IgE-Mediated or Non-IgE-Mediated reactions; the distinction clarifying whether IgE cells in the immune system are involved in the reaction or not.  Food allergies can provoke dramatic and life threatening responses such as anaphylactic shock or more chronic reactions like eczema where mast cells in the skin are sensitised to the Ig-E antibodies and release large amounts of histamine, causing swelling, redness and itching.

Food intolerance describes a variety of reactions to foods which may or may not involve the immune system.  Lactose intolerance for example is caused by a lack of lactase enzyme which is required for the digestion of lactose, a milk sugar.  This type of intolerance is an enzyme deficiency and does not involve the immune system.  Research into the involvement of IgG antibodies in food intolerance reactions is ongoing.

Food intolerances commonly produce more chronic and life-limiting but not life threatening symptoms including headaches, digestive problems, joint pains and fatigue.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Discovering which food or foods are causing the symptoms is the key to managing food allergies and intolerances.  This can be done through an elimination diet process which seeks to remove as many potential allergens as possible then gradually reintroduce them one by one and notice which foods cause symptoms; or through various IgE and IgG blood and skin tests.  All tests have their limitations; false negative and false positive results can occur which can complicate the investigations.

Providing holistic support to the digestive and immune systems is crucial in order to encourage normal immune function and optimise the digestion of foods and absorption of nutrients.

Avoid caffeinated drinks as caffeine and methylxanthines impair nutrient absorption and can irritate the digestive tract; replace with 1.5l of water, herb teas and redbush tea.  Include a range of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables for their antioxidant contents; vitamin C has natural anti-histamine actions and alongside vitamins A and E and the minerals zinc and selenium supports healthy immune function. 

Dark green leafy vegetables supply magnesium and B-vitamins, necessary for energy production and adrenal support; adrenal fatigue or exhaustion can contribute to the development of food intolerances.  Vitamin B6 is necessary for effective histamine detoxification.

Nuts, seeds, oily fish and cold-pressed organic seed oils are rich in essential fats needed for immune function and reducing any inflammation triggered by allergies or intolerances. 

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing zinc 15 mg, vitamin C, vitamin B complex and selenium

Immune support, antioxidant protection, histamine detoxification and energy production.

Multi strain high strength probiotic formula

As directed

Regulate immune system and inflammation, absorption of nutrients, elimination of toxins

Plant based digestive enzyme formula

As directed, with meals

Provides enzymes necessary for the efficient digestion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates including lactose, gluten and plant fibres.

Whole leaf Aloe Vera juice

20ml twice a day before meals 20ml twice a day before meals

Supports bowel flora balance, digestive enzyme levels and the health of the intestinal tract. Anti-inflammatory.

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day

Provides EPA and DHA for anti-inflammatory prostaglandins

Magnesium citrate

200-400mg per day

Adrenal support, histamine detoxification, energy production

Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

Natural anti-histamine, immune support, detoxification.

 

Useful Articles 

Aloe Vera Newsletters

Caring and Cleansing the Colon

Digestive Enzymes

Bowel Flora

 

Useful webinars

Understanding Food Allergy

Digestive Enzymes – the key to optimum health

Living with Candida

Understanding Dysbiosis

Supporting Immunity

Nutritional Approaches to managing IBS

 

Courses 

Understanding Probiotics

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

FROZEN SHOULDER

Frozen shoulder sometimes begins with trauma or strain to the area, and sometimes appears to come out of the blue. It can be incredibly painful, with sharp stabbing pains at times and aching at other times. Movement is restricted, sometimes severely.

The cause is unknown, although observations have been made around prevalence with women over the age of 40, and perhaps alongside thyroid issues. Others have also observed that stiffness in the connective tissue may be due to over stimulation of fibroblasts by excess levels of reverse T3, which would indicate a thyroid imbalance where T4 is not being efficiently converted to T3.

Constriction anywhere in the body infers a state of calcium dominance in the muscles. In this state, magnesium will be low – magnesium together with co-enzyme Q10 are required to provide the energy to enable muscles to relax. Note that the most efficient form of co-enzyme Q10 is ubiquinol. 

 

Diet & Lifestyle

 

The shoulder needs to be completely rested until better. Some bodywork therapies and exercise may help if started early enough. 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

To improve cellular function

Co-enzyme Q10

60-200 mg daily

Energy boost - this a vitamin-like substance found in the mitochondria (energy generator) of every cell.

B5

460mg am and pm

Adrenal support

Iodine

Kelp supplements as indicated; you could also discuss higher dose iodine supplements together with selenium and other supporting minerals with your practitioner

Thyroid support

Hop alpha acids

 

To help reduce pain and inflammation

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-healthy-joints.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/magnesium_could_be_the_missing_link_to_reducing_nations_back_problems

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-healthy-joints.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf

 

Useful Webinars

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

  

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

GALLSTONES

Gallstones are an indication of fat mishandling and form when cholesterol and calcium separate from bile, crystallizing into stones.  Bile is a secretion, produced by the liver and stored in the gallbladder, which emulsifies fats so they can be digested easily. Its solubility is dependent on the correct balance being maintained between cholesterol, bile acids, phosphatidyl choline and water. If this balance is disrupted (e.g. increase in cholesterol or reduction in bile acids)  the composition of bile alters and the risk of stones forming can increase.

As bile is produced in the liver and then stored in the gallbladder, gallstones should  be considered a liver issue, not one caused by the gallbladder. Naturopathic liver support may include castor oil packs and coffee enemas where appropriate.

Symptoms of gallstones include nausea, vomiting, severe abdominal pain, shoulder pain, bloating and discomfort following a heavy meal of fatty or fried foods.  The stones may live silently in the gallbladder and even disperse of their own accord, or they may irritate the lining of the gallbladder causing cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder), lodge in the common bile duct, or block the pancreatic duct which can then lead to pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas).

Gallstones are largely attributed to the western diet of low fibre, low nutrient and highly refined sugary foods; this results in a reduction in bile acid levels which are essential for keeping cholesterol in solution .  Other causes include poor fat digestion and a narrow bile duct that impairs the free flow of bile into the duodenum.  Women aged over 40 who are overweight have an increased risk of developing gallstones.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

An alkalising diet is likely to have the biggest impact, with plenty of vegetables and perhaps a supergreen powder formula. High fat diets should be avoided, although coconut oil should present fewer problems due to the different way in which it is metabolised.

Lecithin may also be helpful in preventing (and some even suggest dissolving) gallstones, together with lipases and other digestive enzymes.

Dietary fibre has been found to decrease the formation of deoxycholic acid and promote its excretion through faeces, thereby increasing the solubility of cholesterol in the bile. Fibre, both insoluble and soluble, can be increased by eating more vegetables, beans, pulses, nuts, fruit.

Good hydration is important as water is a vital component of bile and aids cholesterol solution. 

It is wise to avoid poor quality calcium supplements as they may not be absorbed efficiently and may increase the levels of calcium in bile.

 

Useful Supplements


Supplement

How much?

Why?

Supergreen formula

As indicated

Alkalising, supports liver function

Magnesium citrate

300-600mg daily

Support effective calcium placement

High strength Lecithin granules

1-4tsp daily

Supplies phosphatidyl choline for bile formation and to prevent stone formation

Broad spectrum digestive enzyme formula

As directed

Supplies lipase to enhance fat digestion

Multi strain probiotic formula

As directed

Support cholesterol detoxification and elimination via the bowel

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Pain relief

Psyllium husks fibre

1-2 teaspoons per day in water

Fibre aids cholesterol elimination via the bowel

 

Useful Articles 

Bowel Flora

Benefits of Digestive Enzymes                                  

Caring and Cleansing the Colon

Lecithin & Plant Sterols


Useful webinars

 

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Digestive Enzymes – the key to optimum health

Understanding the highs and lows of stomach acid

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

GLAUCOMA

Glaucoma is the term for a group of conditions characterised by an increase in pressure of the fluid within the eye and hardening of the surface of the eyeball which results in damage to the optic nerve and eventual sight loss.

Diabetics and those with hypertension are at increased risk of developing glaucoma because of the alterations that can occur to the microcirculation in the eye as part of these conditions.

There are 4 main types of glaucoma:

Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG): the most common type, caused by fluid not draining from the anterior chamber at the front of the eye properly; the subsequent increase in ocular pressure affects the optic nerve. These changes occur gradually, with peripheral vision being affected first. POAG is more common with age, in people of African descent, in diabetics, people who are very short sighted or if you have an immediate family member with the condition.

Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma: a sudden, immediate change in ocular pressure characterised by pain and sudden sight loss.

Developmental Glaucoma: a rare condition affecting young babies.

Secondary Glaucoma: a side effect of other eye conditions, medications, operations or injuries.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

A healthy diet is recommended, with decreased meat and dairy product consumption, and increased intake of vegetarian sources of protein(nuts, seeds, eggs, beans and pulses), cold water fish and eggs. Fresh vegetables of varying colours should be increasedfor their antioxidant content.

Exercise (a 30 minute-long brisk walk every day) can improve overall circulation and may help reduce eye pressure.

Lutein, zeaxanthin and other antioxidants such as zinc, vitamin E and vitamin C have been shown to be helpful in some studies. High dose vitamin C and high dose B12 regimes may also be worth researching. Lutein and zeaxanthin are is richsupplied by in green, yellowand orange foods such as saffron, orange peppers,yellow peppers and and egg yolks;and green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale, watercressand broccoli. are the best sources of lutein and zeaxanthin. Zinc is found in pumpkin seeds, poultry, nuts and wholegrains whilst almonds, wheatgerm and sunflower seeds provide vitamin E.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Antioxidant formula containing lutein and zeaxanthin

As indicated

Antioxidant protection

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

Anti-inflammatory, general tissue health

Broad spectrum multivitamin & mineral formula that includes zinc citrate, selenium vit C and vit E

As indicated Antioxidant protection, tissue healing and repair

Organic Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

Antioxidant protectio

 

Useful Articles 

An Alphabet of Antioxidants

Health Benefits of Krill Oil

Understanding Food Supplements

 

Useful webinars

Eye Health

Antioxidants, Carotenoids, Flavonoids & Polyphenols

Supporting Senior Health

Update on Vitamin D – so much more than bone health!

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice. The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

GOUT

Gout is characterised by an excess of uric acid in the blood and deposits of uric acid crystals in joints, especially fingers and toes. These crystals cause the joint to become inflamed, associated with intense pain. Factors such as increasing age, obesity and poor diet increase susceptibility to gout.
 

Diet and Lifestyle

Alcohol and refined carbohydrates should be avoided since these increase uric acid production, and purine-rich foods such as organ meats, shellfish, meat, herrings and sardines should be kept to a minimum. A hydrating and alkalising diet is recommended to help prevent the build up of crystals in the kidneys. A detoxification programme may help reduce uric acid levels and prevent gout attacks – this might incorporate a cleansing diet alongside naturopathic techniques such as enemas and packing, together with magnesium citrate and perhaps a green powder supplement, such as spirulina or a blended formula. 
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

EPA and DHA have anti-inflammatory properties

Magnesium citrate

300-600mg daily

To help circulation and detoxification

Spirulina or green powder formula

As indicated

 

Hop alpha acids

 

To help reduce pain and inflammation

Vitamin D

1000-5000iu daily

To help reduce pain and inflammation

 

Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Simply magnesium

Benefits of krill oil

Super spirulina

Supergreens – the importance of daily alkalising

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

Detoxification newsletter

 

 


Useful articles

Fish and krill oil better than aspirin as anti-inflammatory

 

 

Useful webinars

CPD Webinar - Guide to Gout

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

GUM DISEASE

Gum disease or periodontal disease can include both Gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and Periodontitis (inflammation affecting the gums and surrounding bones). Severe cases can lead to gum recession and tooth loss.

Causes include chronic bacterial infection, a build up of plaque due to poor oral hygiene and smoking.  Amalgam fillings and thyroid imbalance are also risk factors for developing gum disease. 

Gum disease is most widespread amongst middle-aged people, although it can develop at any age. In children, sugary drinks and poor tooth brushing techniques are linked with the rise in tooth decay and gum problems. 

Periodontal disease is associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease, stroke and respiratory infections.  Oral bacteria can be aspirated into the lungs, leading to respiratory infections.  Inflammation and bacterial imbalance in the mouth is linked to inflammation in the cardiovascular system which increases the risk of heart attack and stroke.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

A healthy diet low in refined sugars and rich in antioxidant nutrients is recommended.   Including high fibre foods and bitter greens such as mustard greens, rocket and dandelion leaves can stimulate saliva secretions which contain natural antibacterial substances..  Brightly coloured fruits and vegetables provide a spectrum of antioxidant nutrients to support gum healing and circulation whilst oily fish, nuts, seeds and cold pressed seed oils supply anti-inflammatory omega-3 oils.  Fizzy drinks, fruit juices and alcohol must be avoided and replaced with water, milks and herbal teas.  Stevia and Xylitol can be used in place of refined sugar and syrups.   Improved dental hygiene habits, and dental supervision, are essential.

Inflammation may be countered through supplements such as krill or fish oil and zinc, as well as adrenal support, for example with vitamins B5, B6 or C alongside krill or fish oil and magnesium.  Adrenal support would also be the first step in approaching thyroid support.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Co-enzyme Q 10

30-200 mg daily

This is an essential factor in cellular energy formation and is essential for the health of tissues; it is deficient in diseased gum tissue

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine

Anti inflammatory and general tissue health

Vitamin C

1–3 g daily

Vitamin C and bioflavonoids are important for the production of collagen and for a healthy immune system. Decreased levels result in delayed wound healing and increased susceptibility to infection..

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily (before bed)

Anti-inflammatory and important for tissue health

Magnesium citrate

Magnesium citrate

To help circulation and detoxification

B5

1000-3000iu per day

Adrenal support

High Strength multi strain Probiotic

As indicated

To help promote healthy bacterial balance

Vit D3

1000-3000iu per day

Anti inflammatory, immune support

Hop Alpha Acids

As directed

Pain relief

 

Useful Articles 

Co-Enzyme Q10

Simply Magnesium

Krill Oil  

Cardiovascular Health

Alpha Acids and Natural Pain Relief
 

Useful webinars

How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick 

Supporting Immunity Webinar by Sally Duffin

Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Antioxidants, Carotenoids, Flavonoids & Polyphenols

Update on Vitamin D – so much more than bone health!
 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

 

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

HAEMORRHOIDS

Haemorrhoids (piles) are swollen, inflamed veins in the anus or rectum, resulting in itching, bleeding and pain.

Causes include a genetic weakness of the veins, pregnancy, and prolonged periods of standing or sitting. In some cases, an overloaded liver may increase sluggishness and toxicity in the blood, which may then put added pressure onto haemorrhoidal veins. In others, a low fibre diet may put an increased strain on the muscles during bowel movements and weakens the veins causing haemorrhoids to form.

Topical treatments such as suppositories and ointments generally only provide temporary relief from symptoms.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

The primary treatment for haemorrhoids is prevention. Adequate fluid intakes, good liver support and a diet containing appropriate levels of fibre (e.g. vegetables, fruits, beans, pulses, wholegrains) are crucial for the maintenance of proper bowel movements, encouraging peristalsis and reducing straining during defecation.

For liver support, castor oil packs to the liver may be recommended where appropriate, as well as coffee enemas if it is possible to do them without aggravating the haemorrhoids.

 

Bulking agents such as psyllium seed, soaked linseeds and oat bran can be useful because they have a mild laxative action – as long as they are taken with plenty of water.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Psyllium husks or soaked linseeds

As indicated, with plenty of water

To promote bowel function – the seeds attract water and form a gelatinous mass which act as a mild laxative without irritating the bowel

Fructo-oligosaccharides

As indicated

To promote bowel function – this soluble fibre is a prebiotic, and hydrates faecal matter making it softer and easier to pass

Vitamin C

500 mg three times daily

To maintain healthy tissue and promote healing

Anthocyanidins (e.g. bilberry, grapeseed extract)

As indicated

To maintain healthy veins; studies have shown a reduction in haemorrhoids with bilberry extract supplementation

Essential fatty acids (e.g. starflower oil, evening primrose oil, krill oil, fish oil, flax seed oil)

As indicated

To maintain healthy veins

Zinc

15 mg daily

To maintain healthy tissue and promote healing

Hop alpha acids

 

Pain relief

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter%E2%80%93Colon.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf  

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Detoxification.pdf
 

Useful Webinars

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

HAIR PROBLEMS

Healthy hair is dependent upon good blood circulation and nutrition. Deficiencies of certain nutrients are associated with poor hair growth and certain drugs, including the contraceptive pill, as well as stress and pregnancy, can cause hair loss. There is no effective treatment for hair loss in men, or greying hair in either sex however key nutrients can be used to support a healthy scalp, effective blood supply and provide the building blocks needed to maintain healthy hair growth. 
 
Each hair follicle grows its hair for around 3 years then rests for 3 months before shedding the hair and starting to grow a new one.  The rate of growth and shedding varies between individuals according to age, gender, lifestyle, nutrition and genetics determines how much hair you have.  

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Regular exercise is known to improve circulation, general well-being and reduce stress. Scalp massage can be an effective way to boost blood flow to the hair follicles, enhancing the delivery of nutrients.  The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for hair formation and growth. Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  Regular relaxation is essential as stress affects hair growth and health;  nutrients such as B-vitamins, zinc and vitamin C used for hair formation are diverted to support adrenal function and the manufacture of stress hormones.

 
Alopecia 
Alopecia is the loss of hair and affects up to 2 in 100 people at some point during their life.  It commonly first occurs in childhood or teenage years. Alopecia areata is the loss of patches of scalp hair.  It may go on to develop into alopecia totalis which is the total loss of scalp hair or alopecia universalis, the loss of all body hair including eyebrows, eyelashes and pubic hair.
The progression of alopecia is unpredictable; hair can regrow within a few months or new bald patches may appear whilst others are regrowing.
Alopecia is considered to be an auto-immune disease, with the body’s immune system mistakenly attacking hair follicles and causing hair loss.  Stress can exacerbate the condition.
 
Female hair loss
Hair loss is common after a pregnancy due to the hormonal shifts taking place which disrupt the hair growth / shedding cycle; large amounts of hair may be shed before new hair is fully grown and this cycle can take a few months to settle back into a regular rhythm.  Low iron levels caused by pregnancy, heavy menstruation or stress, and hypothyroid function also affect hair growth.
 
Male pattern baldness
Baldness affects most men to some degree during their life and is occasionally referred to as androgenetic alopecia as the condition is hereditary.  Scalp hair follicles shrink and produce thinner, weaker hair with a shorter life cycle than regular hair. Eventually follicles can only produce short hairs which do not grow through to the skins surface.  
Hair follicles produce 5-alpha reductase, an enzyme that converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and it is thought that sensitivity to DHT causes changes in the hair follicles leading to baldness.
 
Healthy locks!
Strong, soft shiny hair is dependent upon healthy circulation and a plentiful supply of good quality protein, essential oils, vitamins A, D, E and C, and minerals including silicea, zinc, selenium, sulphur and iron.  Hair is formed from keratin, a type of protein and is dependent on the presence of myriad other nutrients for healthy blood supply, strength, hydration, oil production and antioxidant protection.
 
Oily scalp
The production of natural hair oils is regulated by the sebaceous glands in the scalp.  Many people have naturally oily hair and skin though the condition can be aggravated by hormonal shifts during puberty, pregnancy and menopause or in hormonal conditions such as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.  A diet high in sugar, processed fats and refined carbohydrates affects the levels of hair oils.  
Supporting detoxification and elimination of hormones via the liver and bowels and ensuring good intake of essential fats may help regulate oil production.  Avoid harsh shampoos and conditioners as these strip away natural hair oils and encourage the sebaceous glands to produce more.
 
Dandruff
Dandruff is flaking of the scalp due to seborrhoeic dermatitis (inflamed skin in regions where there are natural oil producing glands).  It can be accompanied by a rash and in babies, is often referred to as ‘cradle cap’.  Stress exacerbates the condition and in some cases a fungal infection may be the cause.
 
Dry Scalp
A dry itchy scalp can be caused by seborrhoeic dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis or any kind of skin infection.  The scalp may be red, inflamed, sore and very itchy.  Stress aggravates these conditions so regular relaxation and adrenal support alongside incorporating nutrients for hair health is beneficial.
 
Head lice 
Head lice are tiny insects that live in hair.  Nits are the empty white shells left behind once a louse has hatched.  The lice are transmitted by head-to-head contact; they are unable to fly or jump and soon die once away from hair.  Occasionally they cause itchiness due to a lice allergy but mostly, sufferers are unaware of a problem until a friend or hairdresser spots the telltale signs!
‘Wet combing’ is a suitable method of lice detection; this involves washing hair as normal, coating it with regular conditioner and using a lice detection comb to methodically comb through the hair and find lice.  If lice are found, many chemical insecticide treatments are available or for natural alternatives, neem oil, coconut oil and various essential oils are very effective.  Aloe vera juice can be applied topically to reduce any redness or itching caused by lice allergy.
 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin A as beta carotene

4-10mg daily

For dull, dry, lustreless hair

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. B-vitamins nourish the nervous system and demand increases in times of stress.

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Hair formation, iron absorption and collagen in blood vessels supplying hair follicles

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Iron gluconate

15mg per day

Healthy blood supply to hair follicles and thyroid function

Krill oil

500-1000mg per day

Omega-3 oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Organic Flaxseed oil

1000-3000mg per day as capsules or 1-2tbsp of the oil

Omega-3, 6 and 9 essential oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Sprouted barley grass

As directed

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Organic Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Vitamin D

1000-4000IU per day

Immune function and anti-inflammatory

Multi-strain probiotic formula

As directed

Immune function and nutrient absorption

Whole leaf Aloe vera juice

Soak cotton wool pads in aloe juice and apply topically to scalp

Applied topically can reduce itching and irritation caused by head lice

Organic virgin Coconut oil

 

Applied topically can nourish a dry scalp and be used as part of head lice treatment

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/renew_your_natural_beauty_from_within

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful webinars

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Soothing Psoriasis by Kirsten Chick

Supporting Immunity by Sally Duffin

Thyroid Function by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

HAYFEVER

Hayfever or Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis describes a set of symptoms caused by an allergic reaction to pollen.  The symptoms include runny, itchy nose or a blocked stuffy nose; itchy watering eyes, sneezing, headaches, sore throat and coughing which appear with the onset of the pollen season.  Some people only react to tree pollens (these are predominant from early to late spring), others to grass (late spring through to July) or to flower and weed pollens (early spring to early autumn).  Hayfever affects around 2% of the population and often begins in childhood though it can develop at any point during life.  Many sufferers grow out of it after a few years.  People with asthma and eczema are more likely to develop hayfever and the three conditions are classed as atopic conditions or atopy.  Conventional treatment focuses on antihistamine drugs to block the release of histamine from the mast cells lining the nose and throat thereby reducing the symptoms.

Supplement

How much?

Why?

High strength multi-strain Probiotic

As indicated

To help repopulate the gut with “friendly” bacteria which regulate the immune system

Vit D3 oral spray

1000-3000IU per day

Modulate immune response

Zinc citrate

15mg per day

Immune support, antioxidant

Vitamin C with bioflavonoids or Mixed Ascorbates (buffered vit C suitable for people sensitive to ascorbic acid)

1–3 g daily

Important antioxidant to strengthen the immune system and reduce histamine

Aloe vera juice

As directed

Polysaccharides have anti-inflammatory actions; enhances nutrient bioavailability, supports the immune system and acemannon compounds have anti-histamine properties

Krill oil

500mg-1000mg per day

Anti-inflammatory effects of omega-3 oils

Supergreens powder

As indicated

Alkalising and antioxidant

High potency multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing good levels of B vitamins

Immune-boosting, supports energy production, antioxidant

 

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

Head lice

Head lice are tiny insects that live in hair.  Nits are the empty white shells left behind once a louse has hatched.  The lice are transmitted by head-to-head contact; they are unable to fly or jump and soon die once away from hair.  Occasionally they cause itchiness due to a lice allergy but mostly, sufferers are unaware of a problem until a friend or hairdresser spots the telltale signs!

 

Lifestyle

‘Wet combing’ is a suitable method of lice detection; this involves washing hair as normal, coating it with regular conditioner and using a lice detection comb to methodically comb through the hair and find lice.  If lice are found, many chemical insecticide treatments are available or for natural alternatives, neem oil, coconut oil and various essential oils are very effective.  Aloe vera juice can be applied topically to reduce any redness or itching caused by lice allergy.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Aloe vera juice

Soak cotton wool pads in aloe juice and apply topically to scalp

Applied topically can reduce itching and irritation caused by head lice

Coconut oil

 

Applied topically can nourish a dry scalp and be used as part of head lice treatment

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

 

Useful Webinars

Update on Aloe: 21st Century uses for this naturopathic staple by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

HEADACHES

There are several different types of headaches. Primary headaches include migraines, tension and cluster headaches and secondary headaches are often associated with referred head or neck pain or even overuse of headache medication. Ibuprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is known to be the cause of some headaches if taken regularly (i.e. rebound headaches). This leads to the absurd situation where taking medication to relieve headaches may actually be the cause of the pain!

There are also sudden onset headaches that are associated with haemorrhage and aneurysms (strokes), fever headaches such as seen with encephalitis and meningitis and fatigue and head pains associated with carbon monoxide poisoning. Sudden onset headaches need immediate medical attention.

Primary headaches often result from muscle contraction in the back and neck and resulting blood flow problems to the head. Misaligned vertebrae in the spinal column and tense muscles in the shoulders and neck all contribute to development of headaches. Hormone imbalances, stress and nutrient deficiencies, especially magnesium, all contribute to the condition.


Diet and Lifestyle

Many people take NSAIDs like aspirin or ibuprofen to control headaches. Side effects of regular NSAID use includes increased risk of gastric bleeding, stroke, cardiovascular problems and even infertility. Leading neuroscientists have suggested that 5-10% of the population may suffer from rebound headaches from taking NSAIDs 2-3 times each week. Some opioid analgesics like codeine may also contain caffeine in the formulation, which may worse headaches. A natural alternative to reducing inflammation and associated pain can be found with using hop alpha acids.

Dehydration can cause headaches so it is recommended to drink 1.5-2L filtered water each day. Replace fizzy soft drinks, alcohol, caffeine and decaffeinated drinks with herbal teas, water and fresh juices.

A whole food diet rich in alkalising foods such as vegetables, provides the necessary nutrients like B vitamins and helps improve digestion. Imbalances in gut bacteria and poor liver detoxification all contribute to some types of headaches. Green leafy vegetables steamed and in fresh juices provide magnesium, the mineral that helps muscles relax thus easing tension in shoulder and neck muscles. Some headaches may be linked to food allergies or intolerances such as gluten, food colourings and preservatives (e.g. nitrites found in processed meats and sulphites found in canned foods and red wine), caffeine, alcohol, cheese and chocolate. Identifying trigger foods may help in part of the headache management programme.

Headaches, including migraines may be triggered by hypoglycaemic (low blood sugar) episodes. Avoiding processed, sugary foods, eating little and often including some protein with each meal and snack will help balance blood sugar levels.

Managing stress and daily workload is also important to help reduce tension. Take time each day, even if it’s just 10-15mins, to stop and unwind. Simply closing your eyes and breathing deeply for 10 minutes is a great way to reduce tension and regain focus and clarity. Other holistic therapies include acupuncture, massage, yoga and t’ai chi.

Regular walks in the fresh air and daylight are also important. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for headache frequency and severity and has been associated with non-migraine headaches.

Coenzyme Q10 supplements, in the ubiquinol form, have been linked to reducing migraine attacks.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Hop alpha acids

500-1000mg daily

Reduces inflammation and associated pain without side effects associated with NSAIDs

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To reduce muscle tension and support ATP (cellular energy) production and liver detoxification enzymes

B vitamins (B1,2,3,5,6,12, folic acid)

As directed

Increases ATP production to improve cell function, blood flow etc. Vitamin B2 is a natural migraine prophylactic – B vitamins should be taken together as they have natural synergistic actions

Coenzyme Q10 in ubiquinol form

60-100mg daily

Linked to reducing migraine attacks

Antarctic Krill

500-1000mg daily

Improves blood flow and reduces inflammation

Mixed strain gut bacteria

25 billion live organism daily

Supports digestion

Spirulina

1-3tsp daily

Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, supports liver detoxification

 

Broad spectrum plant digestive enzyme

As directed

To improve digestion

Lecithin powder

1-2tsp daily

Supports liver detoxification

Vitamin D

2,000-4,000IU daily

Linked to reducing frequency and severity or headaches

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_may_be_causing_your_headache

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_increase_risk_of_stroke_think_twice_before_popping_a_painkiller

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_cause_gastric_ulcers

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/non_steroidal_anti_inflammatory_painkillers_can_cause_infertility

 

Useful Newsletters 

Lecithin and Plant Sterols
 
Benefits of Krill Oil

Super Spirulina

Digestive Enzymes - The Key to Optimum Health

CoEnzyme Q10

Wherewithal To Detoxify

Importance of Supergreens

Bowel Flora

Calming and Cleansing the Colon

Optimising Energy

Vitamin D

 

Useful webinars

Focus on Diabetes

Natural Approaches to Headache Treatment and Prevention

Essential Guide to a Successful Detox

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach

How and Why We Need to Support the Body’s pH Balance 2

Liver and Gall Bladder Health

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health

Understanding Dysbiosis

Update on Aloe: A 21st Century Naturopathic Staple

Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

Fatty Liver Disease: A 21st Century Health Epidemics

Liver & Gall Bladder Health

Understanding Dysbiosiss

What’s so cute about CoQ10

Successful Slumber

Adrenal Support

Stroke

Update on Vitamin D: So Much More Than Bone Health

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

 Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

Healthy locks!

Strong, soft shiny hair is dependent upon healthy circulation and a plentiful supply of good quality protein, essential oils, vitamins A, D, E and C, and minerals including silicea, zinc, selenium, sulphur and iron.  Hair is formed from keratin, a type of protein and is dependent on the presence of myriad other nutrients for healthy blood supply, strength, hydration, oil production and antioxidant protection.
 

Diet & Lifestyle

Regular exercise is known to improve circulation, general well-being and reduce stress. Scalp massage can be an effective way to boost blood flow to the hair follicles, enhancing the delivery of nutrients.  The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for follicle health, hair formation and growth.  Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

Immune function

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. B-vitamins nourish the nervous system and demand increases in times of stress.

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Hair formation, iron absorption and collagen in blood vessels supplying hair follicles

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, immune function, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Krill oil

500mg per day

Omega-3 oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

 

Flax oil

1000mg per day

Omega-3, 6 and 9 essential oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Sprouted barley grass

As directed

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Spirulina

5-10g per day

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Vitamin D

At least 1000iu per day

Immune function and anti-inflammatory

Multi-strain probiotic formula

As directed

Nutrient absorption

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful Webinars

Thyroid Function by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Women’s Health by Kirsten Chick

Supporting Immunity by Sally Duffin

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements:
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here



Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

HEPATITIS

Hepatitis is a liver disease which causes nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, weight loss, fatigue, fever, muscle aches, dark urine, vomiting and jaundice, usually caused by viral infection (Hepatitis A, B and C).

Hepatitis A – infectious viral hepatitis spread via contaminated food or water or some sexual contact. Generally not as serious as Hep B or C; usually acute (recovery within a few months) rarely progressing into chronic hepatitis

Hepatitis B – viral origin spread via blood and sexual contact – this virus is commonly called a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) but can also be transmitted during poor tattoo processes, sharing toothbrush or razor with infected person or even infection of baby through mother’s milk. Can progress into serious chronic hepatitis where liver swells and long term damage results in cancer.

Hepatitis C – similar to type B with viral transmission via blood or drug use such as infected needles. Can cause chronic hepatitis. Liver cancer risk only increased if cirrhosis is also present (only about 20% Hep C patients get liver cirrhosis)

However, hepatitis can also be caused by alcohol and some other toxins and infections (e.g. Hepatitis D, E, X and G), as well as from our own autoimmune process.

In all cases of hepatitis hepatocytes (liver cells) function is compromised, sometimes chronically and severely, affecting the myriad of important liver functions such as fat metabolism and detoxification (see Nutrigold newsletters and webinars listed below for more information on liver function).

 

Diet and lifestyle

During acute attacks, bed rest is essential. Alcohol, saturated fats, fried oils and animal fats increase the toxin content in the liver and gall bladder, and should be avoided, as should refined foods (particularly those laden with sugar) and dairy products. A high fibre diet may help to eliminate bile acids and toxic bile substances from the liver. Vegetables provide important fibre levels and antioxidant support

Naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packs and coffee enemas may be recommended where appropriate.

High dose intravenous vitamin C is a common alternative treatment, and research provides strong evidence for vitamin D supplementation too. 

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Lecithin (phosphatidyl choline)

1-2tsp (approx 5-10g) daily

Phosphatidyl choline (PC) supports hepatocyte (liver cell) function and also has immunosupportive effects. Look for a powder or granule with at least 25% PC content

Multi B vitamins including vitamin B12 and folic acid

As indicated

B vitamins may be deficient in cases of hepatitis and support liver function

Broad spectrum antioxidant support

As indicated

A mix of water soluble (e.g. Vitamin C), fat soluble (e.g. Vitamin E), antioxidant minerals (e.g. zinc) and phytonutrients (e.g. quercetin) helps support hepatocytes and decrease damage caused by viral infection

Selenium

Up to 200mcg daily

Important antioxidant and may decrease incidence of hepatitis

Vitamin D3

1000-5,000IU daily

Studies show strong anti-viral action in hepatitis C patients

Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol)

Build up to to 100mg daily

Hepatitis patients have been found to have low levels of ubiquinol

Vitamin C with bioflavinoids

1000mg 3 times a day

Immunomodulation action and may decrease duration of the disease


Useful Articles

Lecithin and Plant Sterols

Vitamin D

Benefits of Vitamin C

CoEnzyme Q10

Detoxification

The Wherewithal to Detoxify

Importance of Supergreens

 

Useful webinars

 

Fatty Liver Disease: A 21st Century Health Epidemic by Dr Elisabeth Philipps 4pm 19th March 2014

Liver & Gall Bladder Health

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach

How and Why We Need To Support The Body’s PH Balance

 

Nutrigold Update Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/is_choline_deficiency_damaging_your_liver

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

 Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

HYPERACTIVITY

The term "hyperactive" is often applied to children who are restless, excitable, have a short attention span, cry frequently or who have frequent temper tantrums. Food allergy, “leaky gut” and bowel flora imbalance have each been implicated as a major contributory factor in some children, along with exposure to chemicals and nutrient deficiencies.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

The most common food allergies include cow's milk, food preservatives and colourings, chocolate, eggs, citrus fruits, wheat/gluten.

Sometimes all grains are problematic, and sometimes all complex carbohydrates can pose a problem due to their effect on bowel flora and general gut health. The gut is known as the enteric nervous system, and has an important relationship with the brain. To address this, it may be useful to look at approaches such as GAPS and the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Probiotics and fermented foods (such as sauerkraut and kefir) may be useful here.

Exposure to solvents contained in aerosols, felt tip pens and cleaning fluids should be minimised.

A number of studies have pointed to the benefits of DHA (in marine fish oil and krill oil) in reducing behavioural symptoms in hyperactivity disorders. High levels of copper have also been associated with hyperactivity, so zinc supplementation may be useful to help redress the balance. Phosphatidyl choline, found in lecithin granules or raw egg yolks, has been studied for its role in improving cognitive function.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500mg krill oil or 1000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

These essential fatty acids are known to be required by the growing brain

Zinc citrate

15mg daily

Zinc deficiency has been associated with hyperactivity

Probiotics

As indicated

For bowel flora balance

Lecithin granule

1tsp daily

For phosphatidyl choline

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/british_toddlers_fussiest_eaters_in_europe

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/fish_oils_and_the_brain_behaviour_adhd_and_autism

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/NG-Education-Newsletter-Fish-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Phosphatidyl-Serine.pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf 

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2. pdf

 

Useful Webinars

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Managing Allergies the Naturopathic Way Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Webinar by Barbara Wren - Understanding the importance of preserving the correct blood brain barrier
 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

HYPERTENSION (HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE)

High blood pressure (hypertension) is  associated with diet and lifestyle factors, including high intakes of sodium (salt), protein, sugar,  caffeine, alcohol and  processed fats; lack of exercise, smoking and obesity. . If high blood pressure persists, it can cause kidney disease, stroke, and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. .

Blood pressure is regulated by the renin-angiotensin system, a series of hormones and enzymes (in the kidneys, adrenals, liver, lungs and hypothalamus working on a feedback system activated by the kidney’s response to low blood pressure. If this system is overactive, then blood pressure will remain high, and many blood pressure medications work to suppress the renin-angiotensin system.

Many factors contribute towards an imbalance in the renin-angiotensin system; a common association is a high sodium diet.  The kidneys regulate levels of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium very tightly and sodium is retained at the expense of potassium.  A high level of sodium encourages water retention as sodium attracts water.  This mineral and fluid imbalance influences the renin-angiotensin system and blood pressure increases.

Sustained high blood pressure will put pressure on the artery walls, eventually causing damage and inflammation that can  lead to atherosclerosis, aneurysms and/or embolisms. Atherosclerosis is where cholesterol and calcification builds up in response to damage on the arterial walls, causing narrowing of the arteries, which then adds to the high blood pressure. Many believe that this mixture of cholesterol and calcification is there to strengthen the artery walls and prevent them from bursting under the strain of blood pressure, and it has been noted that this does not occur where arteries pass through bony structures that give them similar protection. If this putty-like mixture then breaks off, it can form an embolism or clot which lodges in the bloodstream, cutting  off the blood supply to parts of the heart or brain, and resulting in tissue death, i.e. a heart attack, stroke or TIA (Transient Ischaemic Attack or “mini-stroke”).

It has also been noted that there is often an increased resistance, i.e. stiffness, in the smaller artery (arteriole) walls at the body’s extremities.

High blood pressure  puts pressure on the heart muscle, causing it  to become stiffer, thicker, and weakened from overwork.

Symptoms of high blood pressure include headache, dizziness, shortness of breath, blurred vision and swollen feet and ankles – although many people do not experience many or any obvious symptoms.

High blood pressure during pregnancy can be a sign of pre-eclampsia and must be monitored closely.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

A healthy diet, which places emphasis on potassium and magnesium rich foods  fruits and vegetables in particular as these also contain huge varieties of antioxidant compounds that protect blood vessels from damage;  polyunsaturated fats and fibre, is recommended. Oily fish, nuts and seeds are excellent sources of omega-3 essential fats, renowned for their anti-inflammatory and circulatory benefits.  Refined, processed foods, high protein diets, high salt foods, sugar and caffeine are to be minimised.  Hydration is very important for supporting kidney function and fluid balance. . Studies have demonstrated that amongst vegetarians, there is a lower incidence of hypertension. Risk factors such as smoking and excess weight should be avoided, and regular exercise considered, taking into account overall health.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin C with bioflavonoids


1–2 g daily

For arterial health

High potency antioxidant


Including beta carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium

For arterial health

Vitamin E


400 IU daily

For arterial and heart health

Krill oil or fish oil (containing EPA and DHA). This is not the same as cod liver oil.


500-1000mg daily krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil (always take with protein)

For heart and arterial health and to prevent blood clotting – do not take if on blood thinning medication such as aspirin, warfarin or heparin, as the combination may thin blood too much

Potassium citrate


500mg daily

Studies show dietary and supplemented potassium may lower blood pressure

Co-enzyme Q10 (ubiquinol)


60-200mg

Powerful antioxidant and supports cardiovascular output.

Magnesium citrate

450-600 mg daily To support arterial flexibility, kidney functions and heart health.

Vitamin D

1000 - 4000iu per day

Vitamin D plays a key role in regulating inflammation

 

Useful Articles & Newsletters

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

IMPOTENCE

Impotence (or erectile dysfunction) is the term used to describe the condition experienced by men who cannot acquire or maintain an erection during 75% of sexual intercourse attempts. 1 in 10 men experience this worldwide. Anything that limits blood flow to the penis can cause impotence, including smoking, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, alcoholism, drug abuse and many commonly prescribed medications. In fact, 70% of cases of erectile dysfunction are associated with heart disease or diabetes, and men who smoke more than 20 cigarettes a day have a 50% higher risk of impotence. Impotence is more common as men get older, and can also be associated with depression and stress.


Diet & Lifestyle

An overall healthy lifestyle is recommended. Regular exercise is known to improve general well-being and reduce stress. The diet should include plenty of vegetables, fibre and fresh fruit, whilst alcohol should be avoided. A weight reduction programme may help if this is a problem.

Magnesium and co-enzyme Q10 may help improve circulation, as may gingko biloba. L-arginine has been shown to improve erectile dysfunction in 30-40% of patients, and in 90% when taken together with a West African bark extract called yohimbine. A diet containing sensible amounts of nuts, meat, fish and seafood will provide some magnesium, coQ10 and l-arginine, but supplementation may also be beneficial.


Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

L-arginine

3-5g daily

Together with yohimbine if possible

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To help improve circulation

Coenzyme Q10 in ubiquinol form

100-200mg daily

To help improve circulation

Zinc citrate

15-60 mg daily

Zinc is necessary for the male reproductive system

Ginkgo biloba extract

120 mg daily

This herb helps to maintain circulation of blood to the brain and extremities has been shown to provide some benefit to men suffering from impotence

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500mg krill oil or 3-4000mg fish oil

These can improve blood circulation, which may be a factor in impotence

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/zinc

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/NG-Education-Newsletter-Fish-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf 

 

Useful Webinars

Fertility Webinar by Kirsten Chick

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

INDIGESTION

Indigestion (upset stomach or dyspepsia) usually happens when people eat too much, too fast, or eat foods that don't "agree" with them. Indigestion may also be the result of insufficient or excessive secretion of digestive enzymes or stomach acid; the shape of the digestive organs, hernia (hiatus) or may be stress-related.  Dysbiosis of gut bacteria can also be a contributing factor.  Since it can affect the absorption of nutrients from food, it is important,  to establish the cause.

 

Diet and lifestyle

Good eating habits such as smaller more regular meals, eating  slowly and mindfully, chewing thoroughly, sitting down in relaxed surroundings, sitting with a straight back, not slouching, and avoiding foods known to provoke an attack are the keys to overcoming indigestion. Fats are harder to digest, so it may help to temporarily reduce fat intake in the diet. Some people also find it useful to eat animal proteins and carbohydrates at separate meals, as these require different conditions in the digestive tract to break them down.

Many herbs and mild spices have properties beneficial to the health and activity of the digestive tract.  Including cloves, garlic, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, parsley, aniseed and fennel as herb teas or ingredients in meals can support digestion. Small amounts of fermented foods, such as sauerkraut and kefir, may be helpful in balancing gut bacteria which aid the breakdown of food.

A generally alkalising and hydrating diet will help to ensure that conditions in the digestive system are conducive to proper digestion. It is advisable to drink fluids away from meals and have just a small glass of water (no more than 250ml) alongside food in order to avoid diluting digestive secretions.  It may also be helpful to look at some naturopathic techniques to support  liver function, such as castor oil packing.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Peppermint oil capsules

As directed May be helpful in relieving indigestion and easing trapped wind

Zinc citrate

15-60mg daily


Required to produce stomach acid

Broad spectrum enzyme formula

1 capsule with each meal or as directed

To assist with the balance of healthy bowel flora

Aloe vera

10-50ml per day either neat or dilute in a small amount of water

To assist with healthy bowel flora production and general digestive health and activity

Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

To assist with pH balance (alkaline cells are better able to produce acid for the digestive tract)

B complex

Low dose

Some B vitamins, such as B3 and folic acid, may be useful for indigestion prevention

Apple Cyder Vinegar

1 tablespoon dilute in water before main meal

To support pH balance and production of digestive secretions

 

Useful Articles

 

Useful webinars

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

INFERTILITY

Fertility refers to the ability to make a baby. Infertility (inability to have children) or subfertility (reduced ability) may be due to a problem with the man’s sperm quality, the woman’s ability to conceive and/or carry a successful pregnancy, or both. It can be caused by a variety of factors; some cases have been associated with poor nutrition, others with exposure to endocrine-disrupting toxins, electromagnetic stress and other environmental factors.

It may be necessary to address specific conditions such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. 

 

Diet and Lifestyle

A good fertility programme will usually involve efforts to both nourish and detoxify both partners, as the health and quality of life of the future child – and grandchildren - may be greatly affected by the health of the parents.

The diet needs to be hydrating and well balanced, with a good variety and quantity of vegetables. It may be particularly important to support the endocrine (hormonal) system, starting with adrenal support (including fish or krill oil, magnesium, vitamins C, B5 and B6).

It is advisable to make sure there are the nutrients required to make the prostaglandins necessary to help regulate the reproductive organs, as these are important for fertility, pregnancy and childbirth. These included omega 3 and 6 essential fatty acids such as EPA (from fish and krill oil) and GLA (from evening primrose oil), magnesium, zinc, and vitamins B3, B6, C and E.

There are also specific nutrients you can focus on for optimising sperm production and egg health (see Useful Supplements section below).

In detoxifying, it is important to minimise exposure to pesticides, fungicides, endocrine-disrupting chemicals in many plastics, cosmetics, detergents, air fresheners, perfumes etc., cigarette smoke, alcohol, recreational drugs and some medications. It may also be important to reduce exposure to mobile phones and laptops, especially where sperm counts or quality are poor.

The liver, which Traditional Chinese Medicine refers to as “the planner”, is fundamental to good health and planning a pregnancy, and so needs to be as clear and energised as possible. So a detox programme may benefit from some naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packs and coffee enemas, depending on the individual. Vitamin C, magnesium and zinc are among a number of nutrients important for making detoxification enzymes.

It is important to note that a detox programme or naturopathic cleanse of any kind must not be undertaken whilst actively trying to get pregnant or when pregnant. Taking a break from trying to become pregnant can take a huge amount of stress out of the picture too, and when you go back to trying you will hopefully be calmer, clearer and healthier than before.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil

For prostaglandins and general endocrine support

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing vitamin B complex and high levels of magnesium citrate

For prostaglandins, enzymes and general endocrine support

Vitamin C

1000-3000mg daily (1 with each meal)

For liver health, adrenal support, prostaglandin production, sperm health, general health of reproductive organs

Vitamin E

50 mg daily

Vitamins C and E work together to protect sperm and tissue throughout the body from damage

Selenium

Up to 100mcg daily

Another important antioxidant

Zinc citrate

Up to 25mg daily

Zinc is implicated in fertility

Amino acids (L-arginine, L-carnitine) (men only)

 

These are involved in spermatogenesis

Folic acid (women only)

400mcg

Needed to avoid neural tube defects to baby in first few weeks of pregnancy, often before the woman knows she is pregnant.

Iodine

Discuss with practitioner

For adrenal and thyroid support; iodine deficiency has been linked to higher rates of miscarriage

Vitamin D3

Up to 4,000IU daily

Hormonal support

Co-enzyme Q10 (in ubiquinol form)

Up to 100mg daily

For egg health and sperm health

Spirulina or green powder formula

As indicated

To help alkalise the cells and balance pH throughout the body

Broad spectrum gut bacteria formula

As indicated

Bowel flora balance is important for liver health and successful detoxification

 

Relevant CPD Nutrition Courses

 

Fertility and Pregnancy Support course – an in depth guide to pre-conceptual care, fertility, pregnancy and breastfeeding with additional practitioner notes – includes Pre-conceptual Cleanse and Fertility Cleanse.

 

Useful articles

Preconceptual care, natural fertility and pregnancy management

Vitamin C – our shield from misfortune

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

Super Spirulina

Supergreens, oranges and golden yellows

Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Painkillers Can Cause Infertility

Folic Acid Supplements for All Women

Vitamin D Crucial Missing Nutrient in Pregnancy

Simply Magnesium

The ABC of vitamin C

Chlorophyll – the alkalising molecule of life

Supergreen smoothies and juice recipes

Detoxifying the liver - phase 1 and 2 liver enzymes

The truth behind the need to detoxify

Detox: Fad Diet Or A Real Benefit To Our Health?

The Art of Detoxifying

Gut health affects liver health – So include both in your spring cleanse programme

Krill oil prevents fat accumulation in the liver

  

 

Useful webinars

Pre-conceptual Care webinar by Kirsten Chick

Fertility Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used to describe chronic inflammatory diseases of the bowel. There are two major types; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Crohn's disease is usually characterised by abdominal pain, diarrhoea (which may be bloody), vomiting, weight loss and fever, and often with adhesions within the bowel. Ulcerative Colitis gives rise to inflammation and ulceration of the colon with diarrhoea, tiredness and lack of energy. IBD can occur at any age but is most frequent between the ages of 15 to 35 years. The exact causes of IBD are unknown, but may include genetics, nutritional deficiencies, immune system malfunction or infectious agents.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

It is important to ensure the diet is well-balanced, hydrating and soothing. Food allergies/sensitivities have been implicated (especially wheat and dairy). Vitamin D deficiency has also been strongly implicated with IBD. Although a high fibre diet is often recommended, too much fibre may sometimes be as aggravating as too little, especially high bran breakfast cereals.

 

Useful Supplements

Gut healing and repair (aloe vera juice, probiotics, botanical colon support supplement, fish oils or Krill oil, antioxidants). Digestion and nutrient absorption (plant digestive enzymes, probiotics, aloe vera juice). Systemic inflammation and nutrient deficiencies (Vitamin D3, multivitamin and mineral, iron, hop alpha acids).

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin D3


Up to 5,000IU daily


Deficiency associated with IBD; anti-inflammatory


 

High potency multi-vitamin/mineral supplement;


Providing vitamins such as B vitamins and essential minerals including zinc citrate and magnesium citrate

Zinc deficiency is a known complication of Crohn's disease, and magnesium deficiency is prevalent in people with IBD. Both may also contribute to countering inflammation in the gut.

Krill oil or marine fish oill

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg fish oil daily

Anti-inflammatory

Iron (e.g. gluconate form)

15-45mg daily, if required

To counter deficiency caused by poor absorption. Take with vitamin C and A to enhance absorption

Mixed strain probiotics

25 billion daily

To help restore a balance of beneficial bowel flora

Broad spectrum plant digestive enzymes

1 capsule with a main meal. 1-2 capsules daily

Plant enzymes support digestion of a wider range of foods compared to human pancreatic enzymes and across a wider pH range found throughout the digestive tract. They are essential to increase nutrient bioavailability from food. A broad-spectrum plant enzyme formula should contain a mix of proteases, carbohydrases and lipase including gluten digesting proteases, amyloglucosidase to digest plant sugars that may cause bloating, and phytase to break down phytic acid in plant material enhancing mineral bioavailability.

Botanical colon support supplement

2-4 capsules daily with food

A blend of botanicals including prebiotic FOS, garlic, peppermint and fennel alongside psyllium husks and Bifido bacteria support colon health encourage regular eliminations of toxic waste from the colon and growth of beneficial bacteria.

Broad spectrum antioxidant support

2 capsules daily

A mix of water soluble (e.g. Vitamin C), fat soluble (e.g. Vitamin E), antioxidant minerals (e.g. zinc) and phytonutrients (e.g. quercetin) helps support gut tissue healing and repair from inflammatory damage.

Aloe vera juice

10-50mls daily

Aloe vera juice has an anti-inflammatory role, supports growth of beneficial gut bacteria and plays a role in digestion, including digestion of protein.

Hop alpha acids

500-1000mg daily, if required

Help reduce inflammation and pain in joints and with arthritis. Avoids damage to gastrointestinal lining associated with Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin.

 

Nutrigold Newsletters

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health

Adrenal Support

Aloe Vera

Benefits of Aloe Vera

Bowel Flora

Calming and Cleansing the Colon

Digestive Enzymes – The Key to Optimum Health

Vitamin D

Benefits of Vitamin C

Importance of Supergreens

Alpha Acids and Natural Pain Relief

 

Nutrigold CPD Accredited Webinars

NEW! Caring for Crohn’s Disease: A Naturopathic Approach

Inflammatory Bowel Disorders

Understanding Dysbiosis

Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

How and Why We Need To Support The Body’s PH Balance

Naturally Managing Pain

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution

Update on Vitamin D

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health

Understanding Dysbiosis

Update on Aloe: A 21st Century Naturopathic Staple

Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

 

Nutrigold Update Articles

 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/krill_oil_reduces_inflammation_in_ulcerative_colitis

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

INSOMNIA

Insomnia (inability to sleep) can be caused by factors including tension, emotional upset, caffeine or alcohol consumption, depression, hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) and physical pain. Chronic psychological factors may need to be addressed. Insomnia also frequently accompanies menopausal symptoms.

The pineal gland is involved in regulating our day/night cycle, and responds to light/darkness, so black out blinds in the bedroom may be useful, as well as avoiding light stimulation from television, computer and device screens close to bedtime. The pineal gland may also be prone to calcification – and fluoridation – magnesium, boron and vitamin K2 may be useful in addressing this alongside general endocrine support.

General endocrine support would begin with adrenal support, and helping to rebalance the adrenals’ output of cortisol may help to bring sleep patterns back into line.

Keeping the gut healthy also has its advantages. The gut (intestines) is an important part of the nervous system, and contains the same neurotransmitters as the brain, including those that affect mood, behaviour and sleep patterns. Bacteria imbalance, inflammation and irritation in the gut may therefore disrupt sleep patterns as well as levels of anxiety/contentment.
 

Diet and Lifestyle

A healthy diet and regular exercise provides well-being and improves sleep quality. Large meals eaten late at night, and caffeine and alcohol should be avoided, since these may impair the quality of sleep. A light protein snack, however, such as a handful of soaked nuts or seeds, may help to keep blood sugar stable overnight and so avoid frequent waking.

Regular sleep patterns are incredibly helpful, while shift work can disrupt not just sleep but hormonal rhythms in general. Gentle breathing and meditation before bed may help, and any practices that resolve stress.

Nutritionally, good hydration, a well balanced diet and magnesium may be beneficial, together with a small amount of fermented foods (e.g. sauerkraut, tempeh, miso, kefir) and/or a gut bacteria supplement. In addition to providing good adrenal support, this approach also assists with gut health.Magnesium is also essential in enabling muscles to relax, which many people find a problem when trying to sleep.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Sedative herbs (e.g. valerian, passionflower, hops, camomile)

 

 

 

Magnesium citrate

250–500 mg daily

To help with calcium placement, and general relaxation and reduction of stress/anxiety throughout the body

Calcium pantothenate (B5)

Taken last thing at night

Calcium is renowned for its calming and relaxant properties, and pantothenic acid (B5) is soothing and calming to the adrenals

Good quality multivitamin and mineral

 

General endocrine support

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil

For gut health, adrenal support and general endocrine support

Broad spectrum gut bacteria

As indicated

Gut health

 

Useful articles

Adrenal support

Biomedical menopause

Alpha acids and natural pain relief

Simply magnesium

Vitamin B5

 

Useful webinars

Successful Slumber
Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

 

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

Irritable bowel syndrome (spastic colon) is characterised by abdominal cramping, bloating, diarrhoea or constipation, often accompanied by fatigue, depression and anxiety. It is poorly understood, but may be caused by stress, food intolerance or digestive enzyme insufficiency.

Diet and Lifestyle

A balanced, alkalising diet, including plenty of and fluids (1.5-2 litres daily) is recommended. Alcohol, coffee, strong spices and food additives which stimulate excessive contraction of the bowel muscles should be avoided. Some people find that symptoms are triggered by particular foods (e.g. wheat, dairy products).

Mild spices can be very soothing, in particular turmeric. When taken together with black pepper, the piperol increases the potency of the turmeric powder. Peppermint oil is for many the most effective immediate soother for bloating and spasms.

There are many natural anti-inflammatories in the diet and in supplement form that may be helpful, and steps should be taken to promote a healthy balance of gut bacteria and optimal production of digestive enzymes, including:

  • A hydrating and alkalising diet
  • Including small amounts of fermented foods such as kefir, tempeh, miso, sauerkraut
  • eating mindfully in a peaceful environment and chewing well

Useful Supplements


Supplement

How much?

Why?

Broad spectrum gut bacteria

  To help repopulate the body\'s intestinal flora with beneficial bacteria (especially beneficial for diarrhoea)
Digestive enzymes   To help digest foods and reduce irritation and inflammation
Lactobacillus acidophilus   This probiotic helps to repopulate the body\'s intestinal flora with beneficial bacteria (especially beneficial for diarrhoea)
Krill oil or marine fish oil 500-1000mg krill oil or 3000-4000mg fish oil Anti-inflammatory
Aloe vera 5 - 20g For prebiotic activity and to help establish favourable bowel ecology and functioning
Magnesium citrate 200 - 600mg daily Anti-spasmodic
Fructo-oligosaccharides 5 - 20g For prebiotic activity and to help establish favourable bowel ecology and functioning
Herbal antispasmodic complex (e.g. valerian, hop, hawthorn, passiflora)   For their known soothing properties
Pantothenic acid (B5)   This is essential for proper functioning of the gastrointestinal tract.
Peppermint oil capsules   Peppermint oil has a well-proven anti-spasmodic effect on the stomach and intestines
Spirulina 5-10g daily Anti-inflammatory
Plant sterols   Anti-inflammatory
Hop alpha acids   To help reduce pain and inflammation  

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter%E2%80%93Colon.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Education_Newsletter_Digestive_Enzymes_04122013.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/golden_turmeric_has_been_shown_to_support_ibshttp://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/aloe_vera_great_for_the_whole_digestive_system
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/5_top_tips_to_beat_the_bloat
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/nutrients/detail/vitamin_b5_pantothenic_acid_calcium_pantothenate
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_LoRes_SinglePages_(2).pdf

Useful webinars

Nutritional Approaches for Managing IBS - CPD Webinar By Dr Philipps
Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health CPD Accredited Webinar
Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice. The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements pleaseclick here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

KIDNEY STONES

Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis or urolithiasis) form when salts in the urine crystallise out of solution. They result in pain, blood in the urine, urgency of urination, nausea and vomiting. Most kidney stones are formed of calcium-containing material, primarily calcium oxalate. Stones can also be made of other substances, such as uric acid, struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate), or cystine.

Factors contributing to kidney stone formation vary greatly between individuals, depending on urine pH, dietgenetic background, lifestyle influences and overall stress levels.  Stress can dehydrate the body at a deep cellular level and affect the effectiveness of our sodium potassium pump, leading to an overall increase in cellular pH acidity and overall toxicity.   It’s believed that insufficient potassium levels in the diet, coupled with excess salt (sodium) and excessive levels of inorganic calcium supplementation(particularly calcium carbonate), insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables and a deficiency in magnesium all play an important part in kidney stone formation.  Both potassium and magnesium are depleted by the continued use of diuretic drinks such as tea, coffee, soft fizzy drinks and alcohol.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

It is very important to drink plenty of fluids, approximately two litres daily ,ideally as purified water not unfiltered tap water (do not drink more than a pint in any one hour, take luke warm rather than too hot or too cold). Fresh green juices or supergreen powders help promote the correct alkaline pH at cellular level. 

Tea, coffee, soft and fizzy drinks and alcohol should be reduced or stopped completely.  Salt, especially table salt, should not be added to foods, and high-salt convenience foods and dairy avoided. 

Kidney stones are strongly influenced by diet; it is vital that dietary changes are undertaken with medical supervision, according to the exact type of stone. If the stone type is oxalate, it may be necessary to reduce intake of oxalic acid found in tea, coffee, spinach, rhubarb and beetroot, and limit intake of animal protein. For uric acid stones, a diet high in citrus fruits and vegetables which produces alkaline urine helps prevent stones forming, and as a point of interest, citrate minerals are noted to protect the body against kidney stone formation.  We also strongly recommend that people with kidney stones avoid supplementing the diet with extra, non organic calcium supplements (particularly high dose ones 1000mg etc), even if accompanied by Vitamin D.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To assist with calcium placement

Vitamin B-6

100mg-200mg daily ideally as a multi B complex

Together with magnesium has shown some effectiveness with oxalate stones

Potassium

200mg – 400mg daily

See above

Supergreens

Varies dependant on source

To help change pH

Supergreens

Varies dependant on source

To help change pH

Krill Oil

500mg – 1000mg daily

To help with calcium placement

Phosphatidyl Choline

500mg- 1000mg daily

May help dissolve stones

Probiotic

Ideally a potent multi strain probiotic, 20 billion potency plus.

To help degrade oxalates in the gut before they reach the kidneys

Hop Alpha Acids

As indicated

Pain relief

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/a_matter_of_chalk_and_kidney_stones

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

 

Useful Webinars

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

LEAKY GUT SYNDROME

Leaky gut syndrome is a condition where large spaces develop between the cells of the gut wall causing excessive permeability. Undesirable agents can then cross into the bloodstream such as harmful bacteria (e.g. salmonella), yeasts (e.g. Candida albicans), large allergenic food molecules, toxins and chemicals (e.g. food additives). Malabsorption can also occur; many nutrients have to be actively transported across the gut wall, and these sites can be damaged leading to nutritional deficiency. Leaky gut syndrome has been associated with food allergies (eczema, asthma, migraine), chronic fatigue and autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Multiple Sclerosis)

 

Diet & Lifestyle

Gluten and casein are common offenders that may damage the gut wall, and so many may find at least some benefit  from excluding gluten-rich grains and dairy from their diet. Anything that contributes to inflammation in the gut, such as the nightshade family (potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers and aubergines), may also be reduced or avoided. Refined foods, damaged fats, salt, sugar, alcohol, caffeine and other stimulants should be kept to a minimum.

At the same time, efforts must be made to soothe and heal the gut. Bone broths may be helpful here. When making the broth, add kombu or wakame seaweed for increased iodine intake, as this may also be helpful. Build up supplements gradually.


Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil

Gut wall health; anti-inflammatory

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily (take before bed or separate from food and other supplements

Gut wall health; anti-inflammatory

Magnesium citrate

150–450 mg daily

Gut wall health

Selenium

200-400mcg daily

Gut wall health

Vitamin C

1000mg daily

Gut wall health

Aloe vera

As indicated

Anti-inflammatory; gut wall health

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/skin_news.pdf

 

Useful Webinars

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

LUPUS

Lupus is an auto-immune disorder with a variety of symptoms including joint pains, severe fatigue, hair loss, poor circulation, low mood and a red butterfly shaped rash which occurs on skin frequently exposed to sunlight, most commonly the nose and cheeks.  The name ‘lupus’ derives from the Latin for ‘wolf’ as the rash was initially thought to mimic a wolf bite.

There are 2 classifications of lupus;

-      Discoid lupus erythematosus; causes skin redness and lesions.

-      Systemic lupus erythematosus; symptoms affect the whole body.

As with all auto-immune conditions, lupus affects more women than men and is influenced by hormonal changes; symptoms can be triggered by or, conversely, eased by fluctuations in oestrogen levels during puberty, pregnancy and menopause. 

Symptoms of lupus are characterized by phases of exacerbation and remission and are unique to the individual.  Treatments include non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, steroid drugs and hydroxychloroquine; in mild cases of lupus no treatments may be necessary at all.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Reduce pro-inflammatory foods and foods which impair nutrient absorption; gluten (wheat, barley, rye and some types of oats); refined sugar, dairy produce, processed meats, red meat, caffeine and alcohol.

Include plenty of oily fish, nuts, seeds, cold pressed seed oils and avocadoes for their healthy fats.  Eating a wide variety of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables provides a range of antioxidant nutrients to support immunity and skin healing.  Broccoli, kale, spinach, eggs and ground flaxseeds supply nutrients and phytoestrogen compounds to support oestrogen metabolism and detoxification. Beans, pulses, organic chicken, turkey, fish and eggs supply proteins necessary for immune support and skin repair.  Drink at least 1.5l of water each day, alongside herb teas, redbush tea and grain based alternatives to coffee.

Relaxation practices (deep breathing, mindful meditation, guided relaxation) and gentle forms of exercise like Yoga and Tai Chi are known to reduce the effects of stress (a common trigger factor for auto-immune conditions) and modulate the inflammatory response.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing zinc 15 mg, vitamin C, vitamin B complex and selenium

Immune support, antioxidant protection, energy production, skin healing.

Multi strain high strength probiotic formula

As directed

Regulate immune system and inflammation, absorption of nutrients, elimination of toxins

Whole leaf Aloe Vera juice

20ml twice a day before meals

Supports bowel flora balance, anti-inflammatory and skin healing.

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day

Provides EPA and DHA for anti-inflammatory prostaglandins

Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

Prebiotic, immune balancing, detoxification and rich supply of antioxidant compounds

Vitamin D3

1000-3000IU per day

Regulate immune system, anti-inflammatory

 

 

Useful Articles 

Aloe Vera Newsletters

Optimum Nutrition and Healthy Skin

Bowel Flora

Health Benefits of Krill Oil

Is nutrient deficiency impairing your immune system?

Polysaccharides may be important in supporting immune function

 

 

Useful webinars

Understanding Dysbiosis

Supporting Immunity

Update on Vitamin D – so much more than bone health!

Antioxidants, Carotenoids, Flavonoids & Polyphenols

Update on Aloe: 21st Century uses for this naturopathic staple

 

Note on Supplements


If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Male pattern baldness

Baldness affects most men to some degree during their life and is occasionally referred to as androgenetic alopecia as the condition is hereditary.  Scalp hair follicles shrink and produce thinner, weaker hair with a shorter life cycle than regular hair. Eventually follicles can only produce short hairs which do not grow through to the skins surface.  
 
Hair follicles produce 5-alpha reductase, an enzyme that converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and it is thought that sensitivity to DHT causes changes in the hair follicles leading to baldness.
 

Diet & Lifestyle

Regular exercise is known to improve general circulation and scalp massage can be an effective way to boost blood flow to the hair follicles, enhancing the delivery of nutrients.  The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for hair formation and growth.  Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

Immune function

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. B-vitamins nourish the nervous system and demand increases in times of stress.

Plant sterols including beta-sitosterol

As directed

Plant sterols shown to reduce conversion of testosterone to DHT

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Hair formation, iron absorption and collagen in blood vessels supplying hair follicles

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, immune function, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Sprouted barley grass

As directed

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Spirulina

5-10g per day

Excellent source of protein and antioxidant nutrients

Vitamin D

At least 1000iu per day

Immune function and anti-inflammatory

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

Lecithin & Plant sterols Newsletter

 

Useful Webinars

Supporting Senior Health by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Male Health Part 1: Prostate Health by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

MENOPAUSE

Menopause is a natural phase in a woman’s life, denoting the end of her childbearing years and the beginning of the next phase of her life journey.  It is caused by a gradual decline in oestrogen production by the ovaries.   This drop in oestrogen halts egg maturation and release, which in turn stops progesterone production and eventually, menstrual cycles stop altogether. 

This drop in hormone levels can bring many uncomfortable symptoms including hot flushes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, mood swings, depression, anxiety, low libido, insomnia, palpitations and lack of memory and concentration.

A common orthodox view of menopause is to see it as an ‘oestrogen deficiency condition’, and has been ever since the early 1940’s when the first hormone-replacement therapy drug ‘Premarin’ was produced from mares urine.  Since then, many studies have highlighted the negative effects of HRT including increased risk of stroke, heart attacks and certain cancers. 

The naturopathic nutritional approach to menopause encompasses support for hormone balance and detoxification, nutrients for bone and cardiovascular health and key nutrients for energy production and adrenal function to ensure a smooth transition through this natural phase.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Avoid caffeinated drinks as caffeine can trigger hot flushes even post-menopausally; replace with 1.5l of water, herb teas and redbush tea.  Include a range of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables for their antioxidant contents; vitamin C, bioflavonoids and carotenoids support vascular health, bone health, cholesterol balance and adrenal function.  Dark green leafy vegetables supply magnesium, vitamin K and B-vitamins, necessary for hormone balance, calcium absorption and heart health.  Nuts, seeds, oily fish and cold-pressed organic seed oils are rich in essential fats needed for cholesterol balance, heart and bone health and weight balance. Ground flaxseeds, alfalfa sprouts, mung bean sprouts, traditional soya foods (tofu, miso, and tempeh) and aduki beans contain phytoestrogen compounds that exert a weak oestrogenic action, reducing the effects of the sudden decline in endogenous oestrogen levels.  

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing zinc 15 mg, vitamin C, vitamin B complex 50–100 mg, vitamin K, manganese and chromium

Hormone balance, mood balance and energy production. Bone health. Conversion of fatty acids.

Soya isoflavones

As directed

Support bone health and oestrogen balance

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day

Krill provides EPA and DHA for anti-inflammatory prostaglandins to support joint health

Vitamin E

400iu per day

Antioxidant protection and reduce hot flushes

Magnesium citrate

200-400mg per day

Calcium and magnesium support bone mineralisation, hormone and blood sugar balance.

Calcium citrate

100-200mg per day

Calcium and magnesium support bone mineralisation, hormone and blood sugar balance.

Vitamin D3

At least 1000iu per day

Aid bone health, support immunity, mood balance and manage inflammation.

Multi strain probiotic

As directed

Probiotic bacteria support liver detoxification and bowel function

Lecithin powder

3-12g per day

Phospholipids’ in lecithin support liver function and cholesterol balance

Coenzyme-Q10 as Ubiquinol

30-60mg per day

Energy production; crucial if taking statins as the drugs block CO-Q10 manufacture.

 

Useful articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/one_in_ten_women_feel_much_worse_on_statins

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_soya_bean_isoflavones

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Menopause.pdf

 

Useful webinars

 

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

MIGRAINES

There are several different types of headaches. Primary headaches include migraines, tension and cluster headaches and secondary headaches are often associated with referred head or neck pain or even overuse of headache medication. Ibuprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is known to be the cause of some headaches if taken regularly (i.e. rebound headaches). This leads to the absurd situation where taking medication to relieve headaches may actually be the cause of the pain!

There are also sudden onset headaches that are associated with haemorrhage and aneurysms (strokes), fever headaches such as seen with encephalitis and meningitis and fatigue and head pains associated with carbon monoxide poisoning. Sudden onset headaches need immediate medical attention.

Primary headaches often result from muscle contraction in the back and neck and resulting blood flow problems to the head. Misaligned vertebrae in the spinal column and tense muscles in the shoulders and neck all contribute to development of headaches. Hormone imbalances, stress and nutrient deficiencies, especially magnesium, all contribute to the condition.

Diet and Lifestyle

Many people take NSAIDs like aspirin or ibuprofen to control headaches. Side effects of regular NSAID use includes increased risk of gastric bleeding, stroke, cardiovascular problems and even infertility. Leading neuroscientists have suggested that 5-10% of the population may suffer from rebound headaches from taking NSAIDs 2-3 times each week. Some opioid analgesics like codeine may also contain caffeine in the formulation, which may worse headaches. A natural alternative to reducing inflammation and associated pain can be found with using hop alpha acids.

Dehydration can cause headaches so it is recommended to drink 1.5-2L filtered water each day. Replace fizzy soft drinks, alcohol, caffeine and decaffeinated drinks with herbal teas, water and fresh juices.

A whole food diet rich in alkalising foods such as vegetables, provides the necessary nutrients like B vitamins and helps improve digestion. Imbalances in gut bacteria and poor liver detoxification all contribute to some types of headaches. Green leafy vegetables steamed and in fresh juices provide magnesium, the mineral that helps muscles relax thus easing tension in shoulder and neck muscles. Some headaches may be linked to food allergies or intolerances such as gluten, food colourings and preservatives (e.g. nitrites found in processed meats and sulphites found in canned foods and red wine), caffeine, alcohol, cheese and chocolate. Identifying trigger foods may help in part of the headache management programme.

Headaches, including migraines may be triggered by hypoglycaemic (low blood sugar) episodes. Avoiding processed, sugary foods, eating little and often including some protein with each meal and snack will help balance blood sugar levels.

Managing stress and daily workload is also important to help reduce tension. Take time each day, even if it’s just 10-15mins, to stop and unwind. Simply closing your eyes and breathing deeply for 10 minutes is a great way to reduce tension and regain focus and clarity. Other holistic therapies include acupuncture, massage, yoga and t’ai chi.

Regular walks in the fresh air and daylight are also important. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for headache frequency and severity and has been associated with non-migraine headaches.

Coenzyme Q10 supplements, in the ubiquinol form, have been linked to reducing migraine attacks.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Hop alpha acids

500-1000mg daily

Reduces inflammation and associated pain without side effects associated with NSAIDs

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To reduce muscle tension and support ATP (cellular energy) production and liver detoxification enzymes

B vitamins (B1,2,3,5,6,12, folic acid)

As directed

Increases ATP production to improve cell function, blood flow etc. Vitamin B2 is a natural migraine prophylactic – B vitamins should be taken together as they have natural synergistic actions

Coenzyme Q10 in ubiquinol form

60-100mg daily

Linked to reducing migraine attacks

Antarctic Krill

500-1000mg daily

Improves blood flow and reduces inflammation

Mixed strain gut bacteria

25 billion live organism daily

Supports digestion

Spirulina

1-3tsp daily

Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, supports liver detoxification

 

Broad spectrum plant digestive enzyme

As directed

To improve digestion

Lecithin powder

1-2tsp daily

Supports liver detoxification

Vitamin D

2,000-4,000IU daily

Linked to reducing frequency and severity or headaches

 

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_may_be_causing_your_headache

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_increase_risk_of_stroke_think_twice_before_popping_a_painkiller

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_cause_gastric_ulcers

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/non_steroidal_anti_inflammatory_painkillers_can_cause_infertility

 

 

Useful Newsletters 

Lecithin and Plant Sterols
 
Benefits of Krill Oil

Super Spirulina

Digestive Enzymes - The Key to Optimum Health

CoEnzyme Q10

Wherewithal To Detoxify

Importance of Supergreens

Bowel Flora

Calming and Cleansing the Colon

Optimising Energy

Vitamin D

 

 

Useful webinars

Focus on Diabetes

Natural Approaches to Headache Treatment and Prevention

Essential Guide to a Successful Detox

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach

How and Why We Need to Support the Body’s pH Balance 2

Liver and Gall Bladder Health

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health

Understanding Dysbiosis

Update on Aloe: A 21st Century Naturopathic Staple

Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

Fatty Liver Disease: A 21st Century Health Epidemics

Liver & Gall Bladder Health

Understanding Dysbiosiss

What’s so cute about CoQ10

Successful Slumber

Adrenal Support

Stroke

Update on Vitamin D: So Much More Than Bone Health

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

 Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

MOUTH ULCERS

Mouth ulcers are common, and extremely painful. They are usually self-limiting, healing in 7 - 15 days, although they often recur. Stress is thought to be a factor, and nutrient deficiencies are often implicated since almost 50% of sufferers in one trial were found to have iron, folate or vitamin B12 deficiencies. When these deficiencies were corrected, the incidence of ulcers was reduced. Food sensitivity is another possibility, particularly to wheat, cheese, chocolate, coffee, strawberries, tomatoes, peanuts and almonds. Some medications may cause mouth ulcers. Mouth ulcers may also be present alongside other symptoms in conditions such as ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn’s disease.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

A healthy, balanced diet is recommended, low in sodium, sugar and gluten, as well as any foods noted to contribute to ulcers.

Swilling whole leaf aloe vera around the mouth may help to soothe the ulcers and reduce inflammation.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Zinc

15 mg daily

Tissue healing; anti-inflammatory

Vitamin C

1–2 g daily

Tissue healing

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing iron and good levels of B vitamins

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Aloe-Magazine-Two.pdf


Useful Webinars

Supporting Immunity Webinar by Sally Duffin
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (M.S.)

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the nervous system whereby communication between the brain and other parts of the body is disrupted.

Vitamin D deficiency has been noted to be a major factor, with children born in spring having a higher incidence (i.e. the pregnant mother had less exposure to the UVB rays we need to produce vitamin D in the skin), and where twins have been studied, the twin with MS has generally had lower exposure to sunshine.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

Diet and lifestyle may have a significant impact on the progression of the illness. A reduction in saturated fat intake and the use of essential fatty acids, as found in krill oil, marine fish oils and evening primrose oil, may be of help. Meat intake should be reduced and the antioxidant nutrients vitamin E and selenium are sometimes recommended.
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin D3

2-10,000 IU daily

Deficiency strongly linked to MS

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

Provide essential fatty acids for nerve health

Evening primrose oil

500mg daily

Provide essential fatty acids for nerve health

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To help with calcium placement and therefore nerve signal transmission

Vitamin B complex

 

B vitamins, especially B1 and B12, are paramount in nerve health

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf

updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

 

Useful Webinars

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Supporting Immunity Webinar by Sally Duffin
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

  

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

 

MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is a long-term condition causing a variety of symptoms, the most common of which are fatigue, muscle pain, depression, headaches and mental confusion. A milder form of this condition is called post-viral fatigue syndrome; this usually subsides within a year. The exact cause of ME is not yet fully understood although it seems likely that viral infections or stress precipitate the illness, and it is often possible to see a pattern of depletion and adrenal and/or thyroid exhaustion before M.E is diagnosed.

 

Diet and lifestyle

Rest is essential; a common mistake is to feel better and then relapse when normal activity is resumed. A healthy diet high in alkalising vegetables is recommended, with regular small amounts of protein to support blood sugar. Allergies, Candida overgrowth and hypoglycaemia have been associated with ME, so it is advisable to avoid yeasty foods, sugar, artificial additives or chemicals, tea, coffee and alcohol. Gluten and dairy are often problematic, and may contribute to bacterial imbalance and inflammation in the gut and throughout the body.

The liver and lymph often need support, so naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packing, enemas, dry skin brushing and hot/cold showers may be useful where appropriate.

Often a picture of adrenal fatigue will precede M.E., and so it is advisable to put in some adrenal support, including vitamins C, B5 and B6, building up to eventual thyroid support, perhaps looking at gradually increasing iodine and its co-factors.

Another factor crucial for energy production is magnesium status, together with CoQ10 in ubiquinol form. Magnesium deficiency may also contribute to the neck tension and headaches often experienced with ME, and also a reduced ability to clear the body’s toxic load as magnesium is needed to make important detoxification enzymes. Magnesium’s role in calcium placement in the body may also impact greatly on muscle and nerve cell activity, and therefore also levels of pain and hypersensitivity to touch, light and sound. It may also be sensible to test for vitamin D deficiency.

There are a great deal of supplements that may be useful for someone with ME, and there is a temptation to take large quantities of these. However it is important to build up supplements gradually while putting in naturopathic support for the liver and lymph, as suggested above, so that supplementation does not present an additional stress to an already struggling system.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

 

How much?

 

Why?

Co-enzyme Q10

60-200 mg daily

Involved in energy release

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate)

20-40mg daily

Adrenal support, and to assist magnesium

Magnesium citrate

400-650 mg daily 

For fatigue and to help relax tension and tight muscles

Vitamin B5 (pantothenate)

500-1000 mg daily

Adrenal support

Krill oil or marine fish oil

Anti-inflammatory; central nervous system health; adrenal support 500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-3000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

Vitamin C

1-3g daily Adrenal support

Probiotic

Good quality broad spectrum, take as indicated Rebalance bowel flora and general bacteria

Vitamin D3

1000-5000iu daily Anti-inflammatory, gene regulator

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing a spectrum of B vitamins, magnesium citrate, zinc citrate, selenium and a range of other vitamins and minerals  

Spirulina

1tsp-1tbsp daily Alkalising, magnesium rich

Digestive enzymes

Good quality broad spectrum, take as indicated Assist digestion and therefore absorption of nutrients; support general gut health

Hop alpha acids

As indicated Pain relief, e.g. where there are headaches

Useful Articles

Krill oil: http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf 

CoQ10: http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf        

Magnesiumhttp://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium 

Adrenal Support: http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/nutrigold_newsletter_adrenal_support.pdf 

Vitamin C: http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf

Digestive enzymes: http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Education_Newsletter_Digestive_Enzymes_04122013.pdf

Bowel flora: http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf

Detoxification enzymes: http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Wherewithal-To-Detoxify.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Naturopathic Approach to Case Management CPD Accredited Webinar

CPD Accredited Webinar: Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

CPD Accredited Webinar - Whats so cute about CoQ10

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Supporting Immunity Webinar by Sally Duffin

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

Living with Candida - CPD Webinar By Sally Duffin

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health CPD Accredited Webinar

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

Family Predisposition Influencing Current Health Webinar by Barbara Wren

Webinar by Barbara Wren - Understanding the importance of preserving the correct blood brain barrier

Natural Approach to Headache Treatment and Prevention 

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE (NAFLD)

Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is a condition where fat accumulates in the liver (i.e. steatosis). Where the liver tissue becomes inflamed, fibrotic and scarred, the condition may be diagnosed as Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH), and then cirrhosis may occur when scar tissue starts to replace the liver cells. This can lead to an increased risk of stroke, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

There may be no symptoms apart from indications in blood tests and scans, although there is sometimes nagging pain in the liver area (upper right abdomen) and fatigue.

Diet and Lifestyle

A diet excessively high in carbohydrates and sugars may be a contributing factor, as the liver will convert these to triglyceride fats. Fructose is a particular offender here, and so fruit juices, agave syrup and anything sweetened with high fructose corn syrup is advisable to avoid. Refined carbohydrates, such as white bread, cakes biscuits and pasta, should also be avoided.

Choline, on the other hand, has been shown to help prevent fat accumulation in the liver. Lecithin powder/ granules are a good source of choline.

Oxidative stress from resulting from inflammation may cause further liver cell damage, as may toxins produced by a poor balance of gut bacteria. Dietary antioxidants can be found in high levels in vegetables and fruits (see below). Coenzyme Q10, an important antioxidant and nutrient required in the cellular process to make ATP (i.e. energy), is also often depleted in NAFLD. Supplement Coenzyme Q10 as ubiquinol, as this is the more bioavailable form.

To balance gut bacteria and support gut health, reduce gluten, dairy, caffeine and alcohol and try not to overeat or rush mealtimes. Eat small amounts of fruit as snacks only and not with other foods, as if they are unable to be digested quickly, they may putrefy in the gut. Including some fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, miso and tempeh, may also be helpful.

Other foods to avoid include heated and poor quality vegetable/nut/seed oils, fried foods, margarines and excessive animal fats. However organic virgin coconut oil has been shown to not contribute to steatosis and can be used as both cooking oil and as a spread to replace margarines. Krill oil has been shown to prevent fat accumulation in the liver, and has both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions.

Naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packs and coffee enemas may be recommended where appropriate.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Lecithin powder / granules Gut bacteria supplement (broad spectrum)

1-3tbsp daily.

Studies show may help combat fatty liver Improve digestion, prevent gut bacteria endotoxins .

Whole leaf Aloe vera juice

1tbsp daily

Prebiotic, anti-inflammatory

Coenzyme Q10 in ubiquinol form

60-100mg daily

Fatty liver associated with lowered CoQ10

Spirulina

1-3tsp daily

Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant

Broad spectrum plant digestive enzymes

 

To improve digestion

Fat soluble antioxidants such as vitamins A, E and carotenoids

 

Antioxidant

Krill oil

500-1000mg daily

Ant-inflammatory, antioxidant, shown to prevent fat accumulation in liver

Vitamin C

1000mg 1-3 times a day

For liver detoxification enzymes

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

For liver detoxification enzymes

 

Nutrigold Blogs

Krill Oil Prevents Fat Accumulation in the Liver

 

Useful articles

Lecithin and Plant Sterols
 
Benefits of Krill Oil

Alphabet of Antioxidants

Super Spirulina

Digestive Enzymes - The Key to Optimum Health

Vitamin C

CoEnzyme Q10

Wherewithal To Detoxify
 

Useful webinars

Fatty Liver Disease: A 21st Century Health Epidemics

Liver & Gall Bladder Health

Digestive Enzymes: The Key to Optimum Health 

Antioxidants, Carotenoids, Flavonoids and Polyphenols

Update on Aloe CPD Accredited Webinar: 21st Century Uses for a Naturopathic Staple

Understanding Dysbiosiss

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach

What’s so cute about CoQ10

How and Why We Need To Support The Body’s PH Balance

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

 Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Oily scalp

The production of natural hair oils is regulated by the sebaceous glands in the scalp.  Many people have naturally oily hair and skin though the condition can be aggravated by hormonal shifts during puberty, pregnancy and menopause or in hormonal conditions such as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.  A diet high in sugar, processed fats and refined carbohydrates affects the levels of hair oils.  
Supporting detoxification and elimination of hormones via the liver and bowels and ensuring good intake of essential fats may help regulate oil production. Avoid harsh shampoos and conditioners as these strip away natural hair oils and encourage the sebaceous glands to produce more.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

The diet should include plenty of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, oily fish, nuts, seeds, slow cooked meats, hydrated grains, lentils and pulses to ensure a good supply of protein, essential fats, minerals and antioxidants for hair formation and growth. Sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol and excessive consumption of animal fats should be avoided.  Gentle forms of fibre from ground flaxseed and psyllium can aid hormone detoxification and elimination.  Foods rich in phytoestrogens such as chickpeas, flaxseeds, lentils, aduki beans, red clover sprouts and traditional soya foods (tempeh, tofu) support hormone balance.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Comprehensive multi vitamin and mineral formula including Biotin, zinc, B-complex, selenium and vitamin E

As directed

Biotin can improve the metabolism of scalp oils and support hair strength. B-vitamins nourish the nervous system and demand increases in times of stress.

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Hair formation, iron absorption and collagen in blood vessels supplying hair follicles

Zinc citrate

10-15mg per day

Protein synthesis, immune function, vit A metabolism and scalp health

Krill oil

500mg per day

Omega-3 oils reduce inflammation and maintain scalp hydration

Flax oil

1000mg per day

Omega-3, 6 and 9 essential oils regulate scalp hydration and oil production

Sprouted barley grass

As directed

Protein and antioxidant nutrients to aid detoxification and scalp health

Spirulina

5-10g per day

Protein and antioxidant nutrients to aid detoxification and scalp health

Multi-strain probiotic formula

As directed

Nutrient absorption

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful Webinars

Women’s Health by Kirsten Chick

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

OSTEOARTHRITIS

The two most common forms of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is usually a result of age-related wear and tear and results in degeneration of the bone and cartilage in the joints. It can also be caused by poor nutrition, poor absorption of nutrients and injury. Sometimes structural misalignment can put more stress on joints and cause degeneration in the bones and cartilage.

It can be associated with pain, inflammation and reduced mobility, for which doctors generally prescribe painkillers and anti-inflammatory tablets. These can bring relief to sufferers but are not without unpleasant and unwanted side effects in many people.
 

Diet and Lifestyle

The diet should be gently alkalising and hydrating, avoiding foods that may contribute to inflammation such as gluten, dairy products (which are also high in lactic acid), salty foods, acidic fruits (especially citrus fruit), fried foods, tea, coffee, sugar-based drinks and alcoholic spirits. Nightshade family vegetables (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) may also exacerbate inflammation due to their solanine content.Reducing inflammation in the gut will also help with absorption of nutrients.

 

Concentrated alkalising green powders such as spirulina, contain anti-inflammatory compounds, as do kelp seaweed and many herbs and spices, especially turmeric in combination with black pepper. Aloe vera has anti-inflammatory properties, and increasing vegetable intake, for example with vegetable juicing, can be helpful in maintaining a beneficial pH balance.

A well balanced, nutrient-rich diet will help to supply many of the ingredients needed for healthy bone and cartilage production. Additional magnesium, vitamin K, boron and silica may help with calcium placement, bone health and structural alignment.Thyroid / parathyroid support may also be useful here.

Naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packing, enemas and Epsom salt baths may provide beneficial support for an overloaded liver. Epsom salt baths may be useful in easing pain, and provide two fundamental ingredients for detoxification enzymes and for joint health (magnesium and sulphate).
 

Gentle exercise such as swimming or stretching can help to ease aching joints and muscles.

Useful Supplements

Nutritional supplements that possess anti-inflammatory and pain relief properties may be useful for people with arthritis. Daily supplement suggestions include:

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill or fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg fish oil.

Anti-inflammatory; helps with correct calcium/sodium placement; helps with tissue integrity .

Magnesium citrate

200-400mg

Important for correct calcium placement; each cell needs magnesium to make energy for vital processes to happen

Zinc citrate

25-50mg

Anti-inflammatory

Glucosamine hydrochloride

750-1500mg

Glucosamine is needed for healthy cartilage. Hydrochloride form of glucosamine is suitable for vegetarians and vegans and also binds more glucosamine per capsule so fewer capsules have to been taken.

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)

250-460mg

To help alleviate painful symptoms; adrenal support to pre-empt specific thyroid support

Vitamin C

1-3g

Vitamin C is a major part of the substance collagen, a tough fibrous protein which is an integral part of tendons and bones; adrenal support to pre-empt specific thyroid support

Vitamin D

2000-5000 IU daily

Anti-inflammatory

Vitamin E

400–500IU daily

Vitamin E has anti-inflammatory properties, and works well together with vitamin C

Coenzyme Q10

60-100mg in ubiquinol form

Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, needed for energy production

MSM

1000-2000mg

Anti-inflammatory, pain management, aids natural healing processes

Hop alpha acids

As required

Natural anti-inflammatory for fast acting pain relief (within 30-60mins). Also provides high levels of antioxidants to joint healing.

 

 

Useful articles

Painkillers increase the risk strokes

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

 

Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Supergreens

Alpha Acids and Natural Pain Relief

Healthy Joints

Aloe Vera

Benefits of Krill Oil

Super Spirulina

Detoxification

CoEnzyme Q10

Vitamin D

Adrenal Support

 

 

Useful webinars

 

Joint and Connective Tissue

How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach

Managing PainAdrenal Support

Thyroid Health

Liver & Gall Bladder Health

Update on Aloe CPD Accredited Webinar: 21st Century Uses for a Naturopathic Staple

Update on Vitamin D: So Much More Than Bone Health

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

OSTEOPAENIA

Osteopaenia is considered to be the earlier stages of osteoporosis, as the bones have started to weaken and bone density has started to lower. It is important to note, however, that a diagnosis of osteopaenia does not necessarily mean that the person will get osteoporosis. It is meant more as a marker of a possible risk. 
 

Diet and Lifestyle

Bone demineralisation and weakening is a slow process that usually takes many years. It is sometimes due to low levels of calcium in the diet, but much more likely is a situation of calcium misplacement: the body has plenty of calcium but is choosing to remove it from the bones and place it into tissue cells instead. Why would the body choose to do this? Usually to protect the cells from becoming too acidic, so the first logical step in addressing osteopaenia would be to gradually shift to a more alkalising diet. The gentle addition of increasing amounts of green leafy vegetables would be helpful and perhaps even some green powders and juices (e.g. spirulina, barleygrass, wheatgrass). At the same time, sugars, processed foods, table salt and diets heavy in protein and/or carbohydrates should be avoided.

Our bodies may become more acidic as a result of poor diet, pollution, stress and trauma. We can work to change diet relatively easily, but where we have an influence, it may also be important to help the body deal with toxins, and let go of anything holding us back on mental/emotional levels.

As a result of calcium moving into the cells, magnesium is lost. With an alkalising and hydrating diet, magnesium can be one of the key factors in getting calcium out of the cells and back into the bones again. This is because of the dynamic relationship of the electrolytes, which include magnesiumcalciumpotassium and sodium. Magnesium is also an important mineral in bones.

So many naturopaths would argue that magnesium should be the first port of call for strengthening bone density, and calcium supplements avoided unless there is a clear deficiency in diet (rare) or extremely poor absorption in the gut.

Other nutrients that are noted to play a role in nutrition protecting bone density are: Vitamin D, ZincSilica (horsetail), Vitamin EVitamin C, Boron, ManganeseCopper, Vitamin K2Folic Acid, Boron and some form of essential fatty acid, such as Krill oilEPA Marine Fish oils or Flaxseed Oil.

 

Mineral supplements

It’s also important to avoid the use of seemingly cheap mainstream inorganic nutrient forms like calcium carbonate (chalk, and an antacid) and magnesium oxide, (a mild laxative). Neither of these forms are at all well utilised by our body (click to see newsletter 3). In fact in some cases, calcium carbonate reduces stomach acidity (this part should be acidic) thus reducing the body’s ability to break down food and utilise key nutrients like calciummagnesium etc. Thus we would not recommend any product containing either of these forms of magnesium or calcium.

Instead we would recommend magnesium citrate, and where necessary, calcium citrate (in a 2:1 ratio, i.e. twice as much magnesium as calcium).

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-3000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

Anti-inflammatory; fluidity in cellular membrane to assist with electrolyte movement and therefore calcium placement

Vitamin D

1-10,000 IU daily

For calcium utilisation

Magnesium citrate

400-650 mg daily - on its own or with calcium citrate in a 2:1 ratio in favour of magnesium

For calcium absorption and placement

Multi-vitamin/mineral formula aimed at bone support

Ideally containing good levels of well absorbed Magnesium, Calcium, Silica, Zinc, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, Manganese, Boron, Copper, chromium, Vitamin K and Folic acid.

To support bone strength and calcium placement

Spirulina or green powder formula

As indicated

To help alkalise

 

Useful articles

Preventing osteoporosis & strengthening bone density
Simply magnesium
Super spirulina
Super greens, oranges and golden yellows
Calcium and Heart Attacks
Product Cautions
Vitamin D - More than a ray of Sunshine
Vitamin D Crucial Missing Nutrient in Pregnancy
Vitamin D may help asthma and allergies
Vitamin D (Calciferols)
D2 or D3 – which is the best supplement?
Charities U-Turn on Sun Advice
Hip, knee replacements tied to heart attack risk: study

 

Useful webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue
UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR
CPD Accredited Webinar: Magic Magnesium! The Many Health Benefits of this Essential Mineral
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

OSTEOPOROSIS

For information on Rheumatoid Arthritis please click here

Osteoporosis, or “Brittle Bones as it is often referred, is caused by the slow loss of bone mineralisation and is primarily seen as a disease of the elderly, although dietary facts earlier in life are noted to have a great influence. It should be noted that demineralisation takes place over many years, and therefore, can take many years to address.  Orthodox nutrition and main stream nutrition see this as a lack of calcium in the bones and often recommend Calcium Carbonate 1000mg and Vitamin D3 400iu.

Naturopathic views of this issue

Demineralisation often starts much earlier in life than is currently acknowledge and is possibly something we should all be considering much earlier on. Naturopaths believe this issue is mainly down to the overall pH (alkalinity/acidity) of the body, which is believed to affect the placement of key mineral electrolytes, in particular magnesiumcalciumpotassium and sodium

Although orthodox treatment focuses on calcium levels, we would see osteoporosis as a misplacement of calcium not a deficiency, where magnesium is particularly important for the absorption and placement of calcium.

It is worth noting that the average British Diet (a nutritionally poor diet), already delivers 970mg of calcium, compared to an RDA of 800mg. Few people are aware, however, of the important role magnesium plays in this area of health and yet the average British diet only delivers 267mg daily of magnesium compared to an RDA of 375mg.

So in our minds brittle bones are far more likely to be caused by a lack of magnesium, rather than calcium. As the diet delivers above the RDA level of calcium (although you can debate optimum levels) and not optimum levels of magnesium, we often recommend double the amount of magnesium to calcium or even just magnesium.

The common mantra is that we should increase dairy to get our calcium.  Even if more calcium is required, in fact, it is far better to get our calcium from green leafy vegetables - after all, where do the cows get it from? In fact a diet high in meat and dairy products and low in vegetables may contribute to levels of acidity, which may contribute to calcium misplacement and therefore osteoporosis.

 
Other nutrients that are noted to play a role in nutrition protecting bone density are: Vitamin D2 or D3 (interestingly they both work as efficiently as each other when it comes to supporting bone density), ZincSilica (horsetail), Vitamin EVitamin C, Boron, ManganeseCopperVitamin KFolic Acid, Boron and some form of essential fatty acid, Krill oilEPA Marine Fish oils or Flaxseed Oil.

We believe that these issues manifest themselves gradually over years.  Our bodies often slowly become more acidic, exacerbated by diet and lifestyle choices, until a state of cellular dehydration occurs. This in turn affects our ability to detoxify effectively, which can raise the level of the body’s acidity to a point where it leaches calcium from the bone (calcium is alkaline) to reduce the acidity in the body. Key dietary and life style influences are believed to be due to excess levels of sodium in our diet (salt), excessive use of stimulating diuretic drinks (tea, coffee, soft drinks and alcohol), excess stress, lack of sleep and lack of exercise.

It’s also important to avoid the use of seemingly cheap mainstream inorganic nutrient forms like calcium carbonate (chalk, and an antacid) and magnesium oxide, (a mild laxative). Neither of these forms are at all well utilised by our body (click to see newsletter 3). In fact in some cases, calcium carbonate reduces stomach acidity (this part should be acidic) thus reducing the body’s ability to break down food and utilise key nutrients like calciummagnesium etc. Thus we would not recommend any product containing either of these forms of magnesium or calcium.


The ongoing debates about the levels of supplementation recommended:

There are several articles that would suggest that too much calcium could be harmful.  There are several trials that indicate that it is the over-use of inorganic calcium (calcium carbonate) that causes problems for our health, through the calcification of our organs!   We do not have an issue with low levels of organic calcium, if it is supported with at least double the amount of well absorbed organic magnesium.  Ideally both forms would be in the citrate form, which delivers more mineral per citrate unit.  


Other interesting reading

Calcium and Heart Atta cks
Product Cautions
Vitamin D - More than a ray of Sunshine
Vitamin D Crucial Missing N utrient in Pregnancy
Vitamin D may help asthma a nd allergies
Vitamin D (Ca lciferols)
D2 or D3 – which is the best supplement?
Charities U-Turn on S un Advice
Hip, knee replacements tied to heart attack risk: study
 

 

 

Diet and Lifestyle

A gently alkalising diet with plenty of vegetables is therefore advisable, together with some support for the liver and kidneys.As the thyroid and parathyroid glands are also involved in calcium placement and pH balance, it is worth also looking to support the endocrine system in general and those glands in particular. Good endocrine support begins with nurturing and soothing the adrenals, and a hydrating, alkalising diet free from highly processed foods, high sodium levels, gluten and dairy may be helpful here. Sea vegetables are nourishing for both the adrenals and the thyroid.

There is some evidence that smoking increases the risk of osteoporosis as does excessive coffee and alcohol intake. Even gentle physical exercise, such as t’ai chi,  can prevent bone loss if it is load bearing (with weight supported by the legs), so the bones are flexed, encouraging calcium to be deposited. Vegetarians have a lower incidence of osteoporosis, perhaps because the diet is lower in protein, as high protein diets can cause calcium excretion.

 

 

Useful Supplements

Nutritional supplements that may be useful for people with osteoporosis:
 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-3000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

Anti-inflammatory; fluidity in cellular membrane to assist with electrolyte movement and therefore calcium placement

Vitamin D

1-10,000 IU daily

For calcium utilisation

Magnesium citrate

400-650 mg daily - on its own or with calcium citrate in a 2:1 ratio in favour of magnesium

For calcium absorption and placement

Multi-vitamin/mineral formula aimed at bone support

Ideally containing good levels of well absorbed Magnesium, Calcium, Silica, Zinc, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, Manganese, Boron, Copper, chromium, Vitamin K and Folic acid.

To support bone strength and calcium placement

Supergreen powder

As indicated

To help alkalise

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Anti-inflammatory and natural pain relief

 

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education_Newsletter-Preventing-Osteoporsis.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
Calcium and Heart Attacks
Product Cautions
Vitamin D - More than a ray of Sunshine
Vitamin D Crucial Missing Nutrient in Pregnancy
Vitamin D may help asthma and allergies
Vitamin D (Calciferols)
D2 or D3 – which is the best supplement?
Charities U-Turn on Sun Advice
Hip, knee replacements tied to heart attack risk: study

 

 

Useful webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

PAIN

Pain is the body's expression of discomfort and it is one of the symptoms of inflammation and tension.

Inflammation can have a number of causes; tension is often caused by a lack of magnesium, which is required for muscles to relax. Lack of magnesium in the muscles that surround blood vessel walls, for example, may lead to constriction of blood flow to the head, which may result in or contribute to headaches or migraines. Tension in the shoulders and upper back may contribute to lack of blood flow to the arms, wrists and hands, which may contribute to repetitive strain injury (RSI) and similar conditions.

Coenzyme Q10 is also important in this picture, and may be required alongside magnesium. Sometimes it is also useful to increase potassium intake.

The brain produces hormone-like chemicals called "endorphins" (the body's natural pain killers) which block pain signals moving through the nervous system. Researchers have now demonstrated that individual pain tolerance levels are related to the ability to produce these natural pain killers.

Orthodox treatments, such as aspirin and paracetamol can work well but generally, they are not without side effects such as nausea, constipation, diarrhoea and even headaches.

Hop alpha acids have been shown to be as effective as ibuprofen in reducing inflammation and pain. 

 

Diet & Lifestyle

As usual, a hydrating and alkalising diet is recommended.

It may advisable to keep consumption of foods high in sodium and perhaps also those high in arachidonic acid (such as red meat and dairy products) to a minimum: arachidonic acid is converted to inflammatory prostaglandins, although some studies suggest that in the right conditions they may help to reduce inflammation.

It may also be useful to address how the person responds to stress.


Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Fish oils (containing EPA and DHA). This is not the same as cod liver oil

1000–2000 mg

Anti-inflammatory

Magnesium citrate

Approx 400mg

To help reduce tension in the muscles and blood vessel walls

Coenzyme Q10

60-100mg

To help reduce tension in the muscles and blood vessel walls

Hop alpha acids

500-1000mg daily

Natural pain killer

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_may_be_causing_your_headache
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_increase_risk_of_stroke_think_twice_before_popping_a_paink
updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/painkillers_cause_gastric_ulcers1
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/non_steroidal_anti_inflammatory_painkillers_can_cause_infertility
updates.nutrigold.co.uk/.../uk_experiencing_worrying_rise_in_painkiller_ addiction1
 

Useful Webinars

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Useful Supplements

POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME (PCOS)

Experienced by 5-10% of women of childbearing age, PCOS is a condition where the ovaries start to mature too many eggs each month. Many of them become cysts that may then prevent ovulation and therefore affect fertility. In addition, rasied levels of Luteinising Hormone (LH) increase incidence of miscarriage to 65%, compared to 12% in women with normal LH levels.

Symptoms may include irregular or absent periods, excess hair on the face and/or body and acne, as well as increased risk of diabetes and obesity due to insulin resistance.
 

Diet & Lifestyle

As with many menstrual conditions, it is important to address hormonal balance, starting with adrenal support and building from there. Lifestyle changes may be possible which reduce stress levels or help to manage stress better. Stress can usually be reduced from the diet by lowering or avoiding sugar, caffeine, alcohol, damaged fats, gluten and dairy, as well as providing a hydrating, alkalising and nourishing diet.

Long chain essential fatty acids, such as EPA in krill and fish oil and DGLA in evening primrose oil, are needed to make prostaglandins, which help to regulate the reproductive system. Magnesium, zinc and vitamins B3, B6, c and E are important co-factors here.

Iodine-rich kelp nurtures both the adrenals and the thyroid, and additional iodine may be indicated here both to assist with the activity of insulin receptors and to help balance oestrogens. The liver and bowel flora also play a role here, so avoid overloading the liver with rich foods, and try including some probiotic foods such as sauerkraut and miso. Also consider naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packing and coffee enemas where appropriate.


Useful Supplements 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil

500-1000mg daily

For prostaglandin production and general tissue health

Evening primrose oil

500mg

For prostaglandin production and general tissue health

Good quality multivitamin and mineral containing magnesium citrate, zinc, B3, B6, C and E

As indicated

For prostaglandin production

Additional magnesium citrate

Up to a total of 400-600mg daily

For tissue health

Additional zinc citrate

Up to a total of 30-60mg daily

For tissue and general reproductive health

Probiotic

1-2 daily

For bowel flora balance

Supergreen powder

As indicated

To help alkalise

Iodine

Seek professional advice

Hormonal support


Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Preconceptual-Care-Natural-Fertility.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/NG-Education-Newsletter-Fish-Oils.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Fatty_Acids.pdf


Useful Webinars

Fertility Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Pre-conceptual Care webinar by Kirsten Chick
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

                                                 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME

Premenstrual syndrome affects approximately 75% of  menstruating women and the often ill-defined symptoms can be severely debilitating. It is widespread in the western world but uncommon in less developed societies, suggesting a role for diet and lifestyle.  PMS symptoms can begin at any time from ovulation (half way through the menstrual cycle) and last throughout the luteal phase until menstruation begins.  Some women only feel relief from their symptoms after the heaviest day of their period.

Over 100 different PMS symptoms have been identified.  The commonest emotional effects include mood swings, anger, aggression, depression, weepiness, anxiety and irritability.  Physical symptoms include lethargy, sleep disturbances, bloating, breast tenderness, and changes in bowel function, skin breakouts, weight gain, cravings and clumsiness.

The severity of PMS symptoms can range from being mild to moderate through to severely disruptive, with 5-8% of sufferers experiencing Pre Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder, an extreme form of PMS.

Conventional approaches to PMS management include oral contraceptives or contraceptive injections, implants or coils to influence hormonal rhythms and SSRI anti-depressants.  The naturopathic nutritional approach focuses on blood sugar balance, detoxification and elimination in order to support hormone balance, energy levels and emotional stability.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes can produce excellent results. A high fibre diet containing plenty of vegetables and fruit should be eaten, and intake of refined carbohydrates (sweet foods and white flour) should be restricted. Dark green vegetables provide valuable magnesium and B-vitamins alongside sulphur compounds to support liver detoxification functions.  Beans and pulses supply fibre and phytoestrogens; these are plant compounds with beneficial modulating effects on oestrogen receptors, aiding hormone balance. Oily fish, nuts and seeds are rich in essential fatty acids to support prostaglandin formation and reduce inflammation.  Caffeinated drinks and alcohol are better replaced with water and herb teas to maintain good hydration.

A well-planned exercise programme can also be of benefit for supporting mood balance, reducing tension and maintaining bowel regularity.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing zinc 15 mg, vitamin C, vitamin B complex 50–100 mg

Hormone balance, mood balance and energy production. Needed for the conversion of essential fatty acids.

Evening primrose oil
OR
Starflower (borage) oil

Up to 3 g daily

1 g daily

GLA in Evening Primrose and Starflower oil is converted to DGLA which has anti-inflammatory effects

Krill Oil

500-1000mg per day

Krill provides EPA and DHA for mood balance and anti-inflammatory prostaglandins

Hop Alpha Acids

500mg-1000mg per day Reduce pain and inflammation

Magnesium citrate

200-400mg per day Support hormone and blood sugar balance, reduce cramps

Multi strain probiotic

As directed Probiotic bacteria support liver detoxification and bowel function

Lecithin powder

3-12g per day Phospholipids’ in lecithin support liver function

Chromium Picolinate

100mcg per day Support blood sugar balance and reduce cravings

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Biomedical-Mixed-Oils.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/omega_oils_your_mini_guide_to_omegas_3_6_and_9

 

Useful webinars

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/pre_empting_premenstrual_syndrome_cpd_webinar_by_dr_philipps

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/mental_health_part_2_depression_anxiety_cpd_accredited_webinar

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/womens_health_webinar_by_kirsten_chick1 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/cpd_accredited_webinar_magic_magnesium_the_many_health_benefits_of_this_ess 

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here



Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

PROSTATE ENLARGEMENT

Prostate problems are common in men over fifty years of age; the most common condition is benign prostate hyperplasia. The prostate gland enlarges, constricting the urethra, making urination difficult. Surgery may be recommended to correct the problem but nutrition may also be useful.

In some cases, prostate enlargement may also be a symptom in prostate cancer, which may be suggested by blood tests looking at PSA counts.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

Alcohol, smoking and caffeine should be avoided as these add to the burden of detoxification on the body. The diet should be low in saturated fat (red meat, full-fat dairy foods, pastry, cakes, biscuits and hard fats), damaged fats and sugar, and high in vegetables, with an appropriate supply of essential fatty acids (oily fish, seeds and nuts) and zinc. Potassium is often useful too, alongside magnesium – these minerals help detoxification, as well as blood (and therefore lymph) flow.

Lycopene is also often mentioned for prostate health, with highest levels being found in cooked and processed tomatoes. Pink grapefruit, asparagus, chicken, red cabbage, parsley and carrots are also good sources.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Zinc

15 mg

This is a vital mineral for prostate health

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-3000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein) – perhaps together with 500-1000mg evening primrose oil

Anti-inflammatory; prostaglandin support

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg

Detoxification; blood flow

Potassium citrate

1–200mg daily

Detoxification; blood flow

Saw palmetto, extract

150 mg twice daily

This herb contains a substance that inhibits the hormone metabolite that causes prostate enlargement.

Antioxidants (Vitamin C, E, natural beta carotene and selenium)

 

Prevent potential damage by free radicals produced during inflammation

Amino acids (glycine, alanine, glutamic acid)

 

Help to improve urine flow

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Detoxification.pdf


 Useful Webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

PSORIASIS

Psoriasis is a common, recurring skin disorder. The skin erupts into red circular patches, covered with dry scales. It is associated with a number of factors including poor fat digestion, liver dysfunction (often from alcohol consumption), bowel problems and stress.

Occasionally symptoms affect the joints as well as or instead of the skin, a condition known as psoriatic arthritis.

 

Diet and lifestyle

The first step might be to soothe the G.I. tract with hydrating fluids, soups and broths. Omega 3 oils, perhaps from krill or marine fish oil, zinc, vitamin A and selenium are all important for the health of the mucous membranes. A good probiotic alongside a diet including some fermented foods (such as sauerkraut, tempeh, kefir etc.) may also help restore balance to the bowel flora.

Vegetables of the nightshade family – including potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers and aubergines – may exacerbate the inflammation associated with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. It may also be useful to avoid other foods that may contribute to inflammation on the gut, such as gluten-rich grains, diary, sugar and caffeine.

A detoxification programme supported with the appropriate naturopathic techniques to support the main organs of elimination – the liver, bowel skin and kidneys – may also be helpful. Such techniques may include gentle enemas, castor oil packs and dry skin brushing to unaffected areas. Baths with sodium bicarbonate may help to soothe irritation, as may aloe vera applied topically.

Sunlight has also been found to be beneficial for many people.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

EPA and DHA have anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy properties, and are important for the health of the skin and the intestinal wall.

Evening primrose oil OR Starflower (borage) oil

500-1000mg daily

1 g daily

Oils rich in gamma-linoleic acid which possess anti-inflammatory properties and may be effective at reducing itching and inflammation. It’s important to balance this with good levels of omega 3 PUFAs (such as fish or krill oil supplements)

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily

Anti-inflammatory and beneficial for the health of the skin and intestinal wall. Zinc is known to be involved in the conversion of fatty acids to anti-inflammatory prostaglandins (hormone-like chemicals)

Magnesium citrate

200-600mg daily

To help hydrate skin, manufacture detoxification enzymes, adrenal support and counter effects of anxiety

Silicon

10mg

For skin health and structure

Broad spectrum gut bacteria supplement

As indicated

To improve bowel flora balance and help resolve inflammation in the bowel and therefore in the skin

Vitamins A, C, E and selenium

As part of an anti-oxidant formula

For general mucous membrane and connective tissue health

Aloe vera

Topically plus 1-2tbsp orally

Anti-inflammatory; cooling

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Anti-inflammatory

Spirulina or green powder formula

As indicated

Alkalising; anti-inflammatory

Vitamin D3

1000-5000iu

Anti-inflammatory

 

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/skin_news.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter%E2%80%93Colon.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/nutrigold_newsletter_adrenal_support.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Spirulina_LoRes_For_web.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/eczema_cases_reported_in_the_uk_is_rising_by_42_per_year

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/childhood_allergies_protected_by_omega_3_essential_fatty_acids

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/a_to_z_illness/leaky_gut_syndrome

 

 

Useful webinars

Eczema Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Managing Allergies the Naturopathic Way Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

For information on osteoporosis, please click here

The two most common forms of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by inflammation in the joints that can cause pain and swelling.Calcium is dumped into the joints - usually due to an overloaded liver, over-acidity and thyroid/parathyroid depletion – accompanied by high levels of sodium. The tissue in that area can no longer remain hydrated and flexible, and instead can become chronically and painfully irritated and inflamed.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

The diet should be gently alkalising and hydrating, avoiding foods that may contribute to inflammation such as gluten, dairy products (which are also high in lactic acid), salty foods, acidic fruits (especially citrus fruit), fried foods, tea, coffee, sugar-based drinks and alcoholic spirits. Nightshade family vegetables (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) may also exacerbate inflammation due to their solanin content.

“Supergreens” such as spirulina and wheatgrass, contain anti-inflammatory compounds, as do kelp seaweed and many herbs and spices, especially turmeric in combination with black pepper. Aloe vera has anti-inflammatory properties, and increasing vegetable intake, for example with vegetable juicing, can be helpful in maintaining a beneficial pH balance.

Naturopathic techniques such as castor oil packing, enemas and Epsom salt baths may provide beneficial support for an overloaded liver. Epsom salt baths may be useful in easing pain, and provide 2 fundamental ingredients for detoxification enzymes and for joint health (magnesium and sulphate).

Gentle exercise such as swimming or stretching can help to ease aching joints and muscles.

 

Useful Supplements

Nutritional supplements that possess anti-inflammatory and pain relief properties may be useful for people with arthritis.

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill or fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg fish oil

Anti-inflammatory; helps with correct calcium/sodium placement; helps with tissue integrity

Magnesium citrate

200-600mg

Important for correct calcium placement; each cell needs magnesium to make energy for vital processes to happen

Hop alpha acids

 

Pain management

Zinc citrate

50mg

Anti-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory

Glucosamine sulphate

1500mg

Glucosamine needed for healthy cartilage; sulphate needed to keep cartilage well hydrated and to help the body detoxify (Epsom salt baths can also be useful for this reason)

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)

250 mg, two to four times daily

To help alleviate painful symptoms; adrenal support to pre-empt specific thyroid support

Vitamin C

l–3 g daily

Vitamin C is a major part of the substance collagen, a tough fibrous protein which is an integral part of tendons and bones; adrenal support to pre-empt specific thyroid support

Vitamin E

400–500 IU daily

Vitamin E has anti-inflammatory properties, and works well together with vitamin C

Green lipped mussel extract

 

This has anti-inflammatory properties and many sufferers find it compares favourably with results obtained from conventional drugs. It also has a gastro-protective effect against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

Coenzyme Q10

60-200mg daily in ubiquinol form

Anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, needed for energy production

MSM

1000-6000mg daily

Anti-inflammatory, pain management, aids natural healing processes

 

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-healthy-joints.pdf

http://www.nutrigold.co.uk/courses/rheumatoid_arthritis_webinar.html

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/the_truth_behind_the_need_to_detoxify

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-VitaminD.pdf 

 

Useful webinars

Rheumatoid Arthritis Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines 

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675

ROSACEA

Rosacea or acne rosacea as it is sometimes known appears primarily as a blush or redness on the nose, cheeks and chin.  Small spots and cysts may develop and tiny blood vessels can become prominent and visible.  In severe cases skin can thicken, especially on the nose, forming bulbous lumps.  Rosacea can affect the eyes (ocular rosacea) causing itchy, stingy dry eyes and a sensitivity to light.  The condition affects around 10% of people in the UK including children and young adults but is most common in middle-aged adults.

The exact cause of rosacea remains unclear though stress is known to worsen the condition.  Genetic susceptibility, abnormal function of immune cells in the skin causing inflammation, damaged blood vessels; sun damage and infection from a tiny skin mite (demodex folliculorum) are all possible causes.

Low levels of stomach acid and digestive enzymes are linked with the condition because of subsequent poor protein digestion and absorption of key nutrients.  Poor protein digestion leads to putrefaction in the gut by ‘unfriendly’ gut bacteria, a process which produces toxic metabolites.  Protein digesting enzymes (proteases) are also important for reducing inflammation via their breakdown of fibrin, a compound which encases damaged tissue and contributes to swelling and inflammation.
 

Diet and Lifestyle

Foods which dilate the capillaries should be avoided (coffee, tea, chocolate, alcohol and spices).  Include a plentiful supply of oily fish, cold pressed seed oils, nuts and seeds to provide anti-inflammatory omega oils, brightly coloured fruits and vegetables for their antioxidant contents and pre-soaked gluten free grains for B-vitamins and minerals.  Gluten (found in wheat, barley, rye and at low levels in oats) is best avoided as it can compromise intestinal integrity and contribute towards inflammation. 
 
Green leafy vegetables supply B-vitamins and magnesium which support adrenal function and are alkalising to the system, helping reduce inflammation.  Pumpkin seeds, nuts, poultry, lamb and fish are excellent sources of zinc, a nutrient crucial for skin healing and immune function.  Replace caffeinated drinks and alcohol with 1.5l of filtered water and herb teas each day.
 
Relaxation techniques and stress management practises  are beneficial to support the ability of the body to handle stress.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Betaine hydrochloride

300–500 mg one to three times daily

Corrects low gastric acidity

Plant based digestive ancreatic enzymes

Taken with each meal

These enzymes replace any digestive insufficiency and work effectively throughout the varying pH levels of the intestinal tract

Whole leaf Aloe vera juice

10-50ml per day internally, also use dilute topically on sore skin

Aloe vera has cooling, soothing, anti-inflammatory and healing properties for the skin

Comprehensive multivitamin & mineral formula including full vitamin B complex

As directed

B vitamins are needed to manufacture digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid. Riboflavin (B2) has been found to be particularly beneficial for skin. In times of stress, the body has a greater requirement for B vitamins

Zinc citrate

15 mg daily

To aid healing, enhance digestive enzyme production and support the immune system

Vitamin C

1000mg per day

Supports skin healing and adrenal function when under stress

Krill oil or cold pressed flaxseed oil

Krill: 500-1000mg per day Flaxseed oil: 2-3 dessertspoons per day

To supply anti-inflammatory omega-3 oils and support the moisture retaining capacity of skin cells.

Grapeseed extract

25-50mg per day

Powerful antioxidant and aids skin healing

High strength multi strain probiotic formula

As directed

To support intestinal flora if antibiotics are used to treat the rosacea

 

Useful articles

Newsletter - Supergreens

Newsletter – Aloe Vera

Newsletter – Health Benefits of Krill Oil

Newsletter – Vitamin C

Newsletter – Benefits of Digestive Enzymes

Update article – Renew Your Natural Beauty from Within

 

Useful webinars

Understanding the highs and lows of stomach acid

Update on Aloe: 21st Century uses for this naturopathic staple

Antioxidants, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols

Addressing Acne – A Naturopathic Approach to Skin Health

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution

Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:
When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.
Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.
This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER (SAD)


Seasonal Affective Disorder is usually categorised by depression in the winter months, or during phases at other times of year when there is a lack of sun. Brain function and the hormonal system in general both seem to struggle when the full spectrum of light is not available, and an obvious factor here would be vitamin D deficiency.

We can only make vitamin D from UVB rays that only reach us when the sun is at least 50 degrees above the horizon (see http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/how-do-i-get-the-vitamin-d-my-body-needs/) . Between mid-September and mid-late April, the sun is never high enough in the sky in the UK and similar parts of the northern hemisphere (and the corresponding regions of the southern hemisphere); during the summer months the sun may only be high enough for a short time either side of noon, and even then the important UVB rays may be blocked by cloud cover, pollution, precipitation, clothing, glass and sun creams. It is interesting that SAD is much rarer in countries closer to the equator, where vitamin D production from the sun is much more consistent.

Alongside this, it may also be important to give targeted nutritional support to the brain and hormonal system. Essential fatty acids are needed for both, in particular DHA and EPA from sources such as fish, or supplemented in the form of fish or krill oil, together with a little GLA from evening primrose oil. Magnesium, zinc, a gentle spectrum of B vitamins, choline and inositol, plus good levels of vitamin C would all be key to highlight. Vitamins B5, B6 and C are particularly useful for adrenal support, which should be the first step in any endocrine focussed programme.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

It is therefore important to eat a varied and well-balanced diet, with plenty of vegetables, nuts and seeds, and fish where possible avoiding fish such as tuna likely to be high in mercury and other heavy metals. Lecithin and raw eggs are good sources of choline.

A healthy gut underpins a healthy brain, so avoid gluten, dairy and stimulants such as tea, coffee and sugar; add a small amount of fermented foods daily such as raw sauerkraut, or take a good quality broad spectrum gut bacteria supplement, and make sure your diet is gently hydrating and alkalising.

An important aspect of adrenal support is to consciously evoke feelings of calm, groundedness and centredness. In addition, regular exercise can promote feelings of well-being.

As one of the main issues is a lack of light, it can be helpful to spend as much time outdoors as possible, wrapping up warm to go for walks, for example.

This still doesn’t address the issue of the reduced spectrum of light in the cooler months. SAD lamps and/or vitamin D supplementation are therefore usually essential, alongside general support for the brain and hormonal system.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin D3

2000-10,000IU daily

To compensate for lack of full spectrum of light

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-4000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

To help improve brain function, support the adrenals and help reduce depression and anxiety

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

Helps to produce serotonin and reduce anxiety.

Zinc citrate

30-60mg daily

Helps to reduce inflammation (e.g. at brain level), and required for key brain enzymes and detoxification enzymes

Vitamin B complex

50 mg

B vitamins are required for healthy nerves and a healthy nervous system

Phosphatidyl serine

1-3tsp lecithin granules daily

To help improve brain function

Vitamin C

1 g three times daily

Vitamin C levels are easily depleted during periods of stress

Broad spectrum gut bacteria

As indicated

To support healthy gut

Evening primrose oil

500mg daily

To provide GLA

 

Useful Articles 

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

Adrenal support

Fish oil – essential for hearts, brains and life itself

Phosphatidyl serine

Lecithin and plant sterols

Omega 3 research demonstrates it can help combat depression

Simply magnesium

Zinc

Sweetened drinks linked to depression

Omega 3 deficiency leads to anxiety, hyperactivity, poor memory and learning problems
 

Useful webinars

Naturopathically Managing Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

CPD Webinar - How To Beat The Winter Blues

Mental health Part 2: depression and anxiety

Update on vitamin D: so much more than just bone health CPD accredited webinar

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Webinar by Barbara Wren - Understanding the importance of preserving the correct blood brain barrier

Magic Magnesium

Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

SHINGLES

Shingles is an infection of the nerve endings in the skin caused by a virus (herpes zoster). The condition is characterised by blisters on the skin and severe pain along the nerve involved. Shingles can reoccur during periods of stress, anxiety or as a result of emotional upset.

Diet & Lifestyle

A healthy diet with plenty of fibre and fresh fruit and vegetables is recommended. Relaxation and stress management techniques may be useful.  Compounds in aloe vera have shown to break down the shingles virus.

Epsom salt baths and compreses may help relieve the pain of shingles, as may aloe vera applied topically.

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Aloe vera

As indicated

Orally and topically to combat virus and soothe inflammation

Vitamin B complex, high potency

Containing thiamine and B12

May be beneficial for shingles

Vitamin E

200 IU daily

Vitamin E is essential for healthy nerve functioning and healing

L-lysine

500 mg daily

This inhibits the growth of viruses

Vitamin C

1–3 g daily

Promotes skin healing, enhances immune function and has extensive anti-viral activity

Vitamin A

7500 IU daily

To help limit the infection and promote skin healing

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Pain relief

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-VitaminC.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf

 

Useful Webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

SKIN PROBLEMS


The skin should be considered as any other organ, and is susceptible to a variety of problems.


Diet & Lifestyle

The skin is the biggest organ in the body, and is affected greatly by lifestyle and nutrition. Whilst topical creams and potions attempt to correct damage at the skin's surface, nutrients work from the inside out. Adequate sleep and water intake is necessary for healthy skin, as is careful choice of products applied to the skin (e.g. creams, soaps, washing powder).

The skin is made of connective tissue, which requires vitamin C, zinc, silica, sulphates, amino acid structures and essential fatty acids among other nutrients for good health and structure.

The aspect of connective tissue that helps to keep it hydrated is also a magnet for acidity, which makes it an ideal dumping ground for toxicity from the lymph and blood. If there are enough energy and resources, the skin may act successfully as an organ of elimination; or it may become inflamed and irritated, as a result, at the same time losing its ability to stay hydrated and elastic.

Skin problems may therefore be due to the lymphatic system being overloaded with toxicity, for example, which may in itself result from the liver, bowel, lungs and kidneys being overloaded. A whole detoxification programme with careful naturopathic support for the main routes of elimination may therefore be useful. These may include Epsom salt baths, enemas, castor oil packs etc. depending on what is appropriate for the individual.

Baths with Epsom salts and/or bicarbonate of soda may be soothing; aloe vera topically may help reduce inflammation and itchiness.

Useful Supplements

 

Skin problem

Useful supplements

Wrinkles

Free radicals (especially smoking) are a major cause of wrinkles.  Vitamin C (2 g), vitamin E (200 IU), beta carotene (15mg) and selenium (100 mg), plus anthocyanidins (bilberry, grapeseed extract) daily. 

Acne

See separate listing

Dry skin

Evening primrose oil (1–2 g), zinc (15 mg), vitamin D3 (1000iu), vitamin B complex (50 mg), vitamin A (7500 IU) daily.

Oily skin

Vitamin B complex (50 mg) daily, and avoid dairy products

Itchy skin

Sometimes caused by iron deficiencies; iron (24 mg) daily

Stretch marks

Vitamin E (400 IU), vitamin B complex (50 mg), zinc (l5 mg) daily

Ulcers

Vitamin C (1–2 g), vitamin E (400 IU), multi-vitamin/mineral supplement daily

Psoriasis

See separate listing

Sunburn

See separate listing

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/skin_news.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf  


Useful Webinars
Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Soothing Psoriasis - CPD Webinar By Kirsten Chick
Eczema Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Nutrigold’s CPD Accredited Webinar - Addressing Acne: A Naturopathic Approach to Skin Health
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick
Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

SKIN – ANTI-AGING

To achieve a firm, smooth, healthy complexion, we need nutrients that help build and maintain healthy skin tissue and protect it from damage. Of course, beauty isn’t just skin deep, and we shouldn’t feel pressured to look flawless and youthful all of the time. Audrey Hepburn famously refused to have her lines airbrushed out of Johnny Isaac’s 1992 photo of her, as she had earned every one of them. Sun damage, pollution, and poor diet or nutritional deficiency can age and wrinkle the skin prematurely, however, and we may wish to look after our skin as we would the rest of our body - so we can feel good about how we look, and look as good as we feel.

Wrinkles and fine lines are usually the result of collagen breaking down. 95% of the dermis, or underlying layer of skin, is made of collagen. Collagen fibres and elastin fibres are vital components of our skin, and work together to help to keep it firm, resilient and able to spring back into shape every time we move. Elastin gives it its elasticity, as we can guess from the name, and collagen holds everything in place (the French word “coller” means to stick – and collagen is often referred to as the glue that keeps everything connected).

As we get older, we tend to produce fewer of these proteins, and so the skin loses its integrity. This is when lines, wrinkles and sagging may start to happen, as the skin is unable to maintain the firmness and elasticity of its structure. In addition, skin can be damaged by cigarette smoke, pollution, over exposure to the sun and dietary factors.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Whilst topical creams and potions attempt to correct damage at the skin's surface, nutrients work from the inside out. Adequate sleep and water intake is necessary for healthy skin, as is careful choice of products applied to the skin (e.g. creams, soaps, washing powder).

The skin is made of connective tissue, which requires vitamin C, zinc, silicon, sulphates, amino acid structures and essential fatty acids among other nutrients for good health and structure.

The aspect of connective tissue that helps to keep it hydrated is also a magnet for acidity, which makes it an ideal dumping ground for toxicity from the lymph and blood. If there are enough energy and resources, the skin may act successfully as an organ of elimination; or it may become inflamed and irritated, as a result, at the same time losing its ability to stay hydrated and elastic.

In addition, substances called AGEs (advanced glycation end products) can build up in the skin. These can be found ready-made in fried, baked and processed foods, and we also make them internally, particularly from diets high in fructose and other sugars. High fructose corn syrup is used to flavour many sweet and savoury processed foods, including breakfast cereals, cereal bars, supermarket breads and crackers, ketchup and other sauces. Fruit juices have condensed levels of fructose. We make many more AGEs from fructose than from glucose, andat a faster rate. The fructose (or glucose) attaches to proteins, lipids or nucleic acids without the aid of enzymes, i.e. in an uncontrolled and random way.

When sugar attaches to collagen and other skin proteins in this way, the skin becomes less flexible, elastic and resilient. Glycated collagen is also difficult to break down and replace with new, fresh collagen.

The detox enzyme glutathione is involved in a process that helps clear AGEs, however, and a number of antioxidants, B vitamins and flavonoids (including those in green tea and blueberries) have been found to help prevent AGEs from being formed.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin C


500-1000mg daily

Collagen production and health; glutathione production to help keep skin clear of toxins and be helpful in reducing AGEs

Vitamin E


100mg daily

Collagen production and health; shown to be helpful in reducing AGEs

Zinc

7.5-15mg Collagen production and health; shown to be helpful in reducing AGEs

Copper

500mcg Collagen production and health

Iron

2mg Collagen production and health

Silicon

5mg Collagen production and health

Astaxanthin

2mg Antioxidant shown to be helpful

Zeaxanthin

1000mcg Antioxidant shown to be helpful

Lutein

4mg Antioxidant shown to be helpful

Grapeseed extract

50mg Antioxidant shown to be helpful

Resveratrol

20mg Antioxidant shown to be helpful

Marine collagen (collagen peptides)

100mg Helps trigger healthy collagen production

N-acetyl glucosamine

50mg For healthy skin and connective tissue

Quercetin

  Antioxidant shown to be helpful in reducing AGEs

Low dose B complex containing B2, B3, B6

  Shown to be helpful in reducing AGEs

Evening primrose oil

500mg together with 500mg krill oil or 1000-2000mg fish oil to help keep omega 3 and 6 EFAs in balance Healthy skin

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/skin_news.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Sprains

Sprains are joint injuries where the ligament has been twisted, stretched or torn, whether as a result of sports injury, accident or just walking or running on uneven ground.

Ligaments connect bones to each other at joint sites, and can be damaged through collision, over-reaching, or landing, falling or moving awkwardly. The healing response begins with inflammation, which creates more movement of resources to the area, which ideally then calms down as the area heals. As ligaments have limited blood flow, this process can take longer. Your body therefore requires a great deal of nutrients and energy to successfully heal. 

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Ligament healing support needs to provide the nutrients and energy for the processes of inflammation and blood clotting, as well as for resolving inflammation. The entire process involves a complex interaction of compounds, enzymes and hormones that need a range of nutrients, including omega 3 and 6 oils, saturated fats (for steroid hormones), proteins, minerals (including magnesium, zinc, manganese) and vitamins (including vitamin C and E).

Glucosamine supplementation has long been associated with joint health, and provides an ingredient crucial for making flexible and healthy new connective tissue, the type of tissue that ligaments are made from. In one randomised, double-blind placebo study of 106 male athletes with acute knee injury, those taking glucosamine had a significant improvement in passive knee flexibility (flexion and extension) compared to the placebo group.

MSM has also had a long association with joint health, and years of use in veterinary medicine has supported its reputation for very low toxicity as well as successful application. A small scale study showed a 40% reduction in trips to the chiropractor to resolve acute sports injuries in patients taking MSM supplements.

Chlorophyll, which provides the vibrant green colour in wheatgrass and other leafy greens, has also been noted for wound healing. In addition, vitamin K and calcium are important for blood clotting.

Vitamin C, fish oil and krill oil are all blood thinners, so while they are crucial for wound healing, supplemental forms of these should be avoided a few days before any operations.

After an injury or trauma, new connective tissue will need to be formed, which requires good levels of vitamin C, zinc, iron, copper, silicon and essential fatty acids, among other nutrients.

A well balanced diet with plenty of green leafy vegetables and salads and some oily fish (such as sardines, mackerel, salmon and trout) and seeds (such as pumpkin and sesame seeds) will provide much of this. Take care to avoid sugar, and foods that may lower your nutrient intake, such as white flour, highly processed foods, gluten, dairy, damaged fats, caffeine and alcohol.

So that nutrients and healing compounds can flow freely to the area and debris can be carried away, the blood, lymph, interstitial fluids and connective tissue need to be hydrated and circulation needs to be good. Good levels of fluids and electrolytes, especially magnesium and potassium, are therefore essential. It is also important to keep the connective tissue alkalised, as conditions of acidity will create dehydration, and also make it more difficult to make the enzymes, hormones and other compounds necessary for wound healing.

Aloe vera can be useful both topically and orally to help reduce inflammation and support the healing of burns, cuts, bites, sprains and other injuries.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Glucosamine

750-1500mg daily

To help build healthy connective tissue

MSM

375 – 1000mg daily

Anti-inflammatory; assists blood flow to area; reduces muscle spasm

Vitamin C with bioflavenoids

Build up to 3000mg daily, 1 with each meal (not all at once)

Anti-inflammatory; needed for wound healing, making new connective tissue

Zinc citrate

Build up to 50-60mg daily; take away from other foods and supplements, apart from B6 (20mg daily) Anti-inflammatory; needed for wound healing, making new connective tissue

Good quality multimineral and vitamin, avoiding minerals in carbonate or oxide form

As indicated

Krill or marine fish oils (containing EPA and DHA). (This is not the same as cod liver oil.)

500-1000mg krill oil daily or 3-4g fish oil (take with protein) Anti-inflammatory

Magnesium citrate

Build up to 400-600mg daily Electrolyte important for hydration

Aloe vera

Topically and orally as indicated Anti-inflammatory; assists healing process

Supergreen powder

As indicated Alkalising; chlorophyll for wound healing

Hop alpha acids

As indicated Pain relief; anti-inflammatory

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grapeseed, bilberry extract)

 

Inhibits inflammatory chemicals


Useful articles


http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-healthy-joints.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Biomedical-Joint-Connective-Tissue.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/could_pre_sprouted_barley_put_the_bounce_back_into_your_life
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/chlorophyll_the_alkalising_molecule_of_life
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Aloe-Magazine-Ten.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Aloe-Magazine-Two.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Fatty_Acids.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue
Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Stomach Ulcers

Stomach ulcers are open sores on the inside of the stomach lining. Most have an association with bacterial infection (Helicobacter pylori) and are usually treated in orthodox medicine with antibiotics.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

When a political prisoner in highly stressful conditions, Dr. Batmanjhelid found himself treating many fellow prisoners for stomach ulcers. His only medicine was water, and it worked so well that he asked to stay in longer to finish off his research.

Several studies have also looked at gingerol, a compound in ginger root, to combat helicobacter pylori. An alkalising diet together with small amounts of foods rich in beneficial bacteria (such as sauerkraut, tempeh, miso, kefir etc.) may help rebalance bacterial balance.

Phosphatidyl choline has been shown to help repair the stomach’s mucosal wall.Aloe vera has also been shown to promote gastric healing.

Stress, smoking, alcohol, aspirin and coffee should be limited. A high fibre diet fed to recently-healed patients reduced ulcer recurrence by half.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Probiotic

As indicated

To help repopulate the digestive tract with friendly bacteria

Phospatidyl choline (e.g. lecithin powder / granules)

As indicated

To repair damaged mucosal lining of stomach

Aloe vera

1 tbsp twice daily

To help reduce inflammation; has been shown to promote gastric ulcer healing

Fish or krill oil

500mg krill oil or 1-2000mg marine fish oil

Anti-inflammatory

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing vitamins A, C, E and zinc

To aid healing

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Pain relief

 

Useful Articles 

Lecithin and plant sterols
Phosphatidyl choline
Fighting Fit with Gut Flora
Painkillers cause gastric ulcers
The Importance of Fibre-Rich Diets in Supporting Beneficial Gut Bacteria Growth
Aloe vera – great for the whole digestive system
Vitamin C – our shield from misfortune
Alpha acids and natural pain relief
http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
Indigestion Support: Understanding the Highs and Lows of Stomach Acid by Dr Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

Stress

Our bodies have specific responses to stress, be it mental, emotional or physical. Emotional stress may be caused by unresolved issues with colleagues and loved ones, for example; mental and physical stress may result from “burning the candles at both ends”. Our very social structure may be conducive to stress on all levels: compare a) working full time or even shift work 11-12 months of the year to feed an isolated family unit and pay rent or mortgage and bills, with b) a life lived close to nature and working with the seasonal and lunar cycles as part of an extended family and mutually supporting community!

In response to stress, the adrenal glands release hormones that prime the body for action by raising blood pressure and heart rate, and sending energy to, for example, the muscles in the arms and legs. Energy and resources are drawn away from less immediate concerns, such as digestion, reproduction and long term healing and repair strategies.

At cellular level, cells become more sodium dominant and acidic, flow of fluids (and therefore nutrients, hormones and waste) in and out becomes more sluggish, and the ability to produce the energy for cellular activity drops along with the ability to resolve inflammation.

Since modern stress factors are often unresolved or long term issues, rather than occasional "fight or flight" moments, this may create a chronic situation of ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, asthma, heart disease, fatigue, depression, insomnia and more.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Powerful emotions (such as hate and anxiety) ruin the appetite. The digestive system is particularly sensitive to stress, and contains as many nerve endings as the spine and the same mood-affecting neurotransmitters as the brain. It is therefore wise to keep the digestive tract hydrated, soothed and healthy.

Soups, stews and simple meals can be really helpful. Bone broths in particular are often soothing and healing to the gut, as well as rich in electrolytes that help to keep fluids flowing at cellular level. Small amounts of fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, tempeh and kefir, may help to replenish an inflamed gut with beneficial bacteria.

It’s often useful to use grains in moderation, well soaked, fermented where possible, and slow cooked for a long time in plenty of water. Gluten-rich grains, especially wheat, may contribute to inflammation in the gut, as may dairy, sugar, caffeine, damaged fats, heavily processed foods and a diet lacking in sufficient vegetables. Stimulants such as sugar, caffeine, chocolate (even raw chocolate) may put too great a demand on depleted adrenals.

The adrenals, which release stress hormones, are nourished by good hydration, essential fatty acids, magnesium, zinc, certain B vitamins (such as B5 and B6), vitamin C and more.
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To provide cellular energy and improve electrolyte exchange and therefore flow of fluids in and out of cell; has been shown to reduce anxiety

Vitamin B5 (calcium pantothenate)

540-1080mg daily

Adrenal support

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate)

20-40mg daily

Adrenal support

Vitamin C

1g–3 g daily (e.g. 1000mg with each meal)

To replace vitamin C depleted by the adrenals

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg krill oil or 2000-3000mg marine fish oil (always take with protein)

To improve flow of fluids in and out of cell; to replace essential fatty acids depleted by the adrenals; anti-inflammatory

Multi strain gut bacteria formula

As indicated

Gut health, absorption of nutrients, manufacture of certain B-vitamins, bowel regularity


Broad spectrum plant based digestive enzyme formula

 

1-2 capsules with food

Support digestion and breakdown of food


Zinc citrate

 

15-45mg daily

Adrenal support; anti-inflammatory

Spirulina or green powder formula

As indicated

To help alkalise the system and nourish the adrenals

 

 

Useful Nutrigold Newsletters

Health benefits of krill oil

Fish oil – essential for hearts, brains and life itself

Adrenal Support

Calming and cleansing the colon

Vitamin C – our shield from misfortune

Super spirulina – for the spring in your step

The importance of daily alkalising

 

Useful articles

Simply magnesium

Stress Reduction – Stress and Hypertension

Cheer up with vitamin C

The hows and whys of alkalising

B Vitamins and their impact on heart disease reduction

Which form of omega 3 oil is best?

Probiotics Stop Candida Taking Hold

Fighting Fit with Gut Flora

 

 

Useful webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Natural Approach to Headache Treatment and Prevention Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

SUMMER SURVIVAL GUIDE

(See also SUNBURN PREVENTION and HAYFEVER)

Summertime often brings with it more sunshine, more time outdoors and perhaps holidays abroad. While all of this is largely positive and enjoyable, summer can be made miserable by sunburn, insect bites, hayfever and overheating. Here are some simple tips to help keep summertime fun. 
 

Diet and Lifestyle

Sun protection

Many sun creams and blocks contain carcinogenic ingredients and also prevent vitamin D production in your skin. Some companies offer natural alternatives – look for zinc oxide based formulas (with no nano particles). You can also build protection from the inside with an antioxidant-rich diet for 3 months beforehand and also during the summer months.

Particularly useful for the 3 months before are beta-carotene (in carrots and many antioxidant supplements), astaxanthin (in krill oil) and vitamin D (most diet sources poor, so supplementation recommended).

During the summer, vitamins C and E, selenium, zinc, alpha- and beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, quercetin, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, resveratrol, grapeseed extract and various bioflavonoids may all be helpful in protecting the skin against harmful sunrays. Aim for a hydrating diet rich in fresh fruit and vegetables as well as a good antioxidant formula for skin health.

Sunburn
Aloe vera as a soothing balm is one of the most effective lotions for sunburn – look for whole leaf cold pressed aloe vera juice. Hydration is important for the skin, too, and evening primrose oil contains skin-nourishing omega 6 EFAs.

Insect bites and stings
Aloe vera is also a powerful anti-inflammatory, useful for calming down the itchiness, irritation and swelling of insect bites and stings. Vitamins B5 (calcium pantothenate, B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate) and vitamin C may also be useful in helping to calm down the adrenal response to bites and stings, together with keeping hydrated.

Hayfever
The same level of adrenal support can also be useful for hayfever, i.e. vitamins B5 (calcium pantothenate, B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate) and vitamin C together with a hydrating and also alkalising diet.

Staying cool
Aloe vera juice is cooling as well as anti-inflammatory, so a shot in your morning vegetable juice or smoothie may help you stay cool in the sunshine. It can also be used topically on heat rashes.
Cooling foods to include in your diet are cucumbers, celery, lettuce, green leafy vegetables, seaweed, fruit, barley, millet, buckwheat, eggs and peppermint tea.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil

500mg-1000mg Daily

Contains antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances

Vitamin C

500-1000mg daily

Antioxidant; role in collagen formation; adrenal support

Vitamin E

400IU daily

Antioxidant

Beta carotene

15 mg daily

Antioxidant

Astaxanthin

4mg daily

Antioxidant

Zinc Citrate

15mg daily

Antioxidant role in collagen formation

Other useful antioxidants: resveratrol, grapeseed extract, lutein, zeaxanthin etc

 

Antioxidant

Silicon

10mg daily

Role in collagen formation

Vitamin B5 (Calcium pantothenate)

500mg twice daily

Adrenal support

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate)

20mg daily

Adrenal support

Vitamin D

1000-3000IU According to Sun Eposure

Anti-oxidant

 

Useful articles

Optimum nutrition is the key to healthy, vibrant skin

An alphabet of antioxidants

Vitamin D – more than a ray of sunshine

Holiday travel kit

Is sun tan lotion safe?

Charities’ U-Turn on sun advice

Skin newsletter
 

Useful webinars

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Antioxidants, Carotenoids, Flavonoids and Polyphenols CPD Accredited Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Update on Aloe CPD Accredited Webinar: 21st Century Uses for a Naturopathic Staple

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

UPDATE ON VITAMIN D: SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST BONE HEALTH CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

CHINESE 5 ELEMENTS & NUTRITION CPD ACCREDITED WEBINAR

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

SUNBURN PREVENTION

Sunburn occurs when ultraviolet light (sunlight) burns the skin causing the production of free radicals  and damaging the skins structure.  Symptoms include bright red skin which is hot and sore to the touch, dizziness, nausea and fatigue.  
 

Diet and Lifestyle

Even mild sunburn should be avoided. There is evidence that occasional accidental sunburn increases the risk of cancer more than constant, careful exposure to the sun. Sun-safe habits include covering up (long sleeved clothing), wearing a hat, and using a high protection-factor sun-block. Antioxidant nutrients vitamin C, vitamin E, beta carotene and selenium can be used to support the bodys  defence against free radical damage and aid healing from sunburn.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin E

400IU daily

Antioxidant protection, skin healing

Beta carotene

15mg daily

Antioxidant protection, skin healing

Vitamin C

1000mg daily

Antioxidant protection, skin healing

Selenium

100mcg daily

Antioxidant protection, skin healing

Whole leaf aloe vera juice

10-50ml per day internally, also use topically directly on sunburn

Skin healing, anti-inflammatory.

 

Useful Articles 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/.../NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens. pdf 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Healthcare.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Update on Aloe: 21st Century uses for this naturopathic staple

Eczema Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Antioxidants, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols

 

Note on Supplements
If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

TENDONITIS AND BURSITIS

Tendonitis (e.g. tennis elbow, frozen shoulder) is inflammation of a tendon, whilst bursitis is inflammation of the fluid-filled sac that surrounds a joint. Both of these conditions usually result from either a sudden or repetitive strain, or an infection.

It is often useful to follow patterns of strain in the body – for example tendonitis in the wrist may be related to tightness in the upper back and shoulders. This tightness may restrict the flow of nutrients to the area for recovery and repair, as well as removal of debris and waste.

To counter this restriction, the tissue and muscles need a) good levels of hydration and b) good levels of magnesium and coenzyme Q10.

Frozen shoulder is more common in middle-aged women, and a link has been noted with impaired thyroid activity. Reverse T3, produced when T4 isn’t being properly converted to T3, is thought to stimulate fibroblasts into overproduction of tissue fibres. So it may also be useful to look at thyroid support, noting that selenium, iron, copper, zinc and a range of B vitamins are required to help convert T4 into T3. Kombu/kelp and wakame seaweeds contain many of these nutrients alongside thyroid-supporting iodine.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

The diet therefore needs to be hydrating, with plenty of water, soups and salads, for example. Magnesium may need to be supplemented due to general soil deficiency, and can also be found in nuts, seeds and green leafy vegetables. CoQ10 is found in meat and fish, but may also need to be supplemented in ubiquinol form.

The diet should also be alkalising – which means plenty of vegetables and keeping meat and fish to much smaller amounts than many of us are used to. This will help to keep the tissue hydrated, as excess acidity is often deposited into connective tissue instead of water.

The area needs to be completely rested until it is completely recovered. Some gentle stretching may be useful. 

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil

500-1000mg daily

To help maintain fluidity in tissue cells

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To help relax areas of tension

Coenzyme Q10 in ubiquinol form

30-100mg daily

To help relax areas of tension

Good quality multivitamin and mineral

As indicated

Containing selenium, iron, copper, zinc and a range of B vitamins

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Pain relief

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-healthy-joints.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Biomedical-Joint-Connective-Tissue.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NGCoEnzymeQ10.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Detoxification.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf

 

Useful Webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Joint and Connective Tissue

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Adrenal Support Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Thyroid webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

THRUSH

Also see candidiasis

Candidiasis is a term used to describe overgrowth of Candida, a bacteria that becomes a yeast-like organism when oxygen levels are low. Candida is normally kept in good balance with the rest of the bacteria throughout the body – bacteria populate all of our mucous membranes, including the digestive tract, lungs, bladder and vagina - but can overgrow under certain conditions.

This can occur due to antibiotics, the contraceptive pill, pregnancy, high dietary intake of sugar, stress or stagnation.

The symptoms may include thrush, fluid retention, muscle aches, frequent infections, depression, chronic aches and allergies.

Anti-fungal agents, be they pharmaceutical or natural, may be appropriate for severe cases, but are only a short-term solution. Instead, a holistic approach should involve recreating an environment where the bacteria can return to their usual healthy balance.


Diet & Lifestyle

The diet should be alkalising, with plenty of vegetables and low to moderate levels of proteins and carbohydrates (including fruit). Sugar, gluten, refined foods, alcohol, tea, coffee, smoked/pickled meat or fish products, artificial additives and wherever possible, milk, should be avoided.

Small amounts of fermented vegetables and other fermented foods may be useful.

Plenty of water is recommended, perhaps 1.5-2 litres daily (a glass at a time at intervals through the day).


Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Aloe vera

As indicated

To help repopulate the gut with “friendly” bacteria

A good quality probiotic

As indicated

Fructo-oligosaccharides are prebiotics which help to rebalance bacteria

Magnesium citrate

400-600mg daily

To help the cells produce energy and so counter stagnation.

Krill oil

500mg daily

To help fluidity at cell membrane level and so counter stagnation

Biotin

500 mg twice daily

Biotin is believed by some people to prevent the conversion of the yeast form of Candida to the fungal (overgrowth) form


Useful Articles
 

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Educational-Newsletter-Bowel-Flora-Issue2.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Aloe-Vera-Issue1.pdf


Useful Webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance
Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
Understanding Dysbiosis Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

  

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

 

TINNITUS

Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) is an extremely common problem with many different causes. It is more widespread after the age of forty years, and is likely to be due to a number of factors (e.g. excessive exposure to loud sounds, food allergies, bacterial imbalance and stress).

 

Diet & Lifestyle

The Chinese speak about the ears as being the Sense Organ of the kidneys, which relate to the Water Element in Five Elements theory, and are also described as regulating water and mineral balance in Western medicine. It may therefore be useful to consider the situation in terms of levels of hydration – not just how much water is bring drunk, but also how well that water is flowing around the body. Constriction and/or stagnation will lead to a situation of poor hydration.

So fluid intake may be addressed – including looking at water quality as well as reducing stimulants and diuretics such as tea, coffee and alcohol.

It may also be useful to avoid foods that may be contributing to inflammation, such as dairy, gluten and sugar.

 

Useful Supplements

 

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Krill oil or marine fish oil

500-1000mg daily krill oil or 2000-4000mg daily marine fish oil

To help fluidity at cell membrane level and so increase flow of fluids in and out of cells

Magnesium citrate

Approx. 400mg daily

To help drive electrolyte exchange and so increase flow of fluids in and out of cells

Ginkgo biloba, extract

120 mg daily

In one trial, this herb reduced tinnitus and in some people, it caused the ringing to completely disappear. The benefits occurred within 70 days but the success rate is greatly reduced if the ringing has been constant for more than a year.

Broad spectrum probiotic

As indicated

To help rebalance bacteria in the ears

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf


Useful Webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps - Probiotics and Health - What you need to know!
Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps
The Art of Detoxing: A Naturopathic Approach Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

VARICOSE VEINS

Varicose veins are enlarged uncomfortable veins which are generally just below the skin surface on the legs. Up to half of all adults are affected by this condition. Veins are thin-walled vessels that if put under too much pressure and unsupported by surrounding tissues, will gradually become stretched. Contributing factors include standing for long hours, constipation, heavy lifting and pregnancy.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

A hydrating diet with good levels of fibre is essential to avoid constipation and straining; varicose veins are rare in populations who have high fibre intakes.

Bilberries have been shown in 2 studies to resolve varicose veins and haemorrhoids in pregnant women, perhaps due to their capillary strengthening effect.

Liver support may also be useful. Toxicity is carried via the blood (and lymph) to the liver to be processed and then eliminated, usually via the bowel. If the liver is overloaded, then toxicity may back up into blood putting extra pressure on the veins. Castor oil packing and coffee enemas may be helpful where appropriate (note that during pregnancy castor oil packing should not be used and enemas only under professional guidance).

Standing for long periods should be avoided if possible. Exercise such as walking and cycling can help. When resting, legs should be raised, and not crossed.
 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grape seed, bilberry, pine bark extract)

 

Helps repair blood vessels and leg ulcers

Vitamin C with bioflavonoids

1–2 g

For building collagen

Vitamin E

400 IU daily

May help improve circulation and has healing properties

 

Useful Articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf


Useful Webinars

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

Liver & Gall Bladder Health Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.    

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT

The number of overweight and obese people in the UK is on the increase with an estimated 50% of the population being classed as obese by 2050 if current trends continue.

Obesity is defined as having a body mass index higher than 30.  This level of excess weight increases the risk of many chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, stroke and arthritis.  Fat deposited around the tummy and abdomen behaves differently to other fat cells, releasing its own inflammatory chemicals and hormones, increasing the risk of systemic inflammation and damage.

The sharp rise in people being overweight is largely due to modern sedentary lifestyles and an abundance of aggressively marketed cheap, low nutrient processed foods and beverages.  The popularity of ‘low fat’ foods in the 1970s, 80s and 90s has led to an overuse of sugar in processed foods and many people are simply unaware of the sugar content of everyday food items like cereals and bread.

Chronic stress and inactivity leads to ongoing production of cortisol, a stress hormone which encourages central weight gain.  Stress management techniques are often a vital part of weight loss programmes.

Digestive wellbeing is crucial; obese people have been shown to host a different profile of gut bacteria which may alter carbohydrate metabolism and fat storage.

 

Diet and Lifestyle

Avoid all processed, refined foods, artificial sweeteners and sugars.  Limit natural fruit sugars and sweeteners such as agave and maple syrup.  The diet must focus on modest amounts of unrefined wholegrains (oats, quinoa, buckwheat, rye, barley, wholewheat, millet and amaranth) combined with plenty of good quality protein (oily fish, nuts, seeds, nut butters, lentils, beans, pulses, poultry, white fish) modest amounts of red meat and an abundance of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables.  The antioxidant nutrients supplied by fruits and vegetables protect against the effects of toxins stored in fat cells which become liberated during fat loss.

Fibre found in nuts, soaked ground flaxseeds, pulses, beans, vegetables and wholegrains enhance feelings of satiety and fullness.  Essential fats from oily fish, nuts, seeds and cold pressed flax oil support healthy metabolism and circulation and reduce inflammation.  Combining protein with slow releasing carbohydrates encourages blood sugar stability and can reduce cravings.

Drink at least 1.5l of water each day; herb teas and redbush tea can also be included.  Green tea has been shown to stimulate metabolism and support weight balance. 

A healthy balanced breakfast is vital as it sets up blood sugar levels and hormonal rhythms for the rest of the day.  Eat regularly throughout the day to avoid sharp dips in blood sugar which can trigger cravings.

Do not eat hurriedly or on the go.  Take 5 slow deep breaths before eating and chew food thoroughly.  Wait 20mins after finishing a meal before deciding on dessert – it takes this length of time for the brain to register satiety.

If chronic stress is a factor, include stress management techniques such as hypnotherapy, acupuncture, yoga and meditation.

Include regular exercise, at least 30mins each day.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Multi-vitamin/mineral supplement

Containing zinc 15 mg, vitamin C, chromium, vitamin B complex and selenium

Energy production, blood sugar stability and antioxidant protection.

Multi strain high strength probiotic formula

As directed

Absorption of nutrients, elimination of toxins, regulation of carbohydrate metabolism.

Plant based digestive enzyme formula

As directed, with meals

Provides enzymes necessary for the efficient digestion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates including lactose, gluten and plant fibres.

Krill oil

500-1000mg per day

Anti-inflammatory.

Spirulina powder

5-10g per day

Detoxification, balances appetite and cravings.

Organic virgin coconut oil

1 tablespoon per day

Provides medium-chain-triglycerides which nourish gut bacteria and support healthy metabolism

 

Useful Articles 

The Power of Alkalising – Appetite and Weight Balance

The Importance of Supergreens

Super Spirulina

The how’s and why’s of alkalising

Detoxification & Cleansing

Digestive Enzymes

Bowel Flora

 

Useful webinars

Coeliac Disease

Understanding Food Allergy

Digestive Enzymes – the key to optimum health

Understanding Dysbiosis

Supporting Immunity

Nutritional Approaches to managing IBS

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here



Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.

WOUND HEALING / RECOVERY FROM OPERATION

Also see BRUISES

Whether recovering from an accidental wound or injury, or a deliberate trauma such as an operation, your body requires a great deal of resources to go through a successful healing process. The healing response begins with inflammation, which creates a lot of movement of resources to the area, which ideally then calms down as the area heals.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

Wound healing support needs to provide the nutrients and energy for the processes of inflammation and blood clotting, as well as for resolving inflammation. The entire process involves a complex interaction of compounds, enzymes and hormones that need a range of nutrients, including omega 3 and 6 oils, saturated fats (for steroid hormones), proteins, minerals (including magnesium, zinc, manganese) and vitamins (including vitamin C and E). Chlorophyll, which provides the vibrant green colour in wheatgrass and other leafy greens, has also been noted for wound healing. In addition, vitamin K and calcium are important for blood clotting. 

Vitamin C, fish oil and krill oil are all blood thinners, so while they are crucial for wound healing, supplemental forms of these should be avoided a few days before any operations.

After an injury or trauma, new connective tissue will need to be formed, which requires good levels of vitamin C, zinc, iron, copper, silicon and essential fatty acids, among other nutrients.

A well balanced diet with plenty of green leafy vegetables and salads and some oily fish (such as sardines, mackerel, salmon and trout) and seeds (such as pumpkin and sesame seeds) will provide much of this. Take care to avoid sugar, and foods that may lower your nutrient intake, such as white flour, highly processed foods, gluten, dairy, damaged fats, caffeine and alcohol.

So that nutrients and healing compounds can flow freely to the area and debris can be carried away, the blood, lymph, interstitial fluids and connective tissue need to be hydrated and circulation needs to be good. Good levels of fluids and electrolytes, especially magnesium and potassium, are therefore essential. It is also important to keep the connective tissue alkalised, as conditions of acidity will create dehydration, and also make it more difficult to make the enzymes, hormones and other compounds necessary for wound healing.

Aloe vera can be useful both topically and orally to help reduce inflammation and support the healing of burns, cuts, bites, sprains and other injuries.

 

Useful Supplements

Supplement

How much?

Why?

Vitamin C with bioflavenoids

Build up to 3000mg daily, 1 with each meal (not all at once)

Anti-inflammatory; needed for wound healing, making new connective tissue

Zinc citrate

Build up to 50-60mg daily; take away from other foods and supplements, apart from B6 (20mg daily)

Anti-inflammatory; needed for wound healing, making new connective tissue

Good quality multimineral and vitamin, avoiding minerals in carbonate or oxide form

As indicated

 

Krill or marine fish oils (containing EPA and DHA). (This is not the same as cod liver oil.)

500-1000mg krill oil daily or 3-4g fish oil (take with protein)

Anti-inflammatory

Magnesium citrate

Build up to 400-600mg daily

Electrolyte important for hydration

Aloe vera

Topically and orally as indicated

Anti-inflammatory; assists healing process

Supergreen powder

As indicated

Alkalising; chlorophyll for wound healing

Hop alpha acids

As indicated

Pain relief; anti-inflammatory

Anthocyanidins (e.g. grapeseed, bilberry extract)

 

Inhibits inflammatory chemicals

 

Useful articles

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/skin_news.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Biomedical-Joint-Connective-Tissue.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/Nutrigold_Newsletter_Oxycell.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Education-Newsletter-8-Supergreens.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/could_pre_sprouted_barley_put_the_bounce_back_into_your_life

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/chlorophyll_the_alkalising_molecule_of_life

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG_Newsletter_Pain.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Newsletter-Aloe-Magazine-Ten.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/info/detail/simply_magnesium

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-_Health-Benefits-of-Krill-Oil.pdf

http://updates.nutrigold.co.uk/assets/pdf/newsletters/NG-Krill-Oil-Background-and-Benefits.pdf

 

Useful webinars

Nourishing the Skin from Within Webinar by Kirsten Chick

Managing Pain Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Understanding the Omega Oil Revolution Webinar by Dr Elisabeth Philipps

Webinar by Kirsten Chick - How and Why We Need To Support The Bodys PH Balance

 

Note on Guidelines

These nutritional recommendations are designed as a practitioner guideline only and are not intended to be seen in anyway as medical advice.  The suggestions described here and in recommended articles, newsletters and webinars may vary according to research available at the time and the individual approaches of each author. Should the reader have a medical concern or concerns about possible interactions between food supplements and prescribed drugs, always consult your GP or complementary health professional before undertaking any of these recommendations.     

 

Note on Supplements

If you have any questions about the recommended upper levels for a food supplement or interactions between drugs and food supplements please click here

Cautions:

When taking food supplements we recommend you always follow the recommendations on the label. 

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and lifestyle.

This is not medical advice and each case can be quite different so If you have any concerns about possible interactions between food supplements always consult your practitioner before undertaking a new food supplement regime, or call us on 0845 603 5675.